Profile

Cover photo
Curious.com
209 followers|25,683 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
We’re excited to announce our newest Curious course - +Sunset Magazine's Guide to Outdoor Cooking! http://curious.com/sunsetoutdoorcooking
1
 
You've probably heard that last week Microsoft officially stopped supporting Windows XP, its 12-year-old operating system that became the most popular OS in history. It is still found on a quarter of all desktops in the world. In technology time, that's like a dinosaur still roaming the earth. While few will miss the outdated icons and cheesy startup sound, people are mourning the disappearance of XP's default desktop image. Called "Bliss," it is a photo of rolling emerald green hills and a neon blue sky with puffy clouds so white they look fake. Taken by former National Geographic photographer Charles O'Rear in California's Napa Valley after a storm, nothing in the photo is faked. It is estimated "Bliss" has been seen by more people than any other photo in the world: over one billion. Click below for one last peek at the photo which kept millions of people from throwing their computers through windows. 
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
The moment you think you are experiencing right now, while you're reading this sentence, is actually a composite of the previous 15 seconds of your life. That's according to a study published last week in Nature Neuroscience. This 15 second phenomenon, known as the continuity field, could answer a lot of questions about how we pay attention to things. Our brain appears to form a version of reality that combines events from the very recent past. Scientists hypothesize this could help us ignore minute details--like every single raindrop in a storm--while still being acutely aware that it is raining. Hmm... since it only took you about 15 seconds to read this Curio then you just got "instantly" smarter. 
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
One of the great mysteries in geophysics is how (and how much) heat is generated in the Earth's core. It is believed most of the planet's heat is generated by the decay of radioactive elements like potassium-40 and thorium-232. If this kind of radioactive decay is occurring, it should be possible from the Earth's surface to detect its byproduct particles, called antineutrinos. Antineutrinos go right through metal and rock. But, they are also produced by nuclear power plants, making it difficult to detect which ones are coming from the Earth's core. Until now. An Italian team has made a detailed "antineutrino map" of all man-made radioactive decay around the world. The hope is scientists can measure the flux of antineutrinos around the globe, use the map to subtract the man-made ones, and finally determine if our planet is functioning like a gigantic nuclear reactor. That's so cool... I mean, hot. 
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
We all know music can influence our behavior, but there is ample evidence music can literally make us "lost in time." A bar playing slower-tempo music causes patrons to linger and buy more drinks. A call center with subdued hold music has fewer hang ups. Shoppers spend longer in a stores when background music is slower. When your brain is distracted by a steady pace of music, you are less likely to notice how much time has passed. Fast music has the opposite effect. In a 2004 study, Wagner's Ride of the Valkyrie was found to be the most dangerous music to play in the car--the frenzied tempo warped subjects' normal sense of speed. Neurologically, music causes our sensory cortex to go into hyperdrive while our prefrontal cortex--focused on introspection and reflection--shuts down. The rhythm has such a powerful impact that scientists believe the beat changes the discrete unit our brain uses to measure time. We not only feel the beat, we live to it. Rock on! 
1
Have them in circles
209 people

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
Located just outside of Mexico City, the Pyramid of the Sun is one of the most mammoth and stunning structures ever made by man. Built around 100 A.D., archaeologists believe it took 150 years to construct, and was the centerpiece of the ancient city of Teotihuacan. While the Aztecs later used the pyramid for religious purposes, scholars don't know why the temple was first built or what it contained. Now a local nuclear physicist, Arturo Menchaca, is mapping the innards of the pyramid using a home made muon detector. Muons are cosmic particles that can penetrate rock, and can be detected from afar--with some expense and difficulty. He is hoping to "see" if there are hidden chambers beneath the pyramid which could contain treasure or an explanation of why it was built. Dr. Menchaca says his research has discovered great secrets, but he's refusing to reveal anything until his publication date. Sounds like this could be an Indiana Jones sequel!
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Slurpee, like most worthy inventions, was created by accident. In 1958 Omar Knedlik, a World War II veteran, moved to Kansas and bought a Dairy Queen franchise. He didn't have a soda fountain, so he put soda in his freezer to stay cool for the hot summer. When he inadvertently served half-frozen soda to his customers, they loved it. Soon people were demanding the treat. Knedlik spent 5 years developing a machine that could consistently produce the "slushy" results: an apparatus that used a car air conditioning unit and a tumbler. He created a company to make the machines, named it ICEE, and rented them to stores along with exclusive geographic distribution rights. In 1965 ICEE signed a special license with 7-Eleven to sell the drinks under a different name: Slurpee. Today over 7 million gallons of Slurpee--about $300 million worth--are consumed each year. It's been a cultural phenom for over fifty years, with recent product placements involving the likes of John Stewart, the TV show Glee, and President Obama. It's almost like the drink's popularity is frozen in time!
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
Velcro isn't just for children's shoes anymore. It's used in home decorating, army tanks, and even astronauts' spacesuits. It all started when Swiss engineer George de Mestral noticed burrs stuck to his clothing during a hike. Mestral studied the burrs under a microscope and discovered they were covered in tiny hooks, allowing them to grab clothes. 8 years of research later, he had created 2 strips of fabric: one covered with thousands of hooks, and the other with tiny loops. Though many give NASA credit for inventing Velcro, Mestral actually patented the idea in 1955. It was mostly used in athletic equipment and shoes until Velcro's Director of Sales appeared on the David Letterman Show in 1984. The interview ended with Letterman--dressed in a Velcro suit--jumping off of a trampoline onto a wall of Velcro. He stuck, and so did the idea of non conventional Velcro applications, causing demand to explode. It is even said that the U.S. Army has developed a silent version for soldiers' uniforms, but since it's classified information, nobody has gotten that rumor to, um, stick. 
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ever wondered why some things taste really bad after brushing your teeth? It's not the mint flavor of your toothpaste clashing with your breakfast. Instead, thank sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) for making your OJ taste funny. SLS gives the paste a foamy quality which makes you feel like it is working more effectively. SLS is added to shampoo for the same reason: consumers believe foaming shampoos clean better. Marketing tactics aside, SLS messes with your taste buds. It dampens your sweet taste receptors, and also destroys naturally occurring phospholipids in your mouth that suppress bitter taste receptors. So when you drink orange juice, not only do you not taste the sweet, but you get double the normal bitterness. Yuck!
1

Curious.com

Shared publicly  - 
 
From FitBits to Google Glass, wearable technology is garnering a lot of attention. Now a company named MC10 has announced plans to manufacture a wearable computer "skin" that can sense your actions, monitor and store your physiological data, and deliver drugs. This ultra-thin material is thinner than a bandaid and thicker than a stick-on tattoo, but stretches and bends in a similar way to human skin. It can even be woven into fabrics. Called the BioStamp--they might want to hire a new marketing person--it can communicate to a nearby mobile device using "near field communication" similar to how your car's EZPass pays tolls. Advocates claim this is a game changer because it is the first wearable technology that escapes the rigid, rectangular form factor, making it much less awkward and restrictive. I'm not so sure. It's a guarantee I will put my first one of these things through the washing machine. 
1
People
Have them in circles
209 people
Links
Story
Tagline
We're a new online social learning startup in Menlo Park, California with tough challenges and crazy characters.