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Colin McMillen
Works at Google
Attended Carnegie Mellon University
Lives in Boston
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Colin McMillen

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Percents and fractions are hard.
 
Use .33333 percent of your leap second this year to learn what a leap second is. Super meta.
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Precision is apparently also hard?
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1) This makes it crystal-clear that the 4 "liberal" justices always vote as a bloc, and therefore need exactly one "defector" from the other 5 to agree with them. Usually that is Kennedy, but twice it was Roberts, and once it was Thomas.

2) The Roberts-Alito-Scalia bloc is less consistent, but in 12 of the 15 cases, all three voted the same way.

3) I was surprised how often Thomas votes not-with-his-supposed-bloc — in 5/15 of the votes, he voted contrary to the majority opinion among {Roberts, Alito, Scalia}; and in the "Confederate Flag and Free Speech" case, his vote was the decisive one.
 
This website has a great summary of what the cases were, and who voted how. I found it really helpful in trying to figure out what was going on.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/us/major-supreme-court-cases-in-2015.html
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Some years ago the joke was that Clarence Thomas was in the conservative bloc unless porn was involved, in which case he was all for it.
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More photos from Cambridge city hall.
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You don't have to be a Supreme Court justice. Noone is forcing you to.
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Totally agree with +Jason Riek​​. This article articulates it well:

http://www.vox.com/2015/6/26/8851495/same-sex-marriage-scalia

While Scalia's warnings are eloquent, his actions routinely prove his point rather than heed it. On Thursday, for instance, Scalia's furious dissent lamented his inability to rip health insurance subsidies away from 6.4 million people because he had decided to forget how to read words in context.

The Supreme Court is one of the scariest entities in Washington; it's easy to forget on occasions when they just happen to be not-assholes by at least 5-4.
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Colin McMillen

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Google Ngram Viewer: '[jiggery - pokery]', 1800-2000 in English.
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I use it all the time, but I also use buncombe, gardyloo, charivari, and flapdoodle.
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Hooray for lumberjacks :)
 
"Scotland formed its own Women’s Timber Corps just a month after England's. Scottish women were recruited from age 17, though some ended up joining at ages as young as 14. The work of felling, operating sawmills, crosscutting, measuring logs, loading timber, and driving tractors was difficult labor, especially for young women with no experience at all in the field. The Women’s Timber Corps managed to keep the industry aloft with its roughly 5000 members (some estimates say it was closer to 8000) and ensured valuable timber supplies throughout the war."

I'd heard about Land Girls. And of course there were all the factory women. But this may be the first I've read about young women working in forestry, which was a critical wartime job when you think of all the wood needed for barracks and buildings and tent poles and so on. I've studied the history of the U.S. Forestry Services, and it really came into its own during the war.
During World War II, the Women's Timber Corps took over the forestry jobs of men who had joined the armed forces. The performed intense labor jobs and kept the timber industry afloat.
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Have them in circles
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Colin McMillen

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A thoughtful reply to a very important question.
 
No. It's not. 

The way the United States went after Islamic extremism was a moral and practical disaster: the government lashed out almost at random, imprisoning Muslims virtually at random, attacking countries with no connection to the problem at hand, and instituting mass surveillance programs that produced virtually no results. The orgy of misplaced state violence which occurred in the aftermath of 9/11 was a powerful statement against Islamic extremism -- but the state does not exist to make statements. 

Wars shouldn't happen simply to communicate that yes, we're taking this seriously. Arrests shouldn't happen simply to demonstrate a heightened level of suspicion. When states delegate the right to use violence on their behalf, those people to whom we've delegated have a responsibility to do what's effective, and what causes the least collateral damage, not what is most satisfying to those aggrieved by the state's failure to act.

I do not trust the laws which would empower the police to pursue white supremacists with omnipresent surveillance and indiscriminate violence. I do not trust the police implementing those laws to use them to the benefit of black Americans. I do not understand why anyone else would, other than -- perhaps -- as a metaphorical howl of despair that the official outlets of state violence can't be trusted to deploy that violence reasonably. 
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Well, folks. I'm finally back from my enforced blogging hiatus with a bit of a doozy. There were quite a number of trailers coming out of E3 this year featuring playable female characters, and while that definitely represents a shift in the right direction I also wanted to take a look at why these games are more of a mixed bag that it would seem at first glance.
Another E3 has come and gone! And it seems that, after the debacle of last year's E3, that developers are making a bit more of an effort to not fail at easily-preventable sexism. While still nowher...
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Apparently, being a mostly-straight, childless, dude still doesn't keep me from crying in public when the next generation displays signs of being empirically more awesome than their predecessors.
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Colin: I'm sorry I crapped up your lovely post. \:

Greg S: If you want to continue this discussion feel free to start a new post and add me.
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Progress, brought to you as always, via Justice Scalia's delicious delicious tears:

"The substance of today’s decree is not of immense per-sonal importance to me. The law can recognize as marriage whatever sexual attachments and living arrangements it wishes [...]"

Uh-huh. Noone believes you.

https://twitter.com/AP/status/614433508161921024
“BREAKING: Supreme Court says same-sex couples have right to marry in all 50 states.”
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With that 'hippie' line I can't help but picture Scalia as Nixon's Head from Futurama.
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Supreme Court upholds ObamaCare (again), 6–3. Scalia seems to need a lesson from Jurisprudence Doge: he devotes multiple paragraphs to the meaning of the word "such":

"Just as the Affordable Care Act directs States to establish Exchanges while allowing the Secretary to establish “such Exchange” as a fallback, the Elections Clause directs state legislatures to prescribe election regulations while allowing Congress to make “such Regulations” as a fallback. [...] The word “such” does not help the Court one whit."

such dissent
much jiggery-pokery
wow

http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/14-114_qol1.pdf
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Scalia's dissent was almost as long as the majority ruling in the same document:
http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/14-114_qol1.pdf

And +Bill Wendling  Scalia did use "jiggery-pokery", if that is any consolation... 
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Whoops.
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Fred S
 
Vuvuzels arts?
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Have them in circles
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Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Staff Software Engineer, 2009 - present
  • reCAPTCHA
    Co-Founder, 2007 - 2009
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Boston
Previously
Minneapolis - Pittsburgh - Tokyo
Story
Bragging rights
I proposed to my wife using obfuscated Perl code. My Erdős number is 4.
Education
  • Carnegie Mellon University
    Ph.D. Computer Science, 2003 - 2009
  • University of Minnesota
    B.S. Computer Science, 1999 - 2003
  • Robbinsdale Cooper High School
    1995 - 1999
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