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Christopher J. Volny
Works at General Motors Company
Attends The University of Toledo
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Christopher J. Volny

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Ffffffuuuuuu.... 😲
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Christopher J. Volny

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Did The Past Really Happen?: http://youtu.be/O2jkV4BsN6U
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Parenting Expert Has Nerve To Tell You How To Raise Your Own Goddamn Kids: http://youtu.be/hKmDGWv9gRk
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I love the onion so much. 
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3 Time Travel Paradoxes!!: http://youtu.be/AOwRb584r1c
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that was enjoyable!!!
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The 2nd study described has some really interesting findings.

> At 20 percent of the US population, a substantial group has decided that they can assign scientific findings a value based on other aspects of their belief system.

I would describe these folks as "highly-functional fundamentalists within a science-rich environment." You find them from time to time: electrical engineers that excel at their trade yet think the earth was created in a literal 7 days, etc. It's weird to consider that level of cognitive dissonance in a large population, but 1 in 5 is a lot of people so it's no small phenomenon.
Other data points to science's problems with "post-secularists."
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I'm awefully tempted to compare this to an ecosystem with necessary lower lifeforms. 
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EARTH—In a seemingly unstoppable cycle of carnage that has become tragically commonplace throughout the biosphere, sources confirmed this morning that natural selection has killed an estimated 38 quadrillion organisms in its bloodiest day yet. Numer...
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Lol 
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A proofless introduction to information theory
There are two basic problems in information theory that are very easy to explain. Two people, Alice and Bob, want to communicate over a digital channel over some long period of time, and they know ...
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Heady stuff 
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You have to hear at least the first minute of this rant against anti-vaxxers, courtesy of Canadian commentator Rex Murphy.

Watch here: http://ow.ly/IMnuz
You have to hear at least the first minute of this rant against anti-vaxxers, courtesy of Canadian commentator Rex Murphy. It’s gold, Jerry, Gold!(Thanks to Stephen for the link)
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Found it on YouTube

Rex Murphy: Anti-Vaccine Movement: http://youtu.be/0vCAz5CL6Cc
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It seems like forever ago that I fell in love with the Moblin UI for netbooks.
That died.
Then we had MeeGo that looked and ran the same on that platform.
That died.
Then we had... well, no one was sure.

Here's a nice chart of what's happened since on these software projects.

In the meantime, netbooks are dead. Killed by the Chrome/Ultrabooks.

I'm not optimistic about Tizen as a phone platform.
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/02/samsung-z1-review-the-first-tizen-smartphone-still-feels-like-plan-b/
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Orchid mantis’ astonishing camouflage isn’t especially orchid-like | Ars Technica http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/01/orchid-mantis-astonishing-camouflage-isnt-especially-orchid-like/

> But a tiny insect zipping around on the move, with its compact brain, cannot afford such cognitive extravagance. It has a shortcut—a rule of thumb:anything matching colour X is likely to be a nectar-containing flower. More colour equals bigger flower, with potentially more nectar. No cross-checks, no two-step authentication. The mantis takes advantage of this shortcut by using “sensory exploitation.” It is a concentrated mass of the right colour—a supernormal stimulus. The insect classifies the mantis as a giant nectar-filled flower and approaches to investigate.
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Travelling Faster than the Speed of Light.
There exist natural phenomena in our Universe that will allow you to do just that; so long as it is your local spacetime moving and you're just along for the ride.

Massive rotating black holes exhibit frame-dragging on an unimaginable scale. Frame-dragging is a prediction from General Relativity that rotating massive objects literally drag spacetime around themselves in the direction of rotation and cause nearby orbiting objects to precess; this dragging of spacetime around the Earth, while a small effect, has been confirmed by the Gravity Probe B experiment. The more massive the object and the faster it rotates, the more severe this dragging of the surrounding spacetime becomes. 

Most popular discussion on black holes tends to concern non-rotating black holes, also known as Schwarzchild black holes, which are characterised by a gravitationally dense point or singularity and surrounded or hidden by an event horizon, defined as the surface at which the escape velocity for the black hole reaches the speed of light. Given the movements that characterise stars and galaxies I’m not sure I’m convinced that non-rotating black holes can exist. In any case rotating black holes are known as Kerr black holes and have far more interesting characteristics. 

Rotating black holes collapse not to a point singularity but to a one-dimensional ring singularity, and as they do so they form a number of different event horizons and related surfaces. The first “surface” an external observer would pass through pertains to frame-dragging, is referred to as the edge of the ergosphere and is the point at which spacetime is being dragged around the black hole at the speed of light. Further out from the surface of the ergosphere spacetime is still being dragged around, but at a speed slower than the speed of light. 

Beyond this surface however and deeper towards the rotating black hole, spacetime is being dragged at a rate faster than the speed of light and the deeper you go the faster it gets. Although spacetime itself is being dragged faster than the speed of light, before you hit the first event horizon the escape velocity is still lower than the speed of light and so it is still possible to escape the black hole in this region, and indeed still possible to extract energy in this region that might be used elsewhere. 

A photon striking the edge of the ergosphere at a tangent and in opposite direction to the rotation will come to a stop relative to an external observer; its speed of light propagation will be matched by the opposite speed of light propagation of space itself. Although massive objects still cannot travel faster than light through space, when inside the ergosphere the rotating spacetime will necessarily transport them faster than the speed of light in relation to an external observer. The raw phenomenon to power your warp drive does indeed exist; whether we might ever harness it is another matter. 

Passing through the first event horizon your space-like path becomes time-like, and further inwards you’ll pass another event horizon and your time-like path will again become space-like; but it will have flipped this time and is now reversed with gravity near the ring singularity becoming repulsive. If this wasn’t mind-blowing enough, some paths through these horizons can comprise closed-timelike-curves and the ring singularities might be linked through spacetime to act as wormholes - although these more exotic predictions appear to demand perfectly stable inner regions for rotating black holes and the inner regions appear inherently unstable. 

The wikipedia pages for the main concepts and claims here provide good starting points for digging into more detailed references.


Unanswered Questions.

* Something I’ve always wondered when thinking about rotating massive stars in the process of collapsing to a black hole, and the massive speed-up in rotation rate due conservation of angular momentum as gravity crushes and shrinks the mass . . . is that simple calculations suggest that the rotation rate of the collapsing mass will quickly bump up against the speed of light long before it gets anywhere near infinitely dense singularity status. And as it bumps up near the speed of light it will appear to us to slow down and be frozen in time. Yet the maths suggest infinite density is the end result . . . but that would require speed of light violation? What am I missing? Can someone resolve this for me? 

* Related to above - how can a massive object, presumably not rotating faster than the speed of light, nonetheless cause the surrounding spacetime to be dragged around faster than the speed of light? Can anyone help me out here? 


Other Cool Concepts.

Linear frame-dragging - like rotational frame dragging but for a massive object moving rapidly with a large velocity and dragging spacetime along behind it. 

Gravitomagnetism - or gravitoelectromagnetism; related to frame-dragging. 

Mach’s principle - the idea that local inertial frames are determined by the large-scale distribution of matter; useful for thinking about the precessing that occurs for objects in the ergosphere. 


Item 5 from this short stimulating article served as the inspiration for me to go digging and looking into these topics in more detail: http://listverse.com/2010/11/04/10-strange-things-about-the-universe/ 

#blackhole   #spacetime   #framedragging  
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Woah. (insert picture of Keanu Reeves) 
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Education
  • The University of Toledo
    Computer Science, 2013 - present
  • The University of Toledo
    Computer Science and Engineering, Mathematics, 2005 - 2012
  • Lorain County JVS
    Network Communication Technology, 2003 - 2005
  • North Ridgeville High School
    2001 - 2005
Story
Introduction
I'm studying for a Master's in Computer Science at the University of Toledo.  I currently work for NORIS and have worked in the Engineering Computing Center and as the College Webmaster.

My interests include social networking, computer programming, philosophy, web and graphic design, and teaching. I'm actively involved in the Toledo chapters of ACM, IEEE, and Triangle Fraternity.
Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Skills
Python, Java, .NET, Web Design, Project Management, LISP, R, GNU/Linux
Employment
  • General Motors Company
    Java-EE SAP Software Developer, 2014 - present
  • CJCC / NORIS
    Senior Programming Analyst, 2009 - 2014
    ASP/VB.NET, MS SQL, Telerik Controls, and Powershell Lots of 2.0 web services, System.Management/WMI, and assembly reflection
  • International Financial Group, Inc.
    Microsoft Student Partner, 2013 - 2014
    Microsoft Student Partner (Campus Promoter) for The University of Toledo in Toledo, OH. Windows 8, Azure, and .NET development; Cloud Platform; and Xbox technology promotion.
  • The University of Toledo
    UNIX Developer, 2008 - 2012
  • The University of Toledo
    College of Engineering Webmaster, 2011 - 2013
  • University of Toledo
    Peer Mentor, 2009 - 2013
    Lab instructor and peer mentor for EECS 1010 (Intro to EECS), 1530 (Intro to Computer Programming), and 1560 (Intro to OOP).
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
August 19
Great happy hour specials on appetizers.
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