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National Cryptologic Museum Foundation
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Preserving cryptologic history & honoring contributions.
Preserving cryptologic history & honoring contributions.

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Our 2018 General Membership Meeting & Annual Symposium, "Crack the Sky, Shake the Earth," will focus on the Vietnam War and will feature special NSA and CIA panel discussions. Get details about the panels on our website. In addition to program-related presentations and a keynote address, there will be updates about the Foundation, New Museum Project, and current Museum initiatives. Visit our site to get more info or to register now: http://bit.ly/2xcFSCc

Registration includes breakfast and lunch. The fee is $25 for NCMF members and $50 for non-members ($50 includes a one-year NCMF basic membership). A downloadable event flyer is available on our website to share with friends, colleagues, and others in your community.
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On this day, now known as "Patriot Day," (a National Day of Service & Remembrance) we pause to reflect on the tragic events of 9-11-2001. We remember and honor all of the victims and pay tribute to the valiant first responders. We will always remember. #NeverForget
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#OTD 7 September 1983: Boris Hagelin, inventor of Converter M-209 cryptodevice, died on this date in 1983. Over 100,000 M-209s were produced during WWII for the Army and Navy, making Hagelin the first millionaire from cryptology: http://bit.ly/2CjFNl7
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In Sept 1939, the U.S. Army's SIS team of cryptanalysts issued the first PURPLE translation. QUIZ - do you know why William Friedman used codeword "MAGIC" for intel in the U.S. decrypts? Solving PURPLE was the result of a team effort under the overall direction of William Friedman, with Frank Rowlett leading the day-to-day efforts. Genevieve Grotjan, Albert Small, and Samuel Snyder, junior cryptanalysts, also made important contributions. Visit the "Magic of PURPLE" exhibit at the #NCM. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2oITnoC
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In September 1958, a C-130 (Flight 60528) was shot down while on recon mission over Soviet Armenia. The C-130 aircraft pictured here was the centerpiece of National Vigilance Park outside of the National Cryptologic Museum. The aircraft, configured for reconnaissance, was refurbished to resemble the C-130A downed in September 1958. It was dedicated in 1997 as a memorial to the fallen. Although Vigilance Park was dismantled due to NSA construction, there are plans to rebuild the Park once the new museum is built: http://bit.ly/2CsvT0S
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Ah, the Internet of Things..... Are our smart homes, companies, and cities putting us at serious risk? Check out this recent post on the NCMF blog: http://bit.ly/2PS72Gg
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We have excellent news! The National Cryptologic Museum was featured in an article by Robert Gabrick for "America in WWII" magazine - the Aug 2018 edition. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2BZcUL5
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#OTD August 25, 1778 marked the beginnings of the Culper Spy Ring with General George Washington and Continental Army Major Benjamin Tallmadge. It was on this date that Maj Tallmadge convinced Gen Washington that Abraham Woodhull would make a good agent to gather intelligence in New York City, the British Army's headquarters and base of operations during the American Revolutionary War. Later, Washington gave Tallmadge the assignment to set up a network of spies and couriers in New York City. And Tallmadge became chief of intelligence: http://bit.ly/2wgAmgv
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Celebrating the August birthdays of three of our cryptologic heroes! Col Parker Hitt, Mrs. Elizebeth Friedman, and Dr. Abraham Sinkov. Learn more on the calendar: bit.ly/CryptologicDates
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#OTD 22 August 1956: Chinese fighters shot down a U.S. Navy reconnaissance plane (P4M-1Q Mercator) over Shengsi Islands, killing all 16 crew members. At that time, it was the costliest Naval reconnaissance loss to date: http://bit.ly/2PeSbWd
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