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In a bold move, the new President of Indonesia, Joko Widodo, has announced plans to merge the ministries of Forestry and Environment.
What does this mean for Indonesia’s environment—and for its forests? Indonesia’s high deforestation and forest degradation rates are causing serious local, national and global environmental problems—raising the stakes for the significance of this merger.
The new President of Indonesia, Joko Widodo, surprised some observers recently when he announced his Cabinet, combining the ministries of Environment and Forestry into one ministry, to be led by Ms. Siti Nurbaya, a politician with ample experience with regional and central governments. The decision sent ripples throughout the Indonesian environmental and policy community—and could signal that a broad and cross-sectoral environmental agenda wou...
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Climate talks in Bonn in June seemed to open the door to formally linking strategies for adaptation with mitigation measures, and a growing body of evidence is showing that linking the two methods is integral to the success of both.

Add a new study in Cameroon to the list. In a paper published earlier this year, researchers in the Central African country showed that efforts to mitigate global warming by curbing deforestation can no longer be conducted separately from measures to help people adapt to a degree of inevitable climate change.
Climate talks in Bonn in June seemed to open the door to formally linking strategies for adaptation with mitigation measures, and a growing body of evidence is showing that linking the two methods is integral to the success of both. Add a new study in Cameroon to the list. In a paper published earlier this year, researchers in the Central African country showed that efforts to mitigate global warming by curbing deforestation can no longer be con...
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A declaration by the governors of 21 tropical states and provinces announced recently at the United Nations Climate Summit is one of the “best deals going” for mitigating climate change and protecting forests, a top scientist says. Find out why non-tropical governments like California and Illinois want to be part of it.
NEW YORK — A declaration by the governors of 21 tropical states and provinces announced recently at the United Nations Climate Summit in New York is one of the “best deals going” for mitigating climate change and protecting forests, a top scientist says. The Governors’ Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF) signed the Rio Branco Declaration in August, committing to reduce deforestation by 80 percent by 2020—if pay-for-performance financing can be se...
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What is the difference between “adaptation” and “mitigation”? What does “REDD+” stand for? In Central Africa, even policymakers dealing with climate change issues don’t always know, a new study finds. Researchers urge more intensive capacity-building workshops across the Congo Basin to help the region’s stakeholders to better understand—and address—climate change.
Policymakers working on forests and climate change in Central Africa often lack knowledge of fundamental concepts of those issues, according to a sobering new study. The research points to a greater need for capacity-building in the countries that are home to the world’s second-largest area of tropical forest. It is all but undisputed fact—few exceptions aside—that tropical forests can be a powerful force in the fight against climate change, a...
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In attempting to find the best method to curb deforestation in Brazil, a new study compares “sticks” and “carrots,” -- or command-and-control strategies and payment for environmental services.  

“We are not advocating one approach over another,” said Jan Börner, the study’s lead author and CIFOR researcher, “Rather, we’re trying to show that what is optimal will depend on what land users and policy makers perceive as a good balance between cost-effectiveness and equity.”
In the ongoing debate about how best to combat deforestation in Brazil, a new study shows that “sticks” are often cheaper than “carrots” — but that relying exclusively on such regulation would inflict a high cost on landowners. “Carrots,” such as payment for environmental services (PES), offer landowners positive incentives such as conditional cash transfers for avoiding deforestation. “Sticks,” or command-and-control strategies, try to prevent ...
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It's a policymaker's dream: Pay local people a nominal stipend to protect and police their forests. But these "payment for environmental services" (PES) programs cannot thrive on cash alone, a new study warns. Getting local people's full support and treating them fairly can be just as important to the success of a PES scheme.
On paper, it is a simple premise: Improve environmental management by financially rewarding the people responsible for conservation. This concept, known as payment for ecosystem services (PES, for short), has won many supporters among policymakers desperate to achieve tangible ecological benefits with tight budgets. PES schemes are now used globally, to incentivize conservation of valuable watersheds, endangered species and threatened forests. ...
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Just as magicians use mirrors to make huge objects seemingly disappear, researchers in Indonesia are developing maps to “find” forests that apparently weren’t there before. The best part: It’s not an illusion.
By developing a more detailed map, researchers have shown that protected forest in Maluku province occupies more than double the area previously believed — a discovery with profound implications for land planners.
But now that local and provincial governments have bought into the new map, the real trick will be to persuade the national government to join them.
These findings are all part of a four-year research and development project known as CoLUPSIA, which stands for Collaborative land-use planning and sustainable institutional arrangement for strengthening land tenure, forest and community rights in Indonesia.
By developing a more detailed map, researchers have shown that protected forest in Maluku province occupies more than double the area previously believed — a discovery with profound implications for land planners. But now that local and provincial governments have bought into the new map, the real trick will be to persuade the national government to join them. These findings are all part of a four-year research and development project known as ...
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A general consensus is arising: integrated landscape approaches have the potential to address multiple and complex environmental, social and political challenges associated with land management. However, such approaches cannot always deliver “win-win” scenarios--there will at times be both winners and losers; one of the challenges is identifying where these trade-offs exist and applying solutions appropriately. In this article, CIFOR experts Liz Deakin and James Reed take an incisive look at the issue.
Integrated approaches to land management at landscape scales have been evident in the development and conservation sectors, under various guises, for many years now. But despite initial promise, strategies such as Integrated Conservation and Development Programs, Ecosystem Based Approaches and Integrated Watershed Management have in many cases failed to deliver on reconciling conservation and development objectives concomitantly. Meanwhile, th...
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As the Ebola crisis wears on, recent articles in New Scientist and The Ecologist are calling for a ban on bushmeat consumption in Africa as a response--despite a mountain of reasons against it.

In response, two experts write that such calls reinforce a wrong-headed “Fortress Conservation” attitude toward Africa, betray an ignorance about the role of bushmeat in Africa’s food security, and exhibit a double standard over how we react to foodborne diseases.
Let them eat cake—is the phrase supposedly uttered by a great princess (though often attributed to Marie Antoinette) upon learning that France’s peasants had no bread. This is a similar response, in our estimation, to what seems to be permeating from certain quarters with respect to the consumption of bushmeat and its links to the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever). A number of opinion pieces have appea...
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Between 1943 and 1990, Vietnam lost 5 million hectares of forest, 28 percent of its total land area. In response, the country is trying to replant forests and protect those that remain through a novel financial scheme. But with ‘considerable’ resources on the line, is the plan working? What lessons have been learned?
Vietnam has witnessed a forest transition on a massive scale. Between 1943 and 1990, the country lost 5 million hectares (ha) of forest, representing fully 28 percent of its total land area. The government responded with reforestation measures—including plantation development, re-categorization of forest, tenure reforms, and enhancing natural forest regeneration—that increased forest cover to almost 40 percent of the land area by 2011. Neverthe...
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China might not spring to mind when one thinks of reforestation--but it should. The country has embarked on an initiative to reclaim farmlands for forests, and like everything in China, it's on a large scale. But is the program having an effect? 

Yes, a new study shows -- but challenges remain, not least of which is the difficulty of measuring the impact of such a massive undertaking, CIFOR Senior Scientist Kiran Asher writes. 
China does not usually come to mind when one thinks about reforestation or afforestation. It should. China’s Conversion of Cropland to Forests Program (CCFP) is the world’s largest Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) afforestation program. In a recent article, Bennett et al. analyze which household-level and local institutional factors are important in determining survival rates of trees planted on CCFP croplands. Two co-authors from CIFOR, ...
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A new article from National Geographic highlights the importance of CGIAR’s agricultural research, and the pressing need for global food systems to sustainably (and substantially) increase yields in order to feed this century’s projected population boom.
Solving the world's looming food crisis will require big investments in agricultural research, yet public support for that is lagging.
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105 people
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226 people
Nonprofit Organizations's profile photo
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Mercados de Medio Ambiente's profile photo
Gabriel Garcia's profile photo
Gideon Suharyanto's profile photo
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Dadan Trisnawardana's profile photo
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Center for International Forestry Research CIFOR Headquarters P.O. Box 0113 BOCBD Bogor 16000 Indonesia
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Forestry research that explores science beyond the tree canopy
Introduction
The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) conducts global scientific research on forest and climate change, adaptation, redd, indigenous groups, deforestation, gender, dry forests, food security, illegal logging, governance, biodiversity.
 
The Center for International Forestry Research is a nonprofit, global facility dedicated to advancing human wellbeing, environmental conservation and equity. We conduct research that enables more informed and equitable decision making about the use and management of forests in less-developed countries.

Our research and expert analysis help policy makers and practitioners shape effective policy, improve the management of tropical forests and address the needs and perspectives of people who depend on forests for their livelihoods.

Our multidisciplinary approach considers the underlying drivers of deforestation and degradation which often lie outside the forestry sector: forces such as agriculture, infrastructure development, trade and investment policies and law enforcement.

CIFOR focuses on the following research areas:
- Enhancing the role of forests in mitigating climate change.
- Enhancing the role of forests in adapting to climate change.
- Improving livelihoods through smallholder and community forestry.
- Managing trade-offs between conservation and development at the landscape scale.
- Managing impacts of globalised trade and investment on forests and forest communities.
- Sustainably managing tropical production forests.