Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Color Clipping Limited
19 followers -
Color Clipping :: Photo Manipulation & Image Editing Service Provider. Provide clipping path service in USA, UK.
Color Clipping :: Photo Manipulation & Image Editing Service Provider. Provide clipping path service in USA, UK.

19 followers
About
Color Clipping Limited's interests
View all
Color Clipping Limited's posts

Post has attachment
Is Bound to Make an Increase in Your Property Business on a Tight Budget:
http://www.colorclipping.com/real-estate-photo-editing


Post has attachment
Buffalo food truck finalist in Best Food Truck Graphic Contest

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WKBW) - A Buffalo food truck needs your help to claim the honor of best custom designed food truck.

The Souped Up truck is a finalist in Mobile Cuisine's 2017 Best Food Truck Graphic Design contest. It was one of 10 trucks to rise to the top out of nearly 1,000 submissions from readers of the online food truck trade magazine.

Souped Up is competing against food trucks from large cities such as Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Seattle and Denver. But as of Wednesday evening, it was in second place behind Holyoke Hummus of western Massachusetts.

You can vote daily in the contest by clicking here. It closes on Friday, May 26 at 9:59 EST.
Photo

Post has attachment
For the past three years, I’ve had a Wi-Fi-connected security camera running constantly in my third-floor walkup apartment in San Francisco. Based on how hard it is for me to make it upstairs with a few bags of groceries, I’m not that worried about burglars, but I am concerned about my dog, Tucker. There’s something comforting about being able to confirm that he’s asleep in bed rather than barking uncontrollably.

Now, a new camera launching today out of Playground, the tech incubator founded by Andy Rubin, the father of Android, aims to take my dog monitoring a step further. It adds artificial intelligence to the mix to let you know what’s going on in your home when you’re not there, based on what you’ve told it is important to you. Called Lighthouse, it adds 3D sensing technology and deep learning to a traditional Wi-Fi camera to create a home monitoring solution unlike anything you’ve ever seen before.


Sure, we all want to know if strangers are in our home stealing the TV. But most people use their home security cameras to also do things like check on when the dog walker arrives or when the kids arrive home from school, or, like me, to see if their pooch is barking his face off. With Lighthouse, the camera is able to detect exactly what it’s looking at–for instance, it can tell that it’s your terrier by the door at 2 a.m., not your toddler. It can also understand what’s happening in the image, catalog it, and make it searchable later on.

“We sort of think of it as the inverse of Alexa,” says Jessica Gilmartin, general manager and CMO at Lighthouse, referencing Amazon’s voice assistant. “So, Alexa is a really easy and delightful way for you to understand what’s happening out in the world when you’re home, and Lighthouse is a really easy way for you to understand what’s happening at home when you’re out in the world.”

That search is where Lighthouse, which is about the size of an Amazon Echo, really shines. You can ask it questions like “Who was by the door with the dog this morning?” to determine who might have taken Fido on a walk, or “What time did my kids get home last Tuesday?” Search results are given in video form, so you see the people or animals in question. People are highlighted in blue, and animals in yellow. You can even ask complex questions such as “Were my kids running in the house on Saturday?”

Video results can be saved to your phone or shared with others. Everything you don’t expressly choose to save is archived in the cloud (and encrypted) so you can access it a few weeks down the line if you need to. Cloud storage also means that footage is safe should your home actually get broken into or there’s a fire, and the camera is damaged or destroyed. If you happen to see a break-in or destruction in progress, there are buttons within the app to call 911 or sound an alarm.
For things you expect, you can also set up interesting rules. For instance, if you always expect your kids home between 3-4 p.m. on weekdays, you can have Lighthouse let you know when they don’t arrive home rather than when they do. If you want to talk with your daughter when she gets home, you can set the camera up so if she waves at it when she arrives you’ll receive a push notification and can start chatting with her directly through the camera.

Lighthouse gets its smarts in part from technology used in self-driving cars. CEO and cofounder Alex Teichman led Stanford’s work on self-driving car perception and invented the technology that allows cars to recognize objects that are in front of them, such as people and other cars, and predict what they’ll do next. His cofounder, Hendrik Dahlkamp, was a DARPA Grand Challenge winner for Stanley, the first self-driving car. Dahlkamp was also the first engineer at Google X. All that expertise in computer vision shines in the final product.

“We don’t think of vision as being hard because we just do it, but it’s only right now that this has become possible,” Teichman says. “It’s really because of two things in particular: deep learning, [because] just recently within the first few years we’ve started to have enough computing power to really make use of it, and 3D sensing. And that 3D sensing is something that Hendrik and I took from the self-driving-car world.”

Now, instead of recognizing cars and pedestrians, Teichman and Dahlkamp are using similar technology to distinguish between your 30-pound dog and your 30-pound toddler.

Of course, Lighthouse’s machine-learning system needs plenty of data in order to learn how to recognize imagery on its own. The Lighthouse team has enlisted the help of 150 beta testers that have been using the product for over a year. Their data has helped fine-tune the product for launch. Henceforth, customers will be able to opt into an early-access program that gives them access to new Lighthouse features first in exchange for sharing their data with the company to make the product smarter. If users don’t opt-in, their data won’t be used.

Preorders for Lighthouse start today on the company’s website. The product is sold with a monthly subscription service for video monitoring. The camera is $399 with one year of service, $499 with three years, and $599 with five years. After the initial subscription period, service can be continued for $10 per month.
Source:fastcompany[.]com
BY EMILY PRICE4
Photo

Post has attachment
The Insider Pick:
Point-and-shoot digital cameras are still better than your average smartphone when it comes to taking high-quality photos. The Sony RX100 IV is the best one you can buy with its tremendous image quality and ability to shoot at high speeds.
Point-and-shoot cameras aren’t as popular as they were several years ago. The lower part of the market has become dominated by smartphone cameras, while DSLR cameras rule the upper end of the market. That doesn’t mean you should ignore the best point-and-shoot cameras, though. These cameras still have some benefits that smartphone and DSLR cameras can’t match, making them a perfect choice for certain photographers.

Benefits of point-and-shoot cameras

As the Digital Photography School website explains, point-and-shoot cameras have some areas where they outperform both DSLRs and smartphone cameras.

Optical zoom lens: The optical zoom measurement indicates the ability of the point-and-shoot camera lens to magnify the scene. An optical zoom is preferable to a digital zoom, which is found on smartphone cameras, because the optical zoom mechanism doesn’t sacrifice image quality to achieve the magnification like a digital zoom does.
Small camera body: Point-and-shoot cameras nearly always weigh less than DSLR cameras, while also offering a smaller camera body. So if you’re looking to travel with your camera or if you want to carry it in a pocket, the point-and-shoot camera is a great choice.
Overall cost: A point-and-shoot camera has the lens built into the camera body, meaning it will have a lower cost over the long run than DSLR cameras, where you’ll be buying extra lenses. The lens on a DSLR camera can detach from the camera, and adding a new lens provides different capabilities for the DSLR. Because the point-and-shoot camera lens is built in, you’ll often hear this type of camera called a fixed-lens camera.
Tough and waterproof features: Certain point-and-shoot cameras are able to be used in water because they have a sealed camera body that keeps the water out. Don’t try dunking many smartphone cameras or DSLRs in water (at least without a protective case), or you’re going to end up with an expensive paperweight. Some point-and-shoot cameras also are shockproof, meaning they can survive a fall of several feet without breaking.
Downsides of point-and-shoot cameras

Point-and-shoot cameras certainly won’t fit every photography situation you may encounter, though. The best DSLR cameras are just so strong in so many areas, and smartphone cameras are just so convenient, that it’s tough for an inexpensive point-and-shoot camera to compete in the following areas.

Image quality: We at Business Insider shot a series of photos that compared a DSLR camera, a point-and-shoot camera, and a smartphone camera. The DSLR camera, thanks to a larger image sensor in terms of physical size, is able to outperform both point-and-shoot and smartphone cameras with regard to image quality nearly every time, especially in low-light conditions. The image sensor is the chip inside the camera that measures the light from the scene to create the photograph.
Limited manual control features: Although point-and-shoot cameras do offer many more manual control features than they did a few years ago, experienced photographers still greatly prefer the DSLR cameras because of the full manual controls they offer. Point-and-shoot cameras are designed to be easy to use, which typically means limited manual control over the settings.
Convenience: Because people carry their smartphones with them everywhere, the smartphone camera has grown in popularity in a hurry in the past several years. It’s so convenient to use the smartphone camera that people almost consider it a hassle to have to carry a separate point-and-shoot camera, even if it fits in a pocket.
Although the Sony RX100 IV is our top point-and-shoot camera pick, for various reasons laid out in the slides below, you should also consider the Canon PowerShot G3 X, the Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II, the Nikon Coolpix A300, and the GoPro Hero5 Black.

Photo

Post has shared content
The Most Affordable And Portable 360-Degree VR Camera Is From China

Consuming VR content in 2017, whether it's via budget devices like the Samsung Gear VR or through pricier products like the Oculus Rift, is still a bit of mixed bag. Sure, the very first blast of imagery often does deliver a jolt of "whoa," but after 15 minutes you'll have a headache or strained eyes. And even the highest-end VR goggles today still have resolution that's a bit too low for true immersion (VR won't truly take off until 5G is here in 2020).

Consuming VR content without a headset, however, is usually a more practical and headache-saving experience. Sure, it's less immersive, but you still get the full picture -- you just have to tilt your phone or scroll with a finger. There are quite a few 360-degree cameras on the market right now, but the most affordable and portable one is probably the Insta360 Air.

Made by a Shenzhen-based start-up (just about every tech hardware come from Shenzhen these days), the Air is basically a tiny rubber ball (weighing 26.5g) that plugs into your phone. After that, just download the Insta360 app and you're ready to go. The device uses your phone for power and storage, so the Air does not requiring charging. It's literally a plug-and-play gadget. I made a video below showing the camera and app in action.

Of course, this means the Air isn't the most powerful 360-degree camera out there. It can't shoot videos in 4K resolution, for example, and there's no mic so your videos are going to get the Charlie Chaplin treatment. But it's only $129 compared when other 360-degree cameras from Samsung or Nikon go for double that. If you're a serious videographer, you'd want to pay the extra dough for the better quality videos, but to the other 95% of the population who just want to take immersive photos during their travels? The Air's dual-camera snaps photos at 3,008 X 1,504 resolution, which is quite good. But when you shoot 360-degree videos, the resolution drops to 1,920 X 960, which is a tad below 1080p. The result is still more than enough for average joe users though. Below is a video I shot using the Air.
The Insta360 app is very intuitive an easy to use. Snapping photos and videos is just a matter of one tap, and once finished you can instantly share it to social media platforms like Facebook or YouTube. There are even Instagram-style filter built in if you want to give your photos a makeover. Overall the app interface is clean and coherent.
Photo quality, as mentioned earlier, is quite good -- if there's enough light. As to be expected, if you use this thing out on a dimly-lit street at night, the photo/video will have a ton of noise. But in daylight or venues with good lighting, the image looks vibrant and quite detailed.
The Air is only for Android right now. But Insta360 has a smaller version dubbed the Nano for the iPhone. And if you're reading this thinking the specs and video/photo quality just isn't up to par, well Insta360 has a pro version too that matches the top tier cameras spec for spec, except in typical Chinese company fashion it'll be a lot cheaper than the $500 Nikon KeyMission 360.

If there's one complaint I have, it's that because the device is attached to the phone's bottom, and that you must manually tap the on-screen button to capture an image/video, means you must be in the shot every time. You guys know how much I don't like selfies, so this is effectively only for 360-degree selfies. But if you travel or socialize a lot and want a quick and cheap option to take fun 360-degree photos or videos, the Insta360, at $129, is hard to beat.

Resource:: Ben Sin , CONTRIBUTOR
I cover consumer tech in Asia, focusing on gadgets and gaming
pinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
4/18/17
5 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
The Most Affordable And Portable 360-Degree VR Camera Is From China

Consuming VR content in 2017, whether it's via budget devices like the Samsung Gear VR or through pricier products like the Oculus Rift, is still a bit of mixed bag. Sure, the very first blast of imagery often does deliver a jolt of "whoa," but after 15 minutes you'll have a headache or strained eyes. And even the highest-end VR goggles today still have resolution that's a bit too low for true immersion (VR won't truly take off until 5G is here in 2020).

Consuming VR content without a headset, however, is usually a more practical and headache-saving experience. Sure, it's less immersive, but you still get the full picture -- you just have to tilt your phone or scroll with a finger. There are quite a few 360-degree cameras on the market right now, but the most affordable and portable one is probably the Insta360 Air.

Made by a Shenzhen-based start-up (just about every tech hardware come from Shenzhen these days), the Air is basically a tiny rubber ball (weighing 26.5g) that plugs into your phone. After that, just download the Insta360 app and you're ready to go. The device uses your phone for power and storage, so the Air does not requiring charging. It's literally a plug-and-play gadget. I made a video below showing the camera and app in action.

Of course, this means the Air isn't the most powerful 360-degree camera out there. It can't shoot videos in 4K resolution, for example, and there's no mic so your videos are going to get the Charlie Chaplin treatment. But it's only $129 compared when other 360-degree cameras from Samsung or Nikon go for double that. If you're a serious videographer, you'd want to pay the extra dough for the better quality videos, but to the other 95% of the population who just want to take immersive photos during their travels? The Air's dual-camera snaps photos at 3,008 X 1,504 resolution, which is quite good. But when you shoot 360-degree videos, the resolution drops to 1,920 X 960, which is a tad below 1080p. The result is still more than enough for average joe users though. Below is a video I shot using the Air.
The Insta360 app is very intuitive an easy to use. Snapping photos and videos is just a matter of one tap, and once finished you can instantly share it to social media platforms like Facebook or YouTube. There are even Instagram-style filter built in if you want to give your photos a makeover. Overall the app interface is clean and coherent.
Photo quality, as mentioned earlier, is quite good -- if there's enough light. As to be expected, if you use this thing out on a dimly-lit street at night, the photo/video will have a ton of noise. But in daylight or venues with good lighting, the image looks vibrant and quite detailed.
The Air is only for Android right now. But Insta360 has a smaller version dubbed the Nano for the iPhone. And if you're reading this thinking the specs and video/photo quality just isn't up to par, well Insta360 has a pro version too that matches the top tier cameras spec for spec, except in typical Chinese company fashion it'll be a lot cheaper than the $500 Nikon KeyMission 360.

If there's one complaint I have, it's that because the device is attached to the phone's bottom, and that you must manually tap the on-screen button to capture an image/video, means you must be in the shot every time. You guys know how much I don't like selfies, so this is effectively only for 360-degree selfies. But if you travel or socialize a lot and want a quick and cheap option to take fun 360-degree photos or videos, the Insta360, at $129, is hard to beat.

Resource:: Ben Sin , CONTRIBUTOR
I cover consumer tech in Asia, focusing on gadgets and gaming
pinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
4/18/17
5 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Boxfish 360 Underwater Spherical Camera

Post has shared content
The odd world under the waves is an impeccable place for 360-degree video. To help get it all, Boxfish Exploration has revealed another submerged camera for movie producers and scientists, intended to shoot toward each path in (near) 5K determination while likewise recording information on profundity, water temperature and camera introduction.

The eyes of the Boxfish 360 are three vast cameras with Small scale Four Thirds sensors, which the organization says gives the framework a sensor zone just about five times that of a six-activity camera fix. Every focal point can cover 185 degrees for an aggregate circular determination of 5,040 x 2,520 (barely short of the standard 5,120 x 2,880 of 5K) at 24, 25 or 29.97 edges for each second, and shoot 360-degree stills at 12.1 MP. The outcome, as indicated by Boxfish, is a more honed picture with better shading.

The apparatus is pressed into an anodized aluminum lodging that measures 300 x 165 mm (11.8 x 6.5 in), measures 6 kg (13.2 lb) and can plunge to a profundity of 300 m (984 ft). The battery may just most recent a hour and a half, yet by then, the 64 GB Miniaturized scale SD card would top off, and the organization says that swapping them two is a breeze.

"The magnificence of the Boxfish 360 is that the cameras remain inside the waterproof lodging at all circumstances, and a solitary incubate gives instrument less access to the recorded documents and for charging," says Axel Busch, prime supporter of Boxfish Exploration. "It just pauses for a moment to swap batteries and cards. You are back in the water quicker and the creation work process is a great deal more streamlined."

Back on dry land, getting the recording off the apparatus and into a workable frame is likewise less demanding. Less cameras likewise implies less creases, and on the grounds that they're all edge matched up, the video ought to join together into a circle considerably speedier.

The Boxfish 360 can likewise record information on the profundity of the plunge, the water's temperature, and the introduction of the camera. It's up to individual groups what that data is utilized for, however it could help movie producers monitor how far down a state of intrigue is, or analysts look at how warming water may influence the soundness of a reef.

Alongside the apparatus itself, the Boxfish 360 accompanies six 64 GB small scale SD cards, a neoprene stockpiling sack, charger link, and a couple of other little instruments and new parts.

The Boxfish 360 is not for beginner occasion snaps: at a weighty cost of US$14,990 it's limited to the domain of expert video graphers and research organizations, with requests accessible for the following bunch because of ship mid-May. Whatever remains of us can appreciate the products of the work in the demo video underneath.
Photo

Post has attachment
The odd world under the waves is an impeccable place for 360-degree video. To help get it all, Boxfish Exploration has revealed another submerged camera for movie producers and scientists, intended to shoot toward each path in (near) 5K determination while likewise recording information on profundity, water temperature and camera introduction.

The eyes of the Boxfish 360 are three vast cameras with Small scale Four Thirds sensors, which the organization says gives the framework a sensor zone just about five times that of a six-activity camera fix. Every focal point can cover 185 degrees for an aggregate circular determination of 5,040 x 2,520 (barely short of the standard 5,120 x 2,880 of 5K) at 24, 25 or 29.97 edges for each second, and shoot 360-degree stills at 12.1 MP. The outcome, as indicated by Boxfish, is a more honed picture with better shading.

The apparatus is pressed into an anodized aluminum lodging that measures 300 x 165 mm (11.8 x 6.5 in), measures 6 kg (13.2 lb) and can plunge to a profundity of 300 m (984 ft). The battery may just most recent a hour and a half, yet by then, the 64 GB Miniaturized scale SD card would top off, and the organization says that swapping them two is a breeze.

"The magnificence of the Boxfish 360 is that the cameras remain inside the waterproof lodging at all circumstances, and a solitary incubate gives instrument less access to the recorded documents and for charging," says Axel Busch, prime supporter of Boxfish Exploration. "It just pauses for a moment to swap batteries and cards. You are back in the water quicker and the creation work process is a great deal more streamlined."

Back on dry land, getting the recording off the apparatus and into a workable frame is likewise less demanding. Less cameras likewise implies less creases, and on the grounds that they're all edge matched up, the video ought to join together into a circle considerably speedier.

The Boxfish 360 can likewise record information on the profundity of the plunge, the water's temperature, and the introduction of the camera. It's up to individual groups what that data is utilized for, however it could help movie producers monitor how far down a state of intrigue is, or analysts look at how warming water may influence the soundness of a reef.

Alongside the apparatus itself, the Boxfish 360 accompanies six 64 GB small scale SD cards, a neoprene stockpiling sack, charger link, and a couple of other little instruments and new parts.

The Boxfish 360 is not for beginner occasion snaps: at a weighty cost of US$14,990 it's limited to the domain of expert video graphers and research organizations, with requests accessible for the following bunch because of ship mid-May. Whatever remains of us can appreciate the products of the work in the demo video underneath.
Photo

Post has attachment
Consumer-level gimbal stabilizers for DSLR-sized cameras area unit very solely regarding 3 years recent. however in those 3 years they've come back from US$4,500 all the way down to simply $599 with this Moza Air from Gusden, that stabilizes a a pair of.5-kg (5.5 lb) camera rig for four hours – however it'd have an important flaw.

Just 3 years past, DJI Innovations free the Ronin, a hand-held gimbal stabilizer that those folks while not movie-studio budgets may stick a good sized camera on and obtain Steadicam-style sleek footage while not the six-figure Steadicam tag.

The Ronin value $4,499, that was a very troubled worth at the time. however DJI and alternative firms area unit currently creating plenty of contrivance, primarily for camera drones, and also the costs have come back bally down. A Ronin M currently prices $999 and carries cameras up to three.6 kg (7.9 lb).

You can additionally get gadgets just like the DJI Osmo, with a inbuilt small-sensor 4K camera for $539, or any range of sub-$200 gimbal handles you'll stick a GoPro or smartphone onto for constant sleek motion result.
Joining the fray is that the Moza Air from Gudsen out of China, that holds a life-sized DSLR and lens jazz band up to a pair of.5 kg (5.5 lb) and will a lot of or less what the Ronin M will, for $599. to administer a rough plan of the carry capability, a Canon 5D Mk3 and 24-105 lens is a smaller amount than one.7 kg (3.7 lb).

There unit options a thumb grip with buttons to maneuver the gimbal up, down, left and right, still as protection or participating yaw or tilt-yaw follow modes, re-centering the camera or spinning it around into selfie mode. you furthermore may get one press start/stop recording button on the handle, that communicates with a variety of Canon, Sony and Panasonic DSLRs and small Four Thirds cameras.

The bottom of the handle could be a rack mount, therefore you'll sit the issue still, then dial in via Bluetooth on your smartphone to get super-slow movements for timelapse shots that pan or tilt systematically over the course of many minutes
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
4/1/17
5 Photos - View album
Wait while more posts are being loaded