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Claire Farron
Attends Royal Holloway College, University of London
Lived in Egham, Surrey
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Claire Farron

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Whilst we've known about duplicate public/private key pairs for years (see [1]), the importance of what is being shown here is the scale of the duplication.

Nice work done by the +Information Security Group at +Royal Holloway University of London 

  #InformationSecurityGroupRHUL
  #RoyalHolloway  

[1] https://eprint.iacr.org/2012/064.pdf
 
Researchers from the Information Security Group from Royal Holloway, University of London, have discovered a slew of RSA encryption keys have been duplicated thousands of times, with one key having been utilized more than 28,000 times. The researchers... #cryptographickeys #encryption #exploits
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+Jim Topbloke  I think that this is a combination of incompetence by some users/administrators (including a sheer lack of awareness about what ot why they are implementing encryption), laziness by others that know better and a drive for functionality by business (meaning security is shunned as a severely limiting factor).
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Claire Farron

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O.o
 
boah, the #wifisense  feature sounds crazy, it shares the wifi key with all users contacts per default, be carefull with that!
Tell a pal your password ... and their FB mates will get access too
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I'd not be surprised if NSA came as one of your contact automatically.
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Claire Farron

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Reasonable guide actually.
 
A good pointers on disk encryption to share with your friends who are not comfortable with that
If you want to encrypt your hard disk, you should know the basics of what disk encryption protects, what it doesn't protect, and how to avoid common mistakes.
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I encrypted my PC for over a year, and all it caused were headaches, especially when I broke my OS by running a command I shouldn't have. The ability to experiment is one of the best things about Linux based operating systems, and since the only things of value on PC are things of sentimental value, I just don't see a need to encrypt my PC. If you can convince me that I need to encrypt my PCs, then I'm all ears, but I can't think of a reason why I would want to. If something really bad happens and you don't have a backup, encryption could potentially be your worst enemy.
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Claire Farron

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Oh dear...
 
"Only by attacking the fundamental nature of computing itself can the NSA hope to limit its adversaries' use of crypto. "
NSA director Michael S Rogers says his agency wants "front doors" to all cryptography used in the USA, so that no one can have secrets it can't spy on -- but what he really means is that he wants t...
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And if they're doing this to their own people, can you imagine what they're doing to the rest of us?!
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Claire Farron

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So, MATE 1.10.0 has been released today! Maybe it will be included in the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 15.04 distribution? \o/
MATE, one of the most lightweight and appreciated open source desktop environments used in numerous distributions of Linux, including Ubuntu MATE and Linux Mint, has reached today version 1.10.0, a released that introduces several new features and a great number of improvements.
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I wish they would spend more time making software we don't have instead of constantly remaking software we do have that already works perfectly fine.

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"The TL;DR is that based on this audit, Truecrypt appears to be a relatively well-designed piece of crypto software. The NCC audit found no evidence of deliberate backdoors, or any severe design flaws that will make the software insecure in most instances."
A few weeks back I wrote an update on the Truecrypt audit promising that we'd have some concrete results to show you soon. Thanks to some hard work by the NCC Crypto Services group, soon is now. We're grateful to Alex, Sean a...
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Claire Farron

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And just how are they going to enforce this one?
 
UK looking to ban encryptio with in weeks.
This sounds similar as the earlier story about Australia. Yet in Australia they want to ban teaching about encryption. But in UK they want to ban using it. Actually this kind of legalization will only affect honest people. Making something illegal hasn't ever stopped it.
#uk #ban #encryption #privacy #seucrity #british #unitedkingdom #snapchat #imessage #whatsapp #im #instantmessaging #apps #mobileapps #mobileapplication #illegal  
Popular instant messaging apps could soon be banned in the UK, owing to the strict laws on social media and online messaging services. The move comes as British Prime Minister David Cameron pushes ahead with new legislation that plans to…
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+Sami Lehtinen have you checked how many shootings there are in states that have gun control laws vs states that don't? 
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Claire Farron

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Oh this is amusing XD
 
"Sometimes I do things for no real reasons other than "because I can" and/or "it amuses me". For example, embedding a snarky message into my HTTPS certificate."
Sometimes I do things for no real reasons other than "because I can" and/or "it amuses me". For example, embedding a snarky message into my HTTPS certificate. Before I get into how this works, take a moment to admire the results: $ openssl s_client -connect rya.nc:443 2>/dev/null...
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Claire Farron

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If you're a WhatsApp user:
"As part of an article for c't magazine, the heise Security team investigated WhatsApp's end-to-end encryption. The results show that WhatsApp might use TextSecure's exemplary encryption designed by Moxie Marlinspike, but implements it in such a fashion that is of little use in the real world."
As part of an article for c't magazine, the heise Security team investigated WhatsApp's end-to-end encryption. The results show that WhatsApp might use TextSecure's exemplary encryption designed by Moxie Marlinspike, but implements it in such a fashion that is of little use in the real world.
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Claire Farron

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How you get around encryption?

For those of us in the UK, let's take a moment to be sad because of RIPA, Section 49 [1].

[1] http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/23/section/49
 
"Let's pretend that encryption backdoors are a great idea. From a purely technical point of view, what do we need to do to implement them, and how achievable is it?"
They say that history repeats itself, first as tragedy, then as farce. Never has this principle been more apparent than in this new piece by Washington Post reporters Ellen Nakashima and Barton Gellman: 'As encryption spreads...
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I live in UK, home to RIPA, one of the most draconian laws regarding disclosing encryption keys and the like world-wide.

If I'm not mistaken, you should be looking at RIPA, Section 49 [1].

[1] http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/23/section/49
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Claire Farron

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Side channel attack on trezor bitcoin wallet with a cheap oscilloscope 
Extracting the Private Key from a TREZOR with a 70 $ Oscilloscope
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Why am I not surprised?
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Claire Farron

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Gostaria que você me informasse em Português para entender melhor. OBS. Please take to me in Portuguese..than you may dear.MAG 
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Egham, Surrey
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Loving Linux and Slaying the Undead :D
Introduction

I am Claire, just finished my second degree in Mathematics and going onto a Masters in Information Security (second Masters, third degree) in September.

Oh and guys, if you're following me in the hope of snagging a hot chick, forget it. I'm not interested.

Education
  • Royal Holloway College, University of London
    MSc Information Security, 2014 - present
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Female