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Craig Trader
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This article is long. Too bad, read it anyways. Hate guns? It will say things you agree with, and things you won't -- read the whole thing anyways. Love guns? Same thing -- stuff you'll like, and stuff you won't, and you should read the whole thing.  Why?  Because even with the parts I disagree with, he makes damn good points, and at the end, offers up a reasonable idea, which I will repeat here for those of you who won't be bothered to read a long piece of prose.

The NRA has good gun safety rules; we should make them Federal law, with reasonable penalties, and then keep in mind Rule #0 -- there are no accidents with guns.

ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. If you accidently shoot someone, you are prima facie in violation of this rule, and therefore it isn't an accident.

ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot. Again, there's no such thing as an accident shooting.

ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use. With the corollary that you should always assume that a gun is loaded unless you have personally verified its state.

(There are more, read the Fine Article for discussion and examples.)

I will add one more idea, which is that these rules should apply to everyone including the police. Decided to shoot a dog and shot a 4-year old child instead?  You're guilty.  Decided to shoot a crazy person at Costco and shot your partner instead?  You're guilty.  

There Are No Accidents With Guns.

These are the NRA's own rules, so it shouldn't be hard to get the NRA on-board to pass them, right?  Everyone else should be on board with laws that penalize irresponsible behavior.

These ideas make so much sense, that the original author will probably be crucified, burned at the stake, and then buried alive.

H/T +Marc Baker and +Paul Comeau.
Here we are yet again. Nine more Americans slaughtered by a raging madman with a gun and bad haircut. Nine more innocents slaughtered because we absolutely, utterly, refuse to do anything to prevent it. This time it was Cha...
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Yeah, I'm behind this 100%.
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OK, how does removing Civil War / battle simulations make any sense, whatsoever? Does anyone really think that taking the role of Lee in the Battle of Gettysburg in any way suggest racism?
 
WHUT

The short version: Apple is removing any app/game from their store that contains the Confederate Battle Flag.  Even if it is a purely historical context.

What next?  Removing any mention of Nazi's?  How about Genghis Khan?  How about removing any app that mentions the existence of any religion?  Those are all bound to offend someone.

From the article:

It's looking like Apple has pulled everything from the App Store that features a Confederate flag, regardless of context. The reasoning Apple is sending developers is "...because it includes images of the confederate flag used in offensive and mean-spirited ways." We just spoke with Andrew from HexWar Games, who have released many historical strategy games. He insists, "We're in no way sympathetic to the use of the flag in an offensive way, we used it purely because historically that was the flag that was used at the time."
[appicon]If you've been watching the news recently, you'll know of the huge debate in the U.S over the role of the Confederate flag in contemporary America. Many see it as a reminder of the many pre-Civil War injustices while others see it simply as a way to honor the soldiers who died fo
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I was wondering about all the WWII games that have swastikas representing Nazi Germany.

Maybe there aren't so many of those any more because the swastika is against German law? I don't actually know.
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To no one's surprise, big ISPs believe that the only thing better than getting paid, is getting paid twice. No one should be surprised  that if they can't get paid twice, they'll just deliver half as much service to their customers. The surprise is that someone has managed to prove it.
Study finds significant degradations of networks for five largest ISPs, including AT&T and Time Warner, representing 75% of all wireline households in US
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I think that assertion may be a stretch, but I'd go with "worst when compared against reasonable expectations".
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I've been beating that drum about "heritage".
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I could tell stories ... and I could be prosecuted for violating NDAs, so I won't ... suffice to say, the OP is correct: security comes way behind getting into production.

H/T +Daniel Keys Moran 
 
From 2003 to 2008 I pursued a Ph.D. at the University of Iowa, where my area of research was secure software engineering.  My one-sentence description of my research goal was, "Security has to be part of the ongoing process and we really don't know how to do that."  I never did finish my thesis, and part of that was because of a breakthrough in understanding I achieved while participating in ACCURATE.

ACCURATE was a National Science Foundation-sponsored research group which explored the world of electronic voting.  I was a founding member of it (at least, founding graduate student).  My adviser, Doug Jones, who was a plank owner of ACCURATE, asked me to join the group because he foresaw them really needing someone who'd thought long and hard about how to bake security into engineering practices.

When the State of California was doing its top-to-bottom review of electronic voting machines, their Secretary of State, Deb Bowen, reached out to ACCURATE-affiliated universities to provide the necessary experts.  I was not a principal investigator on the top-to-bottom review: my role was peripheral at best.

Why?  You'd think it would be a slam-dunk: get the nerd who focuses on secure software engineering to talk to the security nerds who worked for Diebold, ES&S, Sequoia, and other firms.

What made me a peripheral figure was this: there were no security nerds there.  There was, as near as ACCURATE could tell, no one at any level of these companies' electronic-voting divisions who was a specialist in computer security.  As a result, my involvement in the top-to-bottom review went from critical person to who's-he? in the space of a heartbeat.  I had nothing to contribute to a critical analysis of their security engineering process because they literally had no security engineering process to analyze.

Democracy was being administered by closed-source software written by people who couldn't recognize a buffer overflow even when it was pointed out to them... and these firms were making money hand over fist.

I'll be honest: I spent most of that summer drinking heavily.  I'd invested so much of my life in the pursuit of better, safer software, only to realize that I'd wasted my life.  I'd been chasing technological or engineering solutions, and the reality was neither of those were letting us down.  We have great technologies to help in security, and engineering process can accommodate security as a core requirement.

What was letting us down was, well... us.

I didn't have a good solution for that.  I still don't.

Once I think I might have a handle on it, then I'll go back and finish my Ph.D. thesis on how to write better, safer software.  But I can no longer subscribe to the belief that security is a matter of getting the technology right.  That belief is old, broken, and simply not viable any more.

Security is a matter of getting us right.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/business/2015/06/22/net-of-insecurity-part-3/
As the Web arrived in the 1990s, tech giants churned out flawed products, unleashing bugs that persist today.
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And another item is added to the pre-flight checklist. Twenty years from now, they'll still be checking for cats, and have no idea why, but check they will.
 
This today. Only this.
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Fortunately, "The cat is doing well, she is still our mascot."
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So Airbus thinks they have an answer to +SpaceX for launcher reusability. I see some pluses and minuses, but what I don't see is an implementation. If Airbus wants to compete in this game, then they need to actually build their system, deploy it, and test it in the marketplace. Because the age of waiting for a government to fund your grand plans is over -- instead, it's the age of "Build it and see if anyone cares".
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30% saving isn't enough to get me excited. This still wastes too much.
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+SpaceX will be launching their 7th supply run to the ISS this Sunday. A controlled descent and landing of the Falcon 9 first stage is planned ... here's hoping it works this time!

#NASA   #CRS   #SpaceX  
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Here's your chance to ruin change the world! Looks like it will ship in time for Christmas Brunswick Games Day.
 
It has been 50 years since the popular card game was first published by Doug Malewicki. It's time to celebrate with a new edition.
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Hmmm ... 
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Anthropomorphism:  Powering stories since 150,000 BCE and probably earlier....
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This just in from the Department of WTF?
"There was one gunman with a handgun and they chose to turn this house into something that resembles Osama Bin Laden's compound."
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Oh, snap!
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I solve problems ... usually with computers.
Introduction
  • I am a founding member of Barking Mad Productions, a group that produces LARPs and runs a gaming convention.
  • I am a member of Nova Labs, a makerspace serving Northern Virginia.
Bragging rights
I have (and exhibit) the largest portable marble machine East of the Mississippi (http://chaos.trader.name/).
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W. Craig Trader