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Colby Moorberg
994 followers -
Asst. professor of soil science, cyclist, outdoorsman, sports fan, homebrewer, and family man
Asst. professor of soil science, cyclist, outdoorsman, sports fan, homebrewer, and family man

994 followers
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This is easily my favorite +Chronicle of Higher Education article ever.

"The generally accepted formula is: P/D = 1. The "P" refers to proof (of the alcohol). The "D" is your specific dislike of this particular group of students on a scale of 1 to 100, with 100 being total unmitigated rage. For groups exceeding 100, a Bacardi 151 floater is acceptable."

Also, since when is drinking while grading a "lost art"? Most faculty I know never lost it.

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Need some help using the updated Google+ app for Android. How do I view posts in just one circle, and not all posts from all circles?

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20 day time lapse of earthworms at work. #IYS2015 #soil #bioturbation

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Here is the +Soil Science Society of America video for the #IYS2015 September theme: "Soils Support the Natural Environment"

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+Stacy Moorberg and I visited the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve yesterday with my brother, +Joe Moorberg and his fiance, Katie. We also stopped at the Konza Prairie Scenic lookout on the way. These are a few pics from the trip.
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Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve and the Konza Prairie Scenic Lookout
31 Photos - View album

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This quote from this +Newsweek article is why writing off a such a powerful technology as genetic modification of crops is a bad idea. Traditional breeding and agronomy alone will not fix the problems that are ahead. We are going to need every available tool in our toolbox to combat hunger and environmental problems in the future.

"The United Nations and experts say global food production will have to double by 2050, at which point the world population is expected to have grown from 7 billion today to well beyond 9 billion. That’s just 35 years away, and there will be no new arable land then. In fact, there probably will be less."
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