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Cindy Brown
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This is brilliant.
Liberated from a private share and liberated from Upworthy.
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They're just eating their own at this point.
Residents in some Wake County communities are upset after finding a flier from the Ku Klux Klan in their yards Monday morning.
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+D. Hale To be honest, being an Anglophone in Quebec exposes you to a lot of discrimination and monocultural thinking.
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Backup was my bread and butter for a great many years.

I still remember being asked on one occasion, "Are our backups any good?" I had to answer, "Honestly, I don't know. I hope so, but I don't know." Took me six months to get that particular backup system into good enough shape that my answer could become "Probably" (for exactly that reason mentioned in the original post.)

Then there was the customer that absolutely had to move its SAP logs offsite - on tape - every three hours. Which invariably meant that their DR strategy became utterly useless, because to restore the main database, you needed this set of tapes, with this backup of the backup system's database; but to restore the logs, you needed that set of tapes, with that backup of the backup system's database - you couldn't just restore the backup system and expect it to work.

I pointed this out. They didn't care enough to fix the problem...
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Poke salad. Yums.
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:poke: :poke: I want some. :-)
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There is nothing I can add to Yonatan's commentary here.

That flag there is a complete disgrace.
 
The perpetrator of yesterday's terrorist strike was captured a few hours ago, and the bodies of the dead have not yet been buried, and already I'm seeing a refrain pop up in news coverage and in people's comments: How do we understand this killer? What made him turn out this way? Was he mentally ill, was he on drugs, was he abused, was he influenced by someone in his life? Were his motivations about politics, religion, personal relationships, psychological? We can't form opinions about why he did this yet; we shouldn't assume that, just because [insert thing here], it was about race.

You might mistake this, at first, for a genuine interest in understanding the motivations that would turn a young man into a terrorist and a mass murderer. But when other kinds of terrorists -- say, Muslims from Afghanistan -- commit atrocities, the very same people who are asking these questions are asking completely different ones: Why are Muslims so violent? What is it in Islam that makes them so prone to hating America, hating Christianity, hating Freedom?

I think that there are two, very important, things going on here. The more basic one is that, when terrorists are from a group you've never met, it's far easier to ascribe their behavior to the whole group; if it's from a group you know, and you know that the average member of that group isn't malicious or bloodthirsty, then people start asking individual questions. 

But the more important one is that the group that this terrorist belonged to was not merely familiar: it's the same group to which most of the people asking the questions belong. Not merely the same broad group -- "Muslims" and "Christians" are groups of over a billion people each, groups far too broad to have any deep commonalities -- but a far narrower group, a group with a common culture. And there's a reason that people don't want to ask "What is it about this group that caused it:" because in this case, there's a real answer.

The picture you see below is of the Confederate flag which the state of South Carolina flies on the grounds of its state house, and has ever since 1962. (That's 1962, not 1862: it was put there in response to the Civil Rights movement, not to the Civil War) Today, all of the state flags in that state are at half mast; only the Confederate flag is flying at full mast.

The state government itself is making explicit its opinion on the matter: while there may be formal mourning for the dead, this is a day when the flag of white supremacy can fly high. When even the government, in its formal and official behavior, condones this, can we really be surprised that terrorists are encouraged? (Terrorists, plural, as this is far from an isolated incident; even setting aside the official and quasi-official acts of governments, the history of terror attacks and even pogroms in this country is utterly terrifying)

Chauncey DeVega asked some excellent questions in his article at Salon (http://goo.gl/3AZWy7); among them,

1. What is radicalizing white men to commit such acts of domestic terrorism and mass shootings? Are Fox News and the right-wing media encouraging violence?

6. When will white leadership step up and stop white right-wing domestic terrorism?

7. Is White American culture pathological? Why is White America so violent?

8. Are there appropriate role models for white men and boys? Could better role models and mentoring help to prevent white men and boys from committing mass shootings and being seduced by right-wing domestic terrorism?

The callout of Fox News in particular is not accidental: they host more hate-filled preachers and advocates of violence, both circuitous and explicit, than Al Jazeera. 

There is a culture which has advocated, permitted, protected, and enshrined terrorists in this country since its founding. Its members and advocates are not apologetic in their actions; they only complain that they might be "called racist," when clearly they aren't, calling someone racist is just a way to shut down their perfectly reasonable conversation and insult them, don't you know?

No: This is bullshit, plain and simple. It is a culture which believes that black and white Americans are not part of the same polity, that they must be kept apart, and that the blacks must be and remain subservient. That robbing or murdering them is permissible, that quiet manipulations of the law to make sure that "the wrong people" don't show up in "our neighborhoods," or take "our money," or otherwise overstep their bounds, are not merely permissible, but the things that we do in order to keep society going. That black faces and bodies are inherently threatening, and so both police and private citizens have good reason to be scared when they see them, so that killing them -- whether they're young men who weren't docile enough at a traffic stop or young children playing in the park -- is at most a tragic, but understandable, mistake.

I have seen this kind of politics before. I watch a terrorist attack on a black church in Charleston, and it gives me the same fear that I get when I see a terrorist attack against a synagogue: the people who come after one group will come after you next.

This rift -- this seeing our country as being built of two distinct polities, with the success of one having nothing to do with the success of the other or of the whole -- is the poison which has been eating at the core of American society for centuries. It is the origin of our most bizarre laws, from weapons laws to drug policies to housing policy, and to all of the things which upon rational examination appear simply perverse. How many of the laws which seem to make no sense make perfect sense if you look at them on the assumption that their real purpose is to enforce racial boundaries? I do not believe that people are stupid: I do not believe that lawmakers pass laws that go against their stated purpose because they can't figure that out. I believe that they pass laws, and that people encourage and demand laws, because consciously or subconsciously, they know what kind of world they will create.

We tend to reserve the word "white supremacy" for only the most extreme organizations, the ones who are far enough out there that even the fiercest "mainstream" advocates of racism can claim no ties to them. But that, ultimately, is bullshit as well. This is what it is, this is the culture which creates, and encourages, and coddles terrorists. And until we have excised this from our country, it will poison us every day.

First and foremost, what we need to do is discuss it. If there's one thing I've seen, it's that discussing race in my posts is the most inflammatory thing I could possibly do: people become upset when I mention it, say I'm "making things about race" or trying to falsely imply that they're racists or something like that. 

When there's something you're afraid to discuss, when there's something that upsets you when it merely comes onto the table: That's the thing you need to talk about. That's the thing that has to come out there, in the open.

We've entered a weird phase in American history where overt statements of racism are forbidden, so instead people go to Byzantine lengths to pretend that that isn't what it is. But that just lets the worm gnaw deeper. Sunshine is what lets us move forward.

And the flag below? So long as people can claim with a straight face that this is "just about heritage," that it isn't somehow a blatant symbol of racism, we know that there is bullshit afloat in our midst.

The flag itself needs to come down; not with ceremony, it simply needs to be taken down, burned, and consigned to the garbage bin.
"The stars and bars promised lynching, police violence against protestors and others. And violence against churches."
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Cindy Brown

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Is everybody up?

Good morning. What's shakin'?
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Nothing like a good stiff one in the morning.

DRINK. Stiff DRINK. (Geez.)
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Cindy Brown

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Completely awesome.
 
Bigot gives a Girl Scouts chapter $100k, on condition that they not use it for transgender girls.

The chapter sends it back, and sets up an IndieGogo to raise replacement funds.

That was yesterday. As of this moment, the IndieGogo has received over $120k, with 29 days left to go. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/girl-scouts-is-foreverygirl

Bigots, eat Internet.

(The GS had already announced a policy of welcoming trans* girls, back in May. I suspect the bigot knew this, and was essentially trying to use their imagined avarice to get them to change their minds. Guess what: not everyone thinks that way. In fact, I think most people don't.)

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I'd call this a "jiu-jitsu" move on the part of the GS -- use the enemy's strength against them.
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YES!

Who are you and what have you done with SCOTUS? Keep 'em!
 
Victory at last. Love is love.

The Fourteenth Amendment requires a State to license a marriage between two people of the same sex and to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out-of-State.
In a landmark decision, the Supreme Court makes marriage for same-sex couples legal nationwide. NBC's Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie, Pete Williams and Chuck Todd report.
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+paul beard I have talked about doing away with lifetime appointments for Federal Judges for a long time. I understand the reasoning for them when set up. The aim was depoliticizing judgeships but in today's political arena that reasoning is a non-starter. I would suggest staggering appointments with Ten year terms.

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Cindy Brown

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MY SPINE!
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I find it's always safe to assume that if I've seen a picture of large, happy pussies it's been on +Cindy Brown's page.

> . >
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More ugliness.
 
I think that some profoundly stupid ideas need to be cleared up, here. ABC interviewed Joey Meek, roommate of Charleston terrorist Dylann Roof. Meek gives us this line:

“He never said the n-word, he never made racial slurs, he never targeted a specific black person. He never did any of that so it was just pretty much a shock.”

Meek also said "He wanted segregation... he wanted something big, like Trayvon Martin. He wanted something to spark up the race war again... He said that he thought that blacks, the blacks in general as a race, was bringing down the white race.”

Just as a hint for the wise: Being a racist doesn't mean "saying the n-word," making racial slurs, or targeting a specific person. There seems to be something in the water lately that makes it possible for people to get up and explain how they aren't racist -- apparently because they never use that one word -- even while they're in favor of segregation, or think that the two races just ought to keep away from each other, or wouldn't want someone like that in their community.

But it's also not a particularly hard guess, even from these few moments of listening to Meek, that he didn't see anything particularly wrong with what his roommate was saying. Most people generally don't refer to "the race war" in casual conversation; it's not a phrase that exactly trips off the tongue if you aren't using it pretty often.

Meek also says that Roof wasn't a member of any hate groups. (Something which I'll believe after seeing a police investigation) But he (and per the report, other of Roof's friends as well) also says that Roof had been planning the attack for over six months -- a fact which he didn't bother to mention to anyone until now.

If you're planning a terrorist attack with the knowledge of your friends for six months, and they have a pretty good idea of what you're up to and why, you know what we call that sort of thing?

Well, apart from an ad hoc terrorist organization, someone may want to explain the idea of "accessory before the fact" (SC code of laws, 16-1-40) to Meek and his buddies. Hopefully the FBI will act on that fairly strongly: for all that this is an ad hoc and kind of bumbling-sounding group, it's also a group of like-minded individuals that have carried out at least one multi-fatality terrorist attack. The odds are good that they know more, and about more, and the offer of getting a mere multi-year vacation at federal expense (as opposed to what they're potentially up against under SC's accomplice statute, which would be the chair) may be a good way to get that information out of them -- and get them off the streets for good.

(Incidentally, for those who listen to the video and ask themselves how seriously one could really take a terrorist organization whose members are obviously idiots: seriously enough for them to murder nine people. Contrary to what you may expect, most terrorist organizations actually are run by idiots, just like most crimes are actually committed by idiots. It turns out that people with brains and something useful to do with their lives rarely spend their time trying to murder people as a political statement. The brilliant, cunning master terrorist, or the murderer who sets up an incredibly sophisticated chain of clues, makes for great television but isn't actually the usual case.)
A friend of accused Charleston church shooter claims that the suspect had spoken about how he was angered by the uproar over the Trayvon Martin shooting and “wanted something to spark up the race war again.” Joey Meek, a childhood friend of suspect Dylann Roof, told ABC News that he last saw his...
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Um.
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And Google suggested I might like to translate "Um" into another language...
I'm sure all their suggestions are appropriate.
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Very impressive:

"WHEN Estonia regained its independence in 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, less than half its population had a telephone line and its only independent link to the outside world was a Finnish mobile phone concealed in the foreign minister's garden. Two decades later, it is a world leader in technology. Estonian geeks developed the code behind Skype and Kazaa (an early file-sharing network). In 2007 it became the first country to allow online voting in a general election. It has among the world’s zippiest broadband speeds and holds the record for start-ups per person. Its 1.3m citizens pay for parking spaces with their mobile phones and have their health records stored in the digital cloud. Filing an annual tax return online, as 95% of Estonians do, takes about five minutes. How did the smallest Baltic state develop such a strong tech culture?

The foundation was laid in 1992 when Mart Laar, Estonia’s prime minister at the time, defibrillated the flat-lining economy. In less than two years his young government (average age: 35) gave Estonia a flat income-tax, free trade, sound money and privatisation. New businesses could be registered smoothly and without delays, an important spur for geeks lying in wait. Feeble infrastructure, a legacy of the Soviet era, meant that the political class began with a clean sheet. When Finland decided to upgrade to digital phone connections, it offered its archaic 1970s analogue telephone-exchange to Estonia for free. Estonia declined the proposal and built a digital system of its own. Similarly, the country went from having no land registry to creating a paperless one. “We just skipped certain things…Mosaic [the first popular web browser] had just come out and everyone was on a level playing field,” recalls Toomas Hendrik Ilves, the president. Not saddled with legacy technology, the country's young ministers put their faith in the internet.

A nationwide project to equip classrooms with computers followed and by 1998 all schools were online. In 2000, when the government declared internet access to be a human right, the web spread into the boondocks. Free Wi-Fi became commonplace. Rubber stamps, carbon paper and long queues gave way to “e-government”. The private sector followed: the sale of Skype to eBay in 2005, for $2.6 billion, created a new class of Estonian investors, who made tens of millions of euros from their shareholdings—and have been putting their experience, and their windfalls, to good use. Today Tehnopol, a business hub in Tallinn, the perky capital, houses more than 150 tech companies..."
WHEN Estonia regained its independence in 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, less than half its population had a telephone line and its...
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Ooooh.
Are they hiring? !?
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AKA browneyedgirl65
Introduction
IF YOU ARE CONFUSED AS TO WHO I AM, THIS IS BROWNEYEDGIRL65, AKA BEG, BEG65, etc, AS KNOWN ON LIVEJOURNAL, DISQUS, TWITTER, PINBOARD.IN, AND MY BLOG, WHATSTHATYOUSAID.NET

I can be reached at gmail via the above handle.

I am also the author of the Palindrome Prayer :-) (-:

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Instant human: Just add coffee.

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The avatar I use, with kind permission, is by Sarah Cloutier, melukilan at deviantart.  You can find the original artwork at her gallery.

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I used to write a good deal about being deaf at my Livejournal blog, particularly under the deafhood tag.
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“Dawn take you all, and be stone to you!”For just at that moment the light came over the hill, and there was a mighty twitter in the branches. William never spoke for he stood turned to stone as he stooped; and Bert and Tom were stuck like rocks as they looked at him. And there they stand to this day, all alone, unless the birds perch on them; for trolls, as you probably know, must be underground before dawn, or they go back to the stuff of the mountains they are made of, and never move again. (“The Hobbit,” J.R.R. Tolkien)

But I'll never be convinced to except except for accept, accept I get a really good explanation. (Me)

Most people don't even know what sysadmins do, but trust me, if they all took a lunch break at the same time they wouldn't make it to the deli before you ran out of bullets protecting your canned goods from roving bands of mutants. (Peter Welch, Programming Sucks)

Life has got a habit of not standing hitched. You got to ride it like you find it. You got to change with it. If a day goes by that don't change some of your old notions for new ones, that is just about like trying to milk a dead cow.  (Woody Guthrie)

California scent with a hint of sanity.
(bot generated email text-fu)

Farpotshket (yiddish): Something that is all fouled up, especially as the result of attempts to fix it; repeatedly making something worse while trying to fix it.

"I know CNN has taken some knocks lately, but the fact is I admire their commitment to cover all sides of a story, just in case one of them happens to be accurate." (Barack Obama, April 2013)

"And on the third day, the skies darkened, and a swarm of assholes descended from the clouds; and not a person could withstand them, but they were covered in the filth of the Internet."  (+Yonatan Zunger , 13 Apr 2013) 

"I never meant to say that the Conservatives are generally stupid. I meant to say that stupid people are generally Conservative. I believe that is so obviously and universally admitted a principle that I hardly think any gentleman will deny it." (John Stuart Mill, 1866)

"Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay." (Robert Frost)

"Few things are stronger than
The mind's need for diverse
Experience.
I am glad
Not many men or women can remain
Faithful lovers to the unreal." (The Gift: Poems by Hafiz the Great Sufi Master)

"wine; talk; touch; unzip; touch; strip; gasp; finger; gasp; mount; fsck; more; yes; gasp; umount; make clean; sleep" (Unix)

They are facing not a theory but a condition, for that they are first, last and all the time the people of the eye. (George Veditz, 1910)

"Most people are prisoners, thinking only about the future or living in the past. They are not in the present, and the present is where everything begins." (Carlos Santana)

"Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes hurtling down the highway."  (Andrew S. Tanenbaum)

"I don’t understand people who dislike reading because I think all that free time means they’re up to no good." (frau sally benz on the 'net)

"Solitude is impractical and yet society is fatal." (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." (Plato)

"It always seemed to me a bit pointless to disapprove of homosexuality. It's like disapproving of rain." (Francis Maude)

"If I Said The Sky Was Blue, They Would Say No." (President Obama)

Honi soit qui mal y pense.

“You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.” (James D. Miles)

The Oxford philosopher JL Austin once observed in a lecture that in English a double negative implied a positive meaning, whereas no language had been found in which a double positive implied a negative meaning. To which Sidney Morgenbesser responded in a dismissive tone, "Yeah, yeah."

"People who dismiss the unemployed and dependent as 'parasites' fail to understand economics and parasitism. A successful parasite is one that is not recognized by its host, one that can make its host work for it without appearing as a burden. Such is the ruling class in a capitalist society." (Jason Read)

"But that's -- I'm sorry, but that's completely ridiculous! How can I possibly prove it doesn't exist? Do you expect me to get hold of -- of all the pebbles in the world and test them? I mean, you could claim that anything's real if the only basis for believing in it is that nobody's proved it doesn't exist!" (Hermione Granger)

To put it another way: The First Amendment guarantees a right to speech. It does not guarantee a right to respect. (+John Scalzi)

So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing. (T. S. Eliot)

A well educated and organized citizenry being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and use the Internet shall not be infringed. (+David Landry)

The truth is that male religious leaders have had -- and still have -- an option to interpret holy teachings either to exalt or subjugate women.  They have, for their own selfish ends, overwhelmingly chosen the latter.  Their continuing choice provides the foundation or justification for much of the pervasive persecution and abuse of women throughout the world.  (Jimmy Carter)

The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men
Gang aft agley
(Robert Burns)

What I like about April Fool’s Day: One day a year we’re asking whether news stories are true. It should be all 365. (Prentiss Riddle, April 1, 2008 @pzriddle)

He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me. (Thomas Jefferson)

Coffee is the best thing to douse the sunrise with.  (Drew Sirtors)

In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer. (Albert Camus)

I am the light that shines over all things. I am everything. From me all came forth, and to me all return. Split a piece of wood, and I am there. Lift a stone, and you will find me there. (Gospel of Thomas)

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.  (Mark Twain)
Bragging rights
I have been on the Internet since the late 80's. I've survived 2400bps modems, Usenet, IRC, Winsocks & Trumpet, Mosaic, all of it. So believe me when I say it's all been done, it's all been done before.
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browneyedgirl65