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National Cryptologic Museum Foundation
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Preserving cryptologic history & honoring contributions.
Preserving cryptologic history & honoring contributions.

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National Cryptologic Museum Foundation's posts

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#OTD 24 February 1954: Captain Thomas Dyer, USN, became the first NSA Historian.

"As the lead cryptanalyst at Station HYPO in Hawaii from 1936 to 1945, Thomas H. "Tommy" Dyer led the team that was responsible for most of the breakthroughs in reading Japanese naval communications during the war in the Pacific. After the war, he continued a brilliant career and went on to be one of the three primary cryptanalytic trainers, along with William Friedman and Lambros Callimahos, for both Armed Forces Security Agency (AFSA) and National Security Agency." ~ excerpt from Dyer's 2002 Hall of Honor entry. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2lITQ6D
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#OTD 23 February 1932: Boris Hagelin, in Sweden, received his first cryptographic patent. Historian David Kahn has suggested that Hagelin was the only cypher-machine maker who ever became a millionaire: http://bit.ly/2kqR6dh
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#OTD 22 February 1996: Memorial Wall honoring those who sacrificed their lives was dedicated at OPS2B in NSA. The wall now lists 176 names of Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, and civilian cryptologists who have made the ultimate sacrifice: http://bit.ly/2la0pTb #cryptology
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Ms. Sarah George Bagley was not only the first female telegrapher, but she was also a pioneer of equal rights for women and all oppressed or enslaved people. Ahead of her time in the 1840s, she would likely be leading the charge in many equal rights and labor campaigns today. #OTD in 1846 she became the first female telegrapher in Lowell, MA.: http://bit.ly/2lJ5q1N #telegraphy #femalepioneer #equalrights
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Catching up on some reading over the rest of the Winter? If you've never read Elliot Carlson's "Joe Rochefort's War," we recommend checking it out. Learn more about it: http://bit.ly/21EW4mW
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Determined to attend more cryptologic programs in 2017? Register now for the NCMF's Spring cryptologic program on 29 March featuring author Stephen Budiansky ("Code Warriors"), as well as the AFIO's 24 February program featuring authors Robert Wallace and H. Keith Melton ("Spy Sites of Washington, DC) and Dr. James E. Mitchell ("Enhanced Interrogation Techniques"). Get more info about both at www.cryptologicfoundation.org
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#OTD 16 February 1973: Ribbon-cutting ceremony for National SIGINT Operations Center (NSOC). Color photo is circa 1985. www.bit.ly/CryptologicDates
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#OTD 15 February 1946: The ENIAC computer begins operating. Photo: Jean Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas set up the ENIAC in 1946. Bilas is arranging the program settings on the Master Programmer. Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania. Learn more: bit.ly/2lKldOA #computers #computerhistory
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How about this patriotic Valentine? Happy Valentine's Day!
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#OTD 10 February 1952: Death of Edward Hebern, developer of an electric coding and decoding machine. The National Cryptologic Museum has two very rare five-rotor Hebern cipher machines in its collection. The Hebern Electric Company built what is acknowledged to be the first five-rotor cipher machine in the 1920's (a number of others were designed independently about the same time). Although this machine was never widely manufactured or used, it is cryptologically significant as part of the overall evolution in U.S. manufactured rotor devices. We believe these two five-rotor machines are the only two that have survived. www.bit.y/CryptologicDates
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