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Connie Carr (Emerald Isle Tour)
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Ireland Tours as you imagined them! ;)
Ireland Tours as you imagined them! ;)

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Only a few days left to avail of our Winter Promotion ! :) We're completely custom, private and personal with the flexibility that most people wish for while in Ireland so ... we'll have the kettle on and fresh scones to go with!!
Secure your savings for a travel date / service that suits you best and ... the deposits are transferable! :)
Visit our website for details and get that bucket tipped over! :)
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The Stone Fort of Grianán of Aileach is sits on a hilltop 250m above sea level, the stone fort was probably first built on an earthen rath.

The view from Aileach is breathtaking. The glistening waters of Lough Foyle and Lough Swilly are clear, as is the form of the entire peninsula. A windy and exposed place, Grianán has been a silent witness to the history of Ireland.

The origins of the Grianán of Aileach fort are dated back to 1700 BC. It is linked to the Tuatha de Danann who invaded Ireland before the Celts and built stone forts on top of strategic hills. They worshipped Dagda (the Good God) and he too is associated with the origins of Aileach. It was he who ordered the building of a stone fort to act as a burial monument to his dead son.

The round fort is built largely without mortar. The interior has three terraces and wooden structures were built against the terraces to provide accommodation. The outline of Bronze Age or Iron Age ramparts can be seen below the fort. Legend states that the giants of Inishowen are lying sleeping but when the sacred sword is removed they will spring to life reclaiming their ancient lands.

Mr Walter Bernard of Derry restored the stone fort or cashel in the 1870's. It is the centrepiece of the site, 23m in internal diameter with walls measuring 5m in height and approximately 4m in thickness. The dry stonewalls contain two passages within them as well as terraces along their interior which would have allowed access to their summit.

It is thought that St Patrick visited the site in the 5th century and baptised the local chieftain, Eoghan (from whom Inis Eoghan gets its name), here.
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2/21/18
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Five Finger strand .. a stunning, secluded and unspoilt sandy beach with the largest sand dunes in Europe reaching a height of 30 meters and great walks around the area. Swimming is not recommended here due to very dangerous under currents and rip tides but it is great for fishing, bird watching and walking. It get it's name from the line of five rock pinnacles which you can see jutting out from the headland at the entrance to the Bay.
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2/21/18
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Views from Malin Head .. the farthest northwest point of the island of Ireland :)
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2/21/18
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Carrickabraughy Castle .. one of the iconic sites of the historic Inishowen peninsula. This O Doherty Castle is one of five in Inishowen, known as O Doherty Country.
Built in the 16th century on a rocky promontory with spectacular views of the Donegal hills and headlands, this O’Doherty stronghold stands on the site of a pre-Viking settlement recorded in the Annals (of Ireland).

Read a verse about the castle from a poem called ‘Dear Old Inishowen‘ by Alexander Reid.

Where roaring billows rage and foam, and sweep the land in spray.
Glashedy rears his rugged head, and smiles on Pollan Bay.
Behind does an ancient Castle stand, erected by one McFall.
All now that remains is the crumbling tower of that once majestic hall.

Visit our website for more information on our Mysteries of Inishowen Day tour at
https://www.emeraldisletour.com/mysteries-of-inishowen.html
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Mamore Gap ... an extremely scenic area of Donegal. At the top of the gap there is a holy well named St. Eigne's Well which is a place where for centuries people have made pilgramages. The surrounding area is called Desertegney, taking its name from the saint.
St. Eigne was probably one of the Céile Dé who were Druids and who saw the coming of The Christ Consciousness and were preaching in Ireland and Scotland long before the first missionaries as referenced in the Annals of the Four Masters in 806AD (also of Donegal).
Beside the well there is also a grotto of Our Lady.
Visit our website for more information on the Mysteries of Inishowen Day tour at https://www.emeraldisletour.com/mysteries-of-inishowen.html
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2/21/18
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O'Doherty's keep and Buncrana Castle ...

Sitting on the banks of the River Crana near Lough Swilly stands the remains of a former 14th century Norman castle, O’Doherty’s Keep. In 1601 it was a small, two-story castle, occupied by Conor McGarret O’Doherty. In 1602 a third storey was added, and the keep restored by Hugh Boy O’Doherty. He intended it as a base for aid from Spanish forces who were expected to arrive at Inch Island.

Crown forces burnt the keep in 1608 in retaliation for the revolt of Sir Cahir O’Doherty, who had sacked and destroyed the city of Derry. After Sir Cahir O’Doherty’s death at the Battle of Kilmacrennan, the Keep was granted to Sir Arthur Chichester, who leased it to Englishman Henry Vaughan. Further restoration work was carried out by the Vaughan family who occupied the keep until 1718.

George Vaughan built Buncrana Castle in 1718. It was one of the first large manor houses built in Inishowen. It was built on the original site of Buncrana, the area surrounding the Keep. Vaughan relocated the town to its present location, where he founded the present main street and erected the Castle Bridge (a six-arched stone single lane bridge) across the River Crana leading to his Castle.
visit our website for or more information on our Mysteries of Inishowen Day tour :) https://www.emeraldisletour.com/mysteries-of-inishowen.html
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2/21/18
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Fort Dunree, Dun Fhraoigh in Irish means, “Fort of the Heather” and indicates that this site has been an important defensive site down through history.

Near to the spot where Wolfe Tone was brought ashore in 1798, this small fort was erected to guard against the possible return of a French invasion fleet.
In the late 19th Century the fort was modernized and enlarged with the building of the ‘Top Fort’ on Dunree Hill. During World War I it stood guard whilst Admiral Lord Jellicoe’s fleet anchored in Lough Swilly prior to engaging the German Navy at the Battle of Jutland.
During World War II Irish forces were stationed at Fort Dunree to prevent the warring nations violating the country’s neutrality. and today Fort Dunree houses a fascinating display of military memorabilia and artifacts as well as an array of large guns from the 20th Century.
For more details, visit our website at https://www.emeraldisletour.com/mysteries-of-inishowen.html
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2/21/18
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Ennis Friary, Co Clare...
Ennis Franciscan friary was built on an island at a point where the river Fergus divides in the mid - late 13th century. Much of Ennis friary survives intact including its very fine stone carvings, now exhibited in the recently refurbished nave of the church.
A beautiful series of carvings were added to the church in the fifteenth century as part of a devotional cycle that introduced the laity to the Passion and Resurrection of Christ. St Francis displaying his stigmata was placed to the left of the great rood screen while to the right was a carving of Christ as the Man of Sorrows surrounded by the Instruments of the Passions. A broken statue of a Pietà, the sorrowful Mary with her deceased son lying across her lap, is one of a number of Irish examples of this popular medieval image which caused the laity to experience the suffering of the Virgin and to be grateful to her for offering up her son for the salvation of humanity. It's an incredible place to visit and soo worth the stop!
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2/21/18
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Trim castle, Co Meath ~ built in 1172 by Hugh de Lacy and his Walter, is one of the largest Norman castles in Ireland and locally referred to as King Johns castle (of Robin Hood) although he never actually lived there. The castle was occupied by de Lacy and his son (along with his wife's mother and brother who were fugitives), Richard II, Henry IV's two sons .. Prince Hal (later Henry V) and Humphrey (later the duke of Gloucester.. about whom Shakespeare wrote 3 plays). Today its a must see attraction that is also known for the film location to 'Braveheart'.
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