Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Curtis Rueden
151 followers -
"Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd." —Voltaire
"Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd." —Voltaire

151 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A couple of months ago, I posted (https://plus.google.com/+CurtisRueden/posts/XBzXd4zuZAD) about the need for a Java package manager similar to npm or gem. The idea is nothing new (http://www.javalobby.org/java/forums/t75340.html), but the need continues, of course.

It turns out that Peter Kriens (of BND fame) already lamented the situation (http://softwaresimplexity.blogspot.com/2012/04/just-another-package-manager.html) last year, and decided to do something about it. The result, JPM4J (http://www.jpm4j.org/), is still a young project and immature in many ways, but overall I find it quite impressive. Also interesting is MOP (http://mop.fusesource.org/). Definitely going to see what I can contribute to one or both of those projects!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
After playing with git-pissed (https://github.com/chrishunt/git-pissed), I gained a renewed appreciation for how nice Ruby gems are. Except for the fact that they are language-specific, of course. There are quite a few different binary code repositories out there, generally one per popular programming language. I was curious whether:

1) Anyone was making an effort to reconcile them; and/or

2) Anyone had made a super easy way to install and run Java packages from Maven Central yet (like "gem install" or "pip install" etc., but for Java).

I didn't find anything, but did find someone compiling statistics about these repositories:

    http://modulecounts.com/

Great stuff, though it doesn't yet include Linux package managers or Homebrew or MacPorts. Getting greedy there, I suppose.

Anyway, I really crave a way to ease packaging and installation of Java programs. Maven is a great starting point but does not accomplish all the same goals. Maybe I'll scratch that itch someday soon.

Scratching the itch for #1 above in a general way would be way more work, but oh so satisfying! The only way I can think to do it, though, is a customized bridge implementation between each pair of repositories; e.g., JRuby lets you run pure Ruby programs in a JVM and could maybe (mostly) bridge RubyGems and Maven Central. Unfortunately, solving all the native dependency issues (e.g., for mixed Python/C) would be pretty much a full-time job.

It just bothers me to see stuff like this:
https://rubygems.org/gems/bouncy-castle-java

Which is just a repackaging of a Java library as a Ruby Gem. Where will it all end??
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
HR 3699, the Research Works Act will be detrimental to the free flow of scientific information that was created using Federal funds. It is an attempt to put federally funded scientific information behind pay-walls, and confer the ownership of the information to a private entity. This is an affront to open government and open access to information created using public funds.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
ImageJ on Google+!
Add a comment...

I know it's just Moore's Law, but seeing a machine equipped with 2TB of RAM wows me. Probably because it is now feasible to build a rack server with more RAM than disk.
Add a comment...

I largely agree with Antoine de Saint Exupéry that "perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away." However, I grow increasingly concerned with the tech industry's recent obsession to over-minimize operating systems, particularly user interfaces. OS X Lion no longer has scroll bars, even when they would be necessary. Ubuntu Unity, from all reports I have heard, is essentially unusable for power users. And Windows 8... well, Windows 8 looks like it could be really cool, maybe, if Microsoft were capable of learning from their mistakes. But in the meantime, Windows 7 is a hodge-podge—many first party apps even hide the menu bar, for crying out loud, which has historically been the primary way of accessing an application's functionality.

Worse, new releases like Lion remove other core functionality. No more Rosetta? No more Java or Flash preinstalled? No more support for the Motion JPEG codec? That last decision is frankly baffling to me. Those codecs have been stable for many years. What more is needed to support them? What possible motivation is there for removing that functionality?

To a large extent, I blame smartphones. It was necessary to produce a stripped down, touchscreen-based OS for them, so we got iOS and Android. And while I have my beefs with some of their design decisions, all in all they are reasonable, tailored for the devices they service. And from a design perspective I see the appeal of trying to unify iOS and Mac OS X, too. But not to the detriment of functionality! Our desktops and laptops have full keyboards! Mice! Touchpads! Why gimp the interface to match a smartphone when keyboards are so much more powerful?

In the conclusion of Ars Technica's review of Lion, they said: "Over the past decade, better technology has simply reduced the number of things that we need to care about. Lion is better technology. It marks the point where Mac OS X releases stop being defined by what's been added. From now on, Mac OS X should be judged by what's been removed." I think there is truth there, but not in the way they meant.

http://windowsitpro.com/windows-8/future-simplicity
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded