Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Crossroads University
18 followers -
Passing down the root, one course at a time.
Passing down the root, one course at a time.

18 followers
About
Crossroads University's posts

Post has attachment
In New Orleans, anyone can practice Voodoo. There is no formal religious initiation rite, no rigid orthodoxy, and there are no standard ways to worship—although there are guidelines. New Orleans Voodoo is a fluid, adaptable, syncretic, and inclusive spiritual and religious practice that embraces the hearts of all people, no matter their race, creed, or origin. The loas, spirits, orishas, and mysteries—all terms used to describe the divine archetypal, natural and spiritual forces of New Orleans Voodoo—are ever-changing, manifesting in infinite ways according to the filter of a given culture and geographic location.

The word Voodoo means “spirit of God.” Contrary to popular belief, Voodoo is first and foremost about healing. It is a religious system based on three levels of spirit: God, the loa, and ancestors. Voodoo believers accept the existence of one ultimate god referred to as Bon Dieu (Good God), below which are the powerful spirits often referred to as loas. These powerful spirits act as intermediaries between Bon Dieu and practitioners and are responsible for the daily matters of life in the areas of family, love, money, happiness, wealth, and revenge. Finally, ancestor reverence is considered to be the foundation of New Orleans Voodoo. The loas and ancestors are not worshipped; rather, they are served and revered, respectively. 

To learn in depth about this beautiful tradition, enroll in the course Foundations of New Orleans Voudou. We will teach you and guide you in a correct and authentic practice if that is what you seek, or simply provide you with information and experiences if that is your desire. Our curriculum incorporates teachings of New Orleans Voudou elders and scholars who have devoted much of their life's work in learning about the tradition. There is no longer the need to keep looking for where you can learn. Feel the drumbeats of our Ancestors, it is what connects us. We invite you to our home, Foundations of New Orleans Voudou, at Crossroads University. 

http://neworleansvoudou.weebly.com/

Post has attachment
In New Orleans, anyone can practice Voodoo. There is no formal religious initiation rite, no rigid orthodoxy, and there are no standard ways to worship—although there are guidelines. New Orleans Voodoo is a fluid, adaptable, syncretic, and inclusive spiritual and religious practice that embraces the hearts of all people, no matter their race, creed, or origin. The loas, spirits, orishas, and mysteries—all terms used to describe the divine archetypal, natural and spiritual forces of New Orleans Voodoo—are ever-changing, manifesting in infinite ways according to the filter of a given culture and geographic location.

The word Voodoo means “spirit of God.” Contrary to popular belief, Voodoo is first and foremost about healing. It is a religious system based on three levels of spirit: God, the loa, and ancestors. Voodoo believers accept the existence of one ultimate god referred to as Bon Dieu (Good God), below which are the powerful spirits often referred to as loas. These powerful spirits act as intermediaries between Bon Dieu and practitioners and are responsible for the daily matters of life in the areas of family, love, money, happiness, wealth, and revenge. Finally, ancestor reverence is considered to be the foundation of New Orleans Voodoo. The loas and ancestors are not worshipped; rather, they are served and revered, respectively. 

To learn in depth about this beautiful tradition, enroll in the course Foundations of New Orleans Voudou. We will teach you and guide you in a correct and authentic practice if that is what you seek, or simply provide you with information and experiences if that is your desire. Our curriculum incorporates teachings of New Orleans Voudou elders and scholars who have devoted much of their life's work in learning about the tradition. There is no longer the need to keep looking for where you can learn. Feel the drumbeats of our Ancestors, it is what connects us. We invite you to our home, Foundations of New Orleans Voudou, at Crossroads University. 

http://neworleansvoudou.weebly.com/
Photo

Post has attachment
The North West Conjure Retreat with David M Rojas, Sindy Todo and other holistic practitioners...these two individuals are highly respected  colleagues with Crossroads University. I am proud to recommend their unique approaches to the wide world of conjure! Check it out here: http://nwcrossroadsretreat.com/

Post has attachment
Southern Rootwork is a living tradition currently practiced and passed along by word of mouth, imitation, and observation over time and space within groups, such as family, ethnic, social class, regional, and others. It evolved out of a conglomeration of African Traditional Religions (ATRs) brought to American shores with the slave trade. The words Hoodoo and conjure are often used interchangeably with rootwork to denote various forms of African-based ethnobotanical, folk magic systems, medicinal healing and hexing through the use of herbs, roots, bones, and stones. Southern rootwork as we know it today is largely influenced by Native American and Latino Diasporic traditions, as well as European folk magic and Jewish mysticism.

This course delves deep into the African mystical roots of the core practices of rootwork and traces its evolution into its contemporary expression today.
http://www.southernrootwork.com/

Post has attachment
When the slave became sick we most time had the best care take of us. Maser let our old mammy doctor us and she used herbs from the woods, such as: cami weeds, peach tree leaves, red oak bark, for fever chills and malaria and yes one more weed: privet weed for T.B. or things that way that the white doctor could not cure. Yes if we got a leg or arm broken Maser would have the white doctor with us, but that was about all for our negro mammy was one of the best doctors in the world with her herb teas. When she gives you some tea made from herbs you could just bet it would do you good.  

~ John Mosely, born 1851 in Texas

Post has attachment
Most of St. Expedite’s life is a mystery, as very little has been documented apart from his martyrdom and stories surrounding the discovery of his statue. One version of the story of how St. Expedite came to be in New Orleans is recounted by Father Dan Cambria of the Divine Mercy Chapel in New Orleans. He states it was the Ursuline nuns who received an unidentified statue just prior to the French Revolution. All over the exterior of the crate in which the statue was housed were the words “Expedite.” The nuns proceeded to open up the box and when they saw the statue, none of them recognized the identity of the saint. They asked the bishop to identify the saint; but, the bishop was unable to identify the saint. So, the nuns wrote a letter to the people who sent the statue from France inquiring as to the saints' identity. Unfortunately, the French Revolution had already begun and they never received a reply. So, they placed the statue of the unidentified saint whom they now called St. Expedite in the corridor of their school where it remained for several decades.               

The students at the convent eventually developed what is referred to as the Nine Hour Novena to St. Expedite. Learn how to perform this novena on the Crossroads University blog: http://www.crossroads-university.com/blog/a-nine-hour-novena-to-st-expedite

Observation and preservation of indigenous culture - that is what Crossroads University is all about. We offer a perspective of folk magic and healing traditions from differing points of view in an effort to share the ancient wisdom and knowledge that has supported indigenous people for thousands of years. Specifically, we are dedicated to the observation and preservation of indigenous magickal and spiritual traditions, herbal pharmacopoeia, and the healing traditions found in the Southern United States with African and Native American roots. Collectively, these separate but related traditions are referred to by several names including, but not limited to, Hoodoo, Conjure and Rootwork.
http://www.witchvox.com/lx/dt_lx.html?a=usaz&id=41922

Post has attachment
Learn the definition and history of hoodoo, conjure and rootwork at Crossroads University. Students receive instruction from initiated elders in Ifa, Santeria, Palo, New Orleans Voudou, Hoodoo, Rootwork and Native American traditions. We also teach about Appalachian conjure, Louisiana traiteurs, Spiritualism, Latin American folk magic and other related folk magic traditions. Some of our instructors also hold advanced academic degrees which gives us a unique practitioner scholar perspective to our content development and delivery. Our personal experience, professional training and academic expertise equal an instructor pool that is unsurpassed.

*We are the only online school that provides formal education about New Orleans Voudou, Marie Laveaux and Native American Conjure, with culture-specific instruction as to the spiritual and magickal practices associated with each.

http://www.crossroads-university.com/

Post has attachment
What is hoodoo? Start a conversation about the definition of hoodoo and it invariably elicits responses from many folks centered around African American folk magic. African American folk magic with all sorts of influences, from Native American, European and a more recent pseudotheory regarding its Irish roots. As an academic, I am not one to weigh in heavily on pseudoscience and internet chatter, which is largely regurgitated pseudoscience at best; rather, I look to the elders of the traditions and to the scholarly literature. I look for a balance of these two sources, combined with my own personal experiences as someone indigenous to the traditions and to my own painstaking research from which to draw my own conclusions. See what a review of 20 different sites reveal on an internet search about the definition of hoodoo... http://www.southernrootwork.com/southern-rootwork-blog

Post has attachment
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded