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Cindy Brown
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I was going to edit the previous one, but realized it's probably still set to extended circles since I created it before changing it. (I'm not entirely sure what happens with default value posts when you change the default value.)

Oh hai.

Comments are public on my posts. However, many of my posts are closed entirely to comments (particularly the political ones) because I have neither the time nor the inclination to deal with flame fests.

I ain't here for that.

I'm here because I think there's a lot of really cool stuff out there to share and I'm the sort of person who thinks out loud on the 'net. I've been online since the late 80's so I've seen a lot of stuff online and I'm at the point where I just go with what I like because ain't nobody got time for anything else.

If you don't like it, then don't follow me.
If you saw it on What's Hot, that's nice. If you didn't like it, too bad so sad, move along to the next post.

I have no control over a post of mine popping up in your stream. Either you followed me & you can unfollow me, or you decided to look through Explore -- and YOU can stop doing that if you don't like what you find. Either way, there's nothing I did to appear in your stream.

(You'd be surprised at how many people whine that I'm in their streamz, killin' their buzz.)

I tend to be interested in politics, tech stuff (I'm a linux admin among other things), feminism, LGBT, and whatever else catches my fancy. I read a lot, and am writing a fantasy series which I might eventually publish as an indie.

That said, there's lots of cool people here and I look forward to meeting you!

Oh, probably also a good place to list a few links.

I collect my bookmarks at <https://pinboard.in/u:browneyedgirl65>
You can find, for example, most of the articles I've shared on the current campaign at <https://pinboard.in/u:browneyedgirl65/t:campaign2016/> and there's many more tags besides.

I'm on twitter: <https://twitter.com/browneyedgirl65>
 
Quick note. I have comments on my posts set to extended circles and have done so for at least six months or so.

ETA It seems Google is preparing to remove or revise? extended circles fairly soon, given changes on the G+ app (see comment stream) although settings are still available on desktop. So I don't know exactly what I will do in the near future. I'll pin another post when I do change things.

--

Now, how that works exactly is a bit of a mystery. I would think this would mean that anyone who is in the circles of anyone in my circles should be able to comment. In effect, trusting those in my circles to in turn have reasonable people in their circles. I actually circle only a very small number of people, because I read most everything in my stream.

I do this to cut down on random psychos, drive by comments, harrassment, Trump supporters and other drivel.

It doesn't always seem to work the way it should, though. I have no idea why. If we have people in common and you can't seem to leave comments, then do feel free to reshare this post (that will notify me-- I hope-- or just strike up a convo with me in a mutual friend's thread) with an inquiry. Or ask someone here in the comments to plus you into the thread.

Oh, also I have a tendency to close comments altogether if the topic is Hillary Clinton. This is an outgrowth of the rather bitter intraparty fight between Sanders and Clinton supporters and I'm uninterested in hosting any of that on my threads.

I do wish I could set comment permissions on a case by case basis, but G+ doesn't give us that option, so I'm sticking with the somewhat oddball extended circles setting.
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+Cindy Brown the first thing I ever did with that torch was make a spaceship-crash-in-progress scene.

Gelatin stinks when you light it on fire. Fondant at least smells vaguely like roasting marshmallows, but gelatin is nasty.
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I have thoughts about this. I think the Dem party does address these (or wants to address these) issues. Watching Obama's address (still working my way through it in 10 minute increments which is about all I can take of autocaptioning at a time) I think that desire is clear, as when he says "We've still got more work to do: more work to do for every American still in need of a good job, or a raise, paid leave or a decent retirement, for every child who needs a sturdier ladder out of poverty, or world-class education for everyone who has not yet felt the progress of these past seven and a half years.", and "There are pockets of America that never recovered from factory closures, men who took pride in hard work and providing for their families who now feel forgotten, parents who wonder whether their kids will have the same opportunities that they had: all of that is real [and] we are challenged to do better, to be better".

And setting aside the standard 25% or so of his supporters who are clearly as crazy as he is, we're left with people who would actually be better off under Democrat policies than the last 40 years of Republican policies still breaking for Trump and the trick is to understand why.

It's easy enough to say that they are a small minority, generally dying off. But I think that's counter to what we want to be, as a party, and as a nation. Without making any excuse for racism, misogyny, or homophobia, there's some things to consider.

The US is bifurcated into two (actually a few more, but at the highest level only two). There are the “elites” and there is everyone else. These two Americas are segregated, culturally, socially, geographically, and economically. They have gotten more segregated over the last 40 years.

The growing income inequality is one measure of this. Yet it is more than that. The elites have removed themselves physically. They cluster in certain towns (NYC, LA, Northern Virginia, Boston) and within those towns in certain neighborhoods. They dress differently. They eat differently. There is a culture of elitism.

The best single measure of elitism I see is education, the type and amount. A Harvard professor of sociology is more similar (despite different politics) to a Wall Street trader, than either is to a truck driver in Appleton, Wisconsin, or a waitress in Selma, or a construction worker in Detroit.

If you earn your money using your intellect (like Jonathan Chait), you score high on elitism, and you probably view the world very differently from a man driving heavy equipment in Birmingham, Alabama, who uses his body for labor. Or a guy flipping burgers in the Bronx.

I do realize that just by being on G+, you're probably already in this category...

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Trump voters may not vote the way I want them to, but, after having spent the last five years working in (and having grown up in) parts of the US few visit, I know they are not dumb.
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More from Propane Jane at twitter.

Ever stop to think that maybe you're so ignorant about what she's done bc her life's work has been helping people who don't look like you?

You'll need to click through to read through the multiple tweet comment. I found it a very interesting read.

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Here we go. (Auto) captioned clip of Obama's speech at the DNC July 27th 2016.

What we heard [in Cleveland] was a deeply pessimistic vision of a country where we turn against each other and turn away from the rest of the world. There were no serious solutions to pressing problems -- just the fan of resentment and blame and anger and hate and that is not the America I know.

The America I know is full of courage and optimism and ingenuity. The America I know is decent and generous.

This is full of good stuff. I liked this one as well.

I've traveled this country through all 50 states as I have rejoiced with you and mourned with you. What I have seen more than anything is what is right with America. I see people working hard and starting businesses. I see people teaching kids and serving our country. I see engineers inventing stuff, doctors coming up with new cures. I see a younger generation full of energy and new ideas not constrained by what is, but ready to seize what ought to be. And most of all I see Americans of every party, every background, every faith who believe that we are stronger together: black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American, young, old, gay, straight, men, women, folks with disabilities -- all pledging allegiance under the same proud flag to this big bold country that we love. That's what I see.
[corrected transcript the best I could w/lipreading]

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Since each violation of copyright in this case allows the plaintiff to seek damages up to $25,000, the statutory damages for Getty’s 18,755 violations amount to $468,875,000. But because the company was found to have violated the same copyright law within the past three years — in 2013, Daniel Morel was awarded $1.2 million in a suit against Getty, after the agency pulled his photos from Twitter and distributed them without permission to several major publications — Highsmith can elect to seek three times that amount: hence the $1 billion suit.

Go, Highsmith!
 
In December, documentary photographer Carol Highsmith received a letter from Getty Images accusing her of copyright infringement for featuring one of her own photographs on her own website. It demanded payment of $120. This was how Highsmith came to learn that stock photo agencies Getty and Alamy had been sending similar threat letters and charging fees to users of her images, which she had donated to the Library of Congress for use by the general public at no charge.

Now, Highsmith has filed a $1 billion copyright infringement suit against both Alamy and Getty for “gross misuse” of 18,755 of her photographs. “The defendants [Getty Images] have apparently misappropriated Ms. Highsmith’s generous gift to the American people,” the complaint reads. “[They] are not only unlawfully charging licensing fees … but are falsely and fraudulently holding themselves out as the exclusive copyright owner.” According to the lawsuit, Getty and Alamy, on their websites, have been selling licenses for thousands of Highsmith’s photographs, many without her name attached to them and stamped with “false watermarks.”

Since 1988, Highsmith has been donating tens of thousands of photographs of people and places in the United States to the Library of Congress, making them free for public use. The institution calls the donation “one of the greatest acts of generosity in the history of the Library.” The Carol M. Highsmith Collection is featured in the library’s Prints & Photographs Division, alongside the likes of Dorothea Lange’s Dust Bowl and Depression photographs.
In December, documentary photographer Carol Highsmith received a letter from Getty Images accusing her of copyright infringement for featuring one of her own photographs on her own website.
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Good for her. I hope she beats the pants off of them.
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This I actually agree with. This is changing the Democratic party around. I think it's too bad he's not staying in the party like he said before, but I think the Democratic party is the better for his having run.

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He could have conceded long before, and people — the media — were asking every time we saw them, "When are you going to concede? When are you going to endorse?" That was difficult, because we stayed in as long as we could to use as much leverage as we could to get everything we possibly could get, including the rules committee, where we rethink how we run these elections.

He's not going to win the presidency, we've known that since June 7th [the day of the last big primaries, in California and New Jersey], but we had to do as much as we possibly could on the issues to honor all of the work that so many people have done, and that we did.
Bernie Sanders' wife, Jane, discusses her proudest and most difficult campaign moments, the DNC email leak and the future of his revolution.
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And now the other half of Trumpism is the "BernieOrBust" phenomenon whereby we see people who were for Sanders now declaring they'll vote for Trump before they vote for Clinton.

Now, their numbers are small. At least 75% and up to 90% of Sanders supporters will vote for Clinton in the end.

I even remember a similar dynamic, when Clinton supporters in 2008 angrily declared they'd vote for anyone other than Obama, only to eventually vote for him in the national election.

But I do understand the line of reasoning. It goes something like this. The narrative is that the Democratic party is so corrupt, that if Clinton is elected, that only reinforces and encourages the corrupt behavior. Therefore, they feel they must vote against Clinton (either for Trump or Stein, though it hardly makes a difference which one) to break things up. The failure of the Democratic party at this point would cause them to reform and be better in four (or perhaps eight) years.

I disagree with this line of reasoning though, and I'll tell you why: It didn't work in 2000 and it didn't work in 2004. By the above line of reasoning, losing Gore and then electing Bush a second time should have completely revamped the Democratic party from top to bottom.

But if you're complaining about the Democratic party now, then clearly that did not happen back then. So, no. I don't agree with this line of reasoning.

The other interesting thing I see is how much vociferous objection to Clinton is not also teamed with the same objection to Obama. Why not? She is a solid continuance of Obama's work. Yet this point rarely comes up.

What's really weird is the way opposition to TPP gets framed all too frequently. (Disclaimer: I don't approve of TPP the way it is structured now -- I'd like to see a LOT of changes to it. However, I think some kind of transnational trade agreement is inevitable, so I welcome the continued objections to it, to perhaps get a much better framework on it.) Look, Obama supports the TPP. And at present, the GOP establishment -- which controls Senate and House -- approves of it. That's a pretty dangerous combination for the next four months or so. Finally, the Dem establishment is against it (cf Warren, Sanders, etc).

If TPP is not approved in that timeframe (and I hope it is not), what are the possibilities?

We might have Trump (who says he is against TPP) plus GOP establishment Congress (which is for TPP). If Trump wins, we're unlikely to have Democrat control of either branch. Will this combination be enough to pass TPP? Remember that it Congress that makes the trade deals and such, though the president can come out for or against details.

We have Clinton who as best as I can tell has a similar stance to TPP that I do, but has more recently come out against it. If she is elected, along with a Dem Congress, then the odds of getting an improved TPP or no TPP have just gone way up.

Anyway, just some random thoughts from yours truly. I want to return later to that subset of white blue-collar Trump supporters, though.

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Hispanic Racial Identification by U.S. State, 2010 Census Data Note: Hispanics are not considered a “race” by the US Census, but instead a “national origin”. So Hispanics can identify as a member of...
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+Rod Mesa in San Jose, it's the same. For all California pretends otherwise.
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#lgbt

Unlike her opponent, who would be happy to let Vladimir Putin do whatever he wants, no matter how evil, Clinton has taken a tough line on Russia’s repressive policies, particularly when it comes to the gay community. “What Putin’s doing in Russia with all these laws against the LGBT community… is just a cynical political ploy,” Clinton has said, adding that as Secretary of State she got into “shouting matches” with top Russian officials. No wonder that Putin has thrown the weight of the Russian media behind Trump.

I had no idea. You go, girl.

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Hillary Clinton has taken some well-earned lumps for her caution on marriage equality and other issues. Clinton is an inherently cautious politician, but then again, if you were targeted by right-wing nutburgers (and a certain presidential candida...
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"Time is on my side, yes it is."
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It's subconscious +Cindy Brown​, when someone highlights inequality, the people from the privileged group will often pay attention to anything but the inequality. +Emlyn O'Regan​ was just making a joke, but an innocent joke that took attention away from the point of the post. Actually, he pointed out economic inequality. Another issue, one he can probably relate to more than being female, or black, but again, not the point of this post. These natural reactions do need to be called out though, or we're all just fighting our battles on our own with no understanding from others. 
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This is a very interesting article, and I think I'm going to reconsider how I use this collection from here on out. It may infuriate folks following me who don't care for Clinton, of course.

But take a look at this. (Bolds are mine.)

There is no middle in American politics. There are moderates, but there is no ideology of the moderate, no single ideology that all moderates agree on. A moderate conservative has some progressive positions on issues, though they vary from person to person. Similarly, a moderate progressive has some conservative positions on issues, again varying from person to person. In short, moderates have both political moral worldviews, but mostly use one of them. Those two moral worldviews in general contradict each other. How can they reside in the same brain at the same time?

Both are characterized in the brain by neural circuitry. They are linked by a commonplace circuit: mutual inhibition. When one is turned on the other is turned off; when one is strengthened, the other is weakened. What turns them on or off? Language that fits that worldview activates that worldview, strengthening it, while turning off the other worldview and weakening it. The more Trump’s views are discussed in the media, the more they are activated and the stronger they get, both in the minds of hardcore conservatives and in the minds of moderate progressives.

This is true even if you are attacking Trump’s views. The reason is that negating a frame activates that frame, as I pointed out in the book Don’t Think of an Elephant! It doesn’t matter if you are promoting Trump or attacking Trump, you are helping Trump.

We know that Trump likes ANY publicity. He's not picky.

A good example of Trump winning with progressive biconceptuals includes certain unionized workers. Many union members are strict fathers at home or in their private life. They believe in “traditional family values” — a conservative code word — and they may identify with winners.

Why has Trump won the Republican nomination? Look at all the conservative groups he appeals to!

[...]

I recently heard a brilliant and articulate Clinton surrogate argue against a group of Trump supporters that Trump has presented no policy plans for increasing jobs, increasing economics growth, improving education, gaining international respect, etc. This is the basic Clinton campaign argument. Hillary has the experience, the policy know-how, she can get things done, it’s all on her website. Trump has none of this. What Hillary’s campaign says is true. And it is irrelevant.

Trump supporters and other radical Republican extremists could not care less, and for a good reason. Their job is to impose their view of strict father morality in all areas of life. If they have the Congress, and the Presidency and the Supreme Court, they could achieve this. They don’t need to name policies, because the Republicans already of hundreds of policies ready to go. They just need to be in complete power.

There's more at the link.

This dovetails with other things such as if you want to get people out to vote, research shows the best way to do so is to go positive and imply everyone's voting, don't you want to vote too, etc.

Obviously, my personal strategy here isn't going to make or break things. I'm not even a small fish in a big ocean, I'm a damn copepod. But on a personal level, I think I'll be much happier spending less time stomping on Trump.


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Maybe not, but between the strict father versus nurturant parent (which he's also been saying) and the lack of subconscious negation, that does get us most of the way there.
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Cindy's Collections
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AKA browneyedgirl65
Introduction
IF YOU ARE CONFUSED AS TO WHO I AM, THIS IS BROWNEYEDGIRL65, AKA BEG, BEG65, etc, AS KNOWN ON LIVEJOURNAL, DISQUS, TWITTER, PINBOARD.IN, AND MY BLOG, WHATSTHATYOUSAID.NET

I can be reached at gmail via the above handle.

I am also the author of the Palindrome Prayer :-) (-:

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Instant human: Just add coffee.

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The avatar I use, with kind permission, is by Sarah Cloutier, melukilan at deviantart.  You can find the original artwork at her gallery.

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I used to write a good deal about being deaf at my Livejournal blog, particularly under the deafhood tag.
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"Get ready for a large file transfer." (Agent Coulson, Agents of SHIELD, S1E21)

"I hate it when people don't know the difference between ur and u'r" (@blainecapatch, twitter)

“Dawn take you all, and be stone to you!” For just at that moment the light came over the hill, and there was a mighty twitter in the branches. William never spoke for he stood turned to stone as he stooped; and Bert and Tom were stuck like rocks as they looked at him. And there they stand to this day, all alone, unless the birds perch on them; for trolls, as you probably know, must be underground before dawn, or they go back to the stuff of the mountains they are made of, and never move again. (“The Hobbit,” J.R.R. Tolkien)

But I'll never be convinced to except except for accept, accept I get a really good explanation. (Me)

Most people don't even know what sysadmins do, but trust me, if they all took a lunch break at the same time they wouldn't make it to the deli before you ran out of bullets protecting your canned goods from roving bands of mutants. (Peter Welch, Programming Sucks)

Life has got a habit of not standing hitched. You got to ride it like you find it. You got to change with it. If a day goes by that don't change some of your old notions for new ones, that is just about like trying to milk a dead cow.  (Woody Guthrie)

California scent with a hint of sanity.
(bot generated email text-fu)

Farpotshket (yiddish): Something that is all fouled up, especially as the result of attempts to fix it; repeatedly making something worse while trying to fix it.

"I know CNN has taken some knocks lately, but the fact is I admire their commitment to cover all sides of a story, just in case one of them happens to be accurate." (Barack Obama, April 2013)

"And on the third day, the skies darkened, and a swarm of assholes descended from the clouds; and not a person could withstand them, but they were covered in the filth of the Internet."  (+Yonatan Zunger , 13 Apr 2013) 

"I never meant to say that the Conservatives are generally stupid. I meant to say that stupid people are generally Conservative. I believe that is so obviously and universally admitted a principle that I hardly think any gentleman will deny it." (John Stuart Mill, 1866)

"Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay." (Robert Frost)

"Few things are stronger than
The mind's need for diverse
Experience.
I am glad
Not many men or women can remain
Faithful lovers to the unreal." (The Gift: Poems by Hafiz the Great Sufi Master)

"wine; talk; touch; unzip; touch; strip; gasp; finger; gasp; mount; fsck; more; yes; gasp; umount; make clean; sleep" (Unix)

They are facing not a theory but a condition, for that they are first, last and all the time the people of the eye. (George Veditz, 1910)

"Most people are prisoners, thinking only about the future or living in the past. They are not in the present, and the present is where everything begins." (Carlos Santana)

"Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes hurtling down the highway."  (Andrew S. Tanenbaum)

"I don’t understand people who dislike reading because I think all that free time means they’re up to no good." (frau sally benz on the 'net)

"Solitude is impractical and yet society is fatal." (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." (Plato)

"It always seemed to me a bit pointless to disapprove of homosexuality. It's like disapproving of rain." (Francis Maude)

"If I Said The Sky Was Blue, They Would Say No." (President Obama)

Honi soit qui mal y pense.

“You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.” (James D. Miles)

The Oxford philosopher JL Austin once observed in a lecture that in English a double negative implied a positive meaning, whereas no language had been found in which a double positive implied a negative meaning. To which Sidney Morgenbesser responded in a dismissive tone, "Yeah, yeah."

"People who dismiss the unemployed and dependent as 'parasites' fail to understand economics and parasitism. A successful parasite is one that is not recognized by its host, one that can make its host work for it without appearing as a burden. Such is the ruling class in a capitalist society." (Jason Read)

"But that's -- I'm sorry, but that's completely ridiculous! How can I possibly prove it doesn't exist? Do you expect me to get hold of -- of all the pebbles in the world and test them? I mean, you could claim that anything's real if the only basis for believing in it is that nobody's proved it doesn't exist!" (Hermione Granger)

To put it another way: The First Amendment guarantees a right to speech. It does not guarantee a right to respect. (+John Scalzi)

So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing. (T. S. Eliot)

A well educated and organized citizenry being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and use the Internet shall not be infringed. (+David Landry)

The truth is that male religious leaders have had -- and still have -- an option to interpret holy teachings either to exalt or subjugate women.  They have, for their own selfish ends, overwhelmingly chosen the latter.  Their continuing choice provides the foundation or justification for much of the pervasive persecution and abuse of women throughout the world.  (Jimmy Carter)

The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men
Gang aft agley
(Robert Burns)

What I like about April Fool’s Day: One day a year we’re asking whether news stories are true. It should be all 365. (Prentiss Riddle, April 1, 2008 @pzriddle)

He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me. (Thomas Jefferson)

Coffee is the best thing to douse the sunrise with.  (Drew Sirtors)

In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer. (Albert Camus)

I am the light that shines over all things. I am everything. From me all came forth, and to me all return. Split a piece of wood, and I am there. Lift a stone, and you will find me there. (Gospel of Thomas)

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.  (Mark Twain)
Bragging rights
I have been on the Internet since the late 80's. I've survived 2400bps modems, Usenet, IRC, Winsocks & Trumpet, Mosaic, all of it. So believe me when I say it's all been done, it's all been done before.
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browneyedgirl65
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Rail against anything completely inane, which seems to be most things