Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Craig Moore
737 followers -
Owner of the English Fly Fishing Shop selling trout, bonefish, permit and salmon fishing flies
Owner of the English Fly Fishing Shop selling trout, bonefish, permit and salmon fishing flies

737 followers
About
Craig's posts

Post has attachment

White Marabou Muddler Minnow
http://bit.ly/Whitemud
The White Marabou Muddler Minnow fly pattern is a good imitation of a small sculpin. Many smallmouth bass rivers have large populations of sculpins. 
Photo

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Bloodworm Epoxy Buzzer Midge Nymph
http://bit.ly/1PtDO7l
When there are midge bloodworm nymph drifting in the river or lake you are fishing then the Bloodworm Red Epoxy Buzzer Midge nymph fly should be one of the fly patterns you choose to tie onto the end of a dropper
Photo

Post has attachment
Pink and Tan Mini Puff Bonefish Saltwater Fly 
http://bit.ly/minipuff
he Mini puff is a long time favorite fly used all over the world. It is great for spooky shallow water bonefish tailers! It was first tied by Capt. Neil Bohannon in the 70's and is still one of the best for shallow flats and nervous fish. It is lightly dressed for a soft presentation in skinny water. It lands like a feather, sinks slowly. The perfect skinny water fly.

This fly is an inverted hook pattern. It is designed so that the hook rides above the shank in the water. The idea is that the hook does not get caught on the bottom. By adding a relatively stiff wing material near the hook eye which covers the hook point, the fly becomes nearly weedless. If tied with sparse materials these flies can be made to sink very fast. This fly will bounce up and down on the retrieve and makes puffy little clouds on the bottom that sends out visible signals to nearby fish who interpret it as, ‘there is something moving down there that maybe good to eat. In nature if you can be seen your dead. Most prey species of the bonefish are very well camouflaged. Your fly must not mimic nature to well for if it cannot be seen you will not catch fish.


Because the Mini Puff fly rides hook up it consequently does not gill hook many fish unlike the conventional hook down fly. Although the fly was not designed with this feature in mind it has increased the amount of fish that can be caught and released. In nature if you can be seen your dead. Subtle colored flies work best on sunny, bright days in shallow water. Bright colored flies work best on cloudy days in deeper water or at sunset. Bonefish patterns should match the color of the bottom in the area you are fishing: light colored flies on light sandy bottoms and dark colored flies on dark turtle grass/coral bottoms. Flies that hit the water with little impact are more effective than those that strike heavy and spook the fish.


Bonefish know that if they reach the crest of a flat on an incoming tide they will find the best food waiting for them. Look at your tide tables and find the crest. Sometimes schools of Bonefish will rush towards there as the tide turns and starts to flood. Getting a take is all about placement and delivery in front of your target.. Sometimes it does not matter if your fly is tan or orange.


On my last trip my guide spotted a single Bonefish grubbing in the mud about 50 feet from the boat in perhaps 18 inches of water. I managed to get a perfect cast to it, started retrieving and felt the line tighten as the the fish took. The normal advice at this point is to keep retrieving, not strike, as the the fish will generally hook itself. it worked. For a couple of seconds the fish jut shook it's head, not knowing what had happened to it. then it took of in a flash. these fish are really fast. In seconds all the fly line and half the backing had gone from the reel. I eventually landed a nice 6lb bonefish.


With a slow moving fish I have been able to get a a bite by casting behind the tail (admittedly the first time I did this was by mistake and a short cast). I noticed the fish visible change directions as it heard the plop of the fly. It must have thought that some thing was alive behind it and trying to escape. It wheeled around and went to investigate. It saw the puffs of sand as I retrieved and it attacked. It does not always work but is a good last resort option that has claimed a number of bonefish.http://bit.ly/minipuff
Photo

Post has attachment
Great fishing art work

www.flyfishing-flies.com
Photo

Post has attachment

Red & Yellow Tarpon Seaducer
http://bit.ly/seaducer
 This pattern is like the Florida Key Style Tarpon fly but the hook shank is covered with palmered hackle, left upright to be less streamlined and create more disturbance in the water. The Seaducer was one of the first "fuzzy" saltwater flies. The wrapped hackle acts to create lots of fish attracting vibrations when stripped and helps hold the fly level in the water column during the pause. It also has the attribute of falling to the surface more quietly and not spooking jumpy fish. 

It is ideal for Tarpon as well as redfish, striped bass, snook and other species that prefer slow moving undulating flies with great action at slow speeds. Homer Rhodes is credited with developing this type of fly in the 1950's for us on the East Coast of America. The pattern was first published by author Joe Bate in his 1950s streamer book, but in Lefty Kreh’s book on saltwater fly patterns he states that he believes that it was a very old fly used in the early 1900’s. It is a great attractor pattern that is especially effective in shallow water.

It has been recorded that noted fly fisherman Chico Fernandez used this pattern extensively and proved it’s worth. You have to offer the Tarpon something that makes it feel it is worth chasing. A big fish is not going to eat a small fly you would use to catch a bonefish. A large meal for a salmon is a titbit for a shark. Tarpon flies are bigger than other flies. http://bit.ly/seaducer
Photo

Post has attachment
The Olive Merkin fly
http://bit.ly/olive-crab
It was developed by Del Brown is one of the best patterns for Permit. Crabs near Mangrove swamps and weed beds have olive shells. (Some say that Jan Isley was the real originator of this style of crab fly with the design of the Isley Crab fly but it is more commonly known as the Dell Brown's Merkin Fly). Our version uses an olive felt disc instead of wool which we found can go out of shape http://bit.ly/olive-crab
Photo

Post has attachment
Easter is coming. Time to go fishing
www.flyfishing-flies.com
Photo

Post has attachment
White Lefty's Deceiver Saltwater fly

http://bit.ly/leftys-white

The White Lefty's Deceiver is an artificial fly commonly categorized as a streamer fly which is fished under the water's surface. It is a popular and widely used pattern for both predacious freshwater and saltwater game fish. It is generally considered one of the top patterns to have in any fly box.




Lefty Kreh, the internationally known author and respected fly fisherman from Maryland, developed this pattern in the late 1950's originally for striped bass in Chesapeake Bay, VA, USA but it is now an adaptable modern classic suitable for most fish. Fly Fisherman Lefty Kreh wanted to make a fly that would not foul, could be made in different colour combinations to match the local baitfish and one that could be made in different sizes. He succeeded. The Lefty's Deceiver is a style of tying designed to resemble the shape and size of various swimming baitfish but when lifted from the water it can be cast with ease like a sleek missile. The wing is attached at the tail of the hook to prevent fouling in flight. It also helps to animate the fly in the water because of its great swimming action. 




The collar is extend well beyond the hook shank allowing the wing feathers to undulate and giving the fly the shape of a fish. We use red flash on the beard of the fly to imitate gills. If a predator fish looks up and sees the white silvery underside of a bait fish it knows which way to attack by which end the gills are. If the gills are at the front it will attack from the rear. The wing material gives the illusion of body width without a lot of extra bulk which would make it sink. The inclusion of generous amounts of flash make the fly a more attractive and noticeable target as it glints in the sun. You cannot go wrong with this fly.




Lefty started his fly fishing addiction in 1947 when fishing guide Joe brooks introduced him to the delights of a fly rod and reel whilst fishing on the Potomic River above Washington DC, USA. When flying ants were falling on the water through exhaustion as they tried to cross the large expanse of water and failed,. Bob would cast to the little rings that appeared on the water surface and catch the rising trout. He did that about eight times. Lefty was amazed. The next day Lefty drove back to Bob's home in Baltimore, Maryland and purchased his first set of fly fishing tackle. Bob gave Lefty his first 9 o'clock to 1 o'clock casting lesson. Lefty carried on practicing and started reading up on his new hobby. 




Jock Scott's Guide to fly fishing was an early favourite read. It was Bob Brooks who introduced Lefty to saltwater fly fishing in 1964 by getting him a job in Miami working for Orvis. He got to met all the local guides and learn from them. He later started to act as a guide and also demonstrate casting techniques, provide fishing lessons and give talks to various groups. This is not a fly just for American waters. If you fly fish in Europe, Australia, New Zealand or South America this is a good fly to use if your target fish feeds on medium sized bait fish. Salmon, steelheads, large trout and pike will attack this beauty. http://bit.ly/leftys-white
Photo

Post has attachment
Enough said. Have a great weekend. Go fly fishing.
www.flyfishing-flies.com
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded