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CullenWebb Animal Eye Specialists
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Here's Troy, Millie, and their mom.

Troy and Millie were brought into CullenWebb for hearing testing. Hearing testing can be done as early as 6 weeks of age 😊

Responsible breeders of breeds prone to coat colour-related deafness test their puppies for deafness in order to reduce the incidence of deafness in their breed and also so they can inform owners of prospective pet homes.

A variety of breeds are predisposed to coat colour related deafness including, but not limited to, Parsons and Jack Russell terriers, English setters, English cocker spaniels, Dalmatians, Merle coloured breeds, Harlequin Great Danes, Catahoula Leopard dogs, Dogo Argentino, Bulldogs (French and English), Boston terriers, etc.

Breeds with inherited, non coat coloured related deafness include Doberman Pinschers, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Border collies.

Cats can also be affected and include any breed that are pure white (with or without blue eyes), or that have excessive white marking.

Of course, aside from heritable deafnesses, deafness can occur secondary to diseases of the ear or be seen as an aging process.

Deafness is best evaluated by professionals with expertise and extensive training in electrophysiology, like Dr Webb, who holds a PhD in Neuroscience, in addition to being an ABVO Resident.

To arrange an appointment, contact CullenWebb directly at 1-506-204-8433 #cullenwebb #animal #deafness #puppy
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Here's Branson, Bridget and their mom.
Branson and Bridget's mom brought them into CullenWebb for hearing testing prior to using them for breeding.

Responsible breeders of breeds prone to coat colour-related deafness test their puppies for deafness in order to reduce the incidence of deafness in their breed and also so they can inform owners of prospective pet homes.
A variety of breeds are predisposed to coat colour related deafness including, but not limited to, Parsons and Jack Russell terriers, English setters, English cocker spaniels, Dalmatians, Merle coloured breeds, Harlequin Great Danes, Catahoula Leopard dogs, Dogo Argentino, Bulldogs (French and English), Boston terriers, etc.

Breeds with inherited, non coat coloured related deafness include Doberman Pinschers, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Border collies.

Cats can also be affected and include any breed that are pure white (with or without blue eyes), or that have excessive white marking.

Of course, aside from heritable deafnesses, deafness can occur secondary to diseases of the ear or be seen as an aging process.

Deafness is best evaluated by professionals with expertise and extensive training in electrophysiology, like Dr Webb, who holds a PhD in Neuroscience, in addition to being an ABVO Resident.

To arrange an appointment, contact CullenWebb directly at 1-506-204-8433 #cullenwebb #animal #deafness #puppy
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Here's Aponi, her mom and dad, and Dr Cullen.

Aponi is only 1.5 years old and just had her inherited cataracts removed. She is such a sweet dog 🐢😊.

So you might be wondering what she is wearing for head gear... Aponi is sporting an Optivizor. The optivizor is an alternative to the traditional e-collar (aka cone of shame/lamp shade collar), though it may not be tolerated or well-suited to all dogs. In some instances, like Aponi, the patient can be habituated to wearing the optivizor prior to a scheduled eye surgery.

A cataract is characterized by an opaqueness to the lens. As opposed to age-related hardening of the lens (lenticular sclerosis), an animal cannot see through a cataract.

Cataracts are either congenital and/or inherited, or acquired due to either inflammation (eg due to an infection) of the eye, metabolic disease (eg diabetes), toxin-related, or some exogenous traumatic event.

Cataracts are more common in dogs compared to cats, but can occur in any species. Cataracts not only cause vision impairment, but can also cause painful conditions like inflammation and secondary glaucoma. Treatments are aimed at controlling the inflammation or surgery to remove the cataracts.

CullenWebb recommends all patients with cataracts, regardless of species, be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist.

Such an examination will permit an expert evaluation so that potential causes and treatment options can be thoroughly discussed. Moreover, further ocular findings can be identified that may not have been previously identified.

To arrange an appointment either request referral by your veterinarian or contact CullenWebb directly at
1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#cataracts #animaleyedoctor #veterinary #animaleyes #eyes #specialist #ophthalmologist @dogsofinstagram #dogs_of_instagram
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Here's Frank, his mom and dad, and Dr Cullen.

Frank just had his inherited cataracts removed and he'll now be able to see the Christmas tree πŸŽ„ πŸ‘πŸ˜Š. In the adjacent photo you can see the artificial lens that was placed after his cataracts were removed.

A cataract is characterized by an opaqueness to the lens. As opposed to age-related hardening of the lens (lenticular sclerosis), an animal cannot see through a cataract.

Cataracts are either congenital and/or inherited, or acquired due to either inflammation (eg due to an infection) of the eye, metabolic disease (eg diabetes), toxin-related, or some exogenous traumatic event.

Cataracts are more common in dogs compared to cats, but can occur in any species. Cataracts not only cause vision impairment, but can also cause painful conditions like inflammation and secondary glaucoma. Treatments are aimed at controlling the inflammation or surgery to remove the cataracts.

CullenWebb recommends all patients with cataracts, regardless of species, be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist.

Such an examination will permit an expert evaluation so that potential causes and treatment options can be thoroughly discussed. Moreover, further ocular findings can be identified that may not have been previously identified.

To arrange an appointment either request referral by your veterinarian or contact CullenWebb directly at
1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#cataracts #animaleyedoctor #veterinary #animaleyes #eyes #specialist #ophthalmologist @dogsofinstagram #dogs_of_instagram
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Here is Bubbles, his mom and dad, and Dr Cullen. The video clip shows Bubbles having his cataract removed from one of his eyes.

Bubbles was given the gift 🎁 of sight by having his diabetic cataracts removed at CullenWebb. It will be a special Christmas πŸŽ„ for Bubbles and his family.

A cataract is characterized by an opaqueness to the lens. As opposed to age-related hardening of the lens (lenticular sclerosis), an animal cannot see through a cataract.

Cataracts are either congenital and/or inherited, or acquired due to either inflammation (eg due to an infection) of the eye, metabolic disease (eg diabetes), toxin-related, or some exogenous traumatic event.

Cataracts are more common in dogs compared to cats, but can occur in any species. Cataracts not only cause vision impairment, but can also cause painful conditions like inflammation and secondary glaucoma. Treatments are aimed at controlling the inflammation or surgery to remove the cataracts.

CullenWebb recommends all patients with cataracts, regardless of species, be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist.

Such an examination will permit an expert evaluation so that potential causes and treatment options can be thoroughly discussed. Moreover, further ocular findings can be identified that may not have been previously identified.

To arrange an appointment either request referral by your veterinarian or contact CullenWebb directly at
1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#cataracts #animaleyedoctor #veterinary #animaleyes #eyes #specialist #ophthalmologist @dogsofinstagram #dogs_of_instagram
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12/9/16
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Here's Lucius, his mom and Dr Cullen.

Lucius just had his cataracts removed and is able to see again. His mom says he acts like he is 5 years younger now that he can see again.

Cataracts are either congenital and/or inherited, or acquired due to either inflammation (eg due to an infection) of the eye, metabolic disease (eg diabetes), toxin-related, or some exogenous traumatic event.

Cataracts are more common in dogs compared to cats, but can occur in any species. Cataracts not only cause vision impairment, but can also cause painful conditions like inflammation and secondary glaucoma. Treatments are aimed at controlling the inflammation or surgery to remove the cataracts.

CullenWebb recommends all patients with cataracts, regardless of species, be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist. Such an examination will permit an expert evaluation so that potential causes and treatment options can be thoroughly discussed. Moreover, further ocular findings can be identified that may not have been previously recognized.

To arrange an appointment either request referral by your veterinarian or contact CullenWebb directly at 1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#cataracts #animaleyedoctor #veterinary #animaleyes #eyes #specialist #ophthalmologist @dogsofinstagram #dogs_of_instagram @vetgirlontherun @vetstreet @vetgeek
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Just because...
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This is the eye of a young Rottweiler patient that had haired skin growing on the surface of his eye - known as a corneal dermoid.

Animals are born with dermoids and they result because of abnormal development in utero. If not removed corneal dermoids will cause ocular irritation, ulceration and impair vision.

CullenWebb recommends all patients with corneal dermoids be seen by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist for assessment and to provide treatment options. Removal requires surgical expertise otherwise the eye may be made blind by causing perforation.

To arrange an appointment either request referral by your family veterinarian or contact CullenWebb directly at 1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#dermoid #veterinaryophthalmology #animaleyedoctor #animaleyes #dog #puppy
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Here is a young Burmese cat with a prolapsed gland of the third eyelid (aka cherry eye πŸ’).

Cherry eye is not uncommon in dogs, though is seen less commonly in cats. Though cherry eye can occur in any breed of cat it is most commonly seen in brachycephalic (flat-faced) breeds including Burmese, Persians, among others.

Cherry eye is treated surgically with the goal of permanently replacing the gland of the third eyelid in its normal anatomical position while maintaining its function. Without treatment their is longstanding ocular irritation, impairment of vision, and increased risk of developing dry-eye and subsequent corneal ulceration.

CullenWebb recommends that all patients with cherry-eye that is unable to be successfully surgically treated, or if there is uncertainty as to whether the patient has a cherry eye compared to a tumour, be referred to a veterinary ophthalmologist.

To arrange an appointment either request referral by your family veterinarian or contact us directly at 1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#animaleyedoctor #cherryeye #veterinary #specialist #cat
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The cornea is first structure that light encounters when entering the eye of an animal. If the cornea no longer transparent then vision is compromised.

There are several reasons why the cornea may be discoloured and these include fluid within the cornea (edema), blood within the cornea, pigment on the inner or outer surface of the cornea, or inflammatory cells within or on the surface of the cornea. Note that many of these causes of corneal discolouration occur together.

In this image if a cat eye with proliferative keratoconjunctivitis, the cornea is discoulored because of inflammatory cellular deposition and infiltration, and corneal edema. Fortunately this patient was referred by his family veterinarian, thereby resulting in an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. It is anticipated that this patient will have a clear cornea, with appropriate medical therapy, and be able to see normally againπŸ˜ŠπŸ‘

CullenWebb recommends that all patients with corneal discolouration without appropriate diagnosis and treatment be referred to a veterinary ophthalmologist.

To arrange an appointment request referral by your family veterinarian or contact us directly at 1-506-204-8433

www.cullenwebb.com

#eosinophilic #keratoconjunctivitis #cat #animaleyedoctor #specialist #cornea
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