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Christopher Dreyer
Works at Colorado School of Mines
Attended Drexel University
Lives in Lakewood, Colorado
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Christopher Dreyer

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My son has a project in his 4th grade class where students are research topics that interest them. He is researching future technology. He heard about +Elon Musk and is determined to ask him a few questions. The link goes to Liam's letter to Elon. I'm posting this here hoping that Elon will see it. If you reply it will make a 9 year old's year.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DJanx8rM0Fgi6x3s6dWKXEWEvmiO7b9ZVK_Qd2c4ZCA/pub
Dear Elon Musk,. So I have heard about you Elon Musk. At my school we're doing this thing called genius hour. I'm doing how the world will change in the future. When I was researching I come across you. So I was wondering if you could answer some questions? What transportation will be used in ...
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Such a touching letter. And I can answer the first question. Teleportation. The second question also. Tiny houses. I hope he is good at math. Seems to be. Good luck to you in life. Make every minute count.
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My son's 4th grade project is "What will change in the future." His research is  to include talking to people who know the subject. I told him about the Hyperloop. Now he wants to talk to +Elon Musk.

He was writing his research plans this morning before school and asked his mom, "Who's that guy with the train in a tube idea?".
"Elon Musk," she said.
"Ok, I'll call him.".
"You can't call him," she said, "Lots of people want to talk to him."
"I can try," he said.

Elon, what do you say?
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Christopher Dreyer

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That's her LEM landing code threatening to fall over on her. 
This is a great photo I just ran across on the internets. It said it was “Margaret Hamilton, Apollo program”, but it did…
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A group from Hawaii will be hosting an exhibition of space mining robots in a few weeks. They plan for this to become an international competition of university student designed and built robotic space miners. They have a RocketHub campaign where you can donate to help make it happen. It's what I plan to do.
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Additive manufacturing course offered at the +Colorado School of Mines in August. 
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Photo Shoot

Starting Monday, Prove Your World will begin a new video series on a range of topics, starting with gravity.

In the mean time, check out some publicity shots taken by +Kevin Schoonover!
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I'm at the 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Competition with a group I advise from the +Colorado School of Mines. Follow us on twitter @Blasterbotica.
 
We are hosting the 2014 NASA Robotics Mining Competition this week. Practices take place today and tomorrow with the official competition kicking off Wednesday. Guests may view the teams in action through Friday. Learn more http://bit.ly/1gZJtCk

Photo credit: NASA
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Christopher Dreyer

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My son has a project in his 4th grade class where students are research topics that interest them. He is researching future technology. He heard about +Elon Musk and is determined to ask him a few questions. The link goes to Liam's letter to Elon. I'm posting this here hoping that Elon will see it. If you reply it will make a 9 year old's year.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DJanx8rM0Fgi6x3s6dWKXEWEvmiO7b9ZVK_Qd2c4ZCA/pub
Dear Elon Musk,. So I have heard about you Elon Musk. At my school we're doing this thing called genius hour. I'm doing how the world will change in the future. When I was researching I come across you. So I was wondering if you could answer some questions? What transportation will be used in ...
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I've been listening to This Week in Science for years. It was one of the first podcasts l listened to. Back then it was taped at UC Davis and broadcast on UCD radio. I really need to support them financially and you should too. 
 
Good morning plussers!!!

To start off my Saturday, besides coffee, I want to spread the love I've been receiving in SPADES as of late.

So, I'd like to point you towards +This Week in Science (TWIS), who does a phenomenal job bringing science to the masses and has been doing so for YEARS through various means. You can watch +Kiki Sanford, +Blair Bazdarich and +justin jackson record their shows live on Google+ each week, PLUS download the produced podcast from iTunes!

I urge you to consider becoming a patron of TWIS because they're awesome people who create an awesome show and are extremely impassioned about delivering science news and commentary every week to a wide audience!

Oh and go circle their page, while you're at it. I linked it above. 

Have a great weekend!
https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinscience
Patreon is empowering a new generation of creators. Support and engage with artists and creators as they live out their passions!
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Great post. And the lead author on the paper is from my university, +Colorado School of Mines.
 
Somewhere Across the Sea

When we look at the Moon, we see a surface pocked with craters, scattered between seas of basalt from ancient lava flows. Since the Moon is not geologically active, it’s easy to imagine that the formation of lunar seas was triggered by large impacts. That’s actually been the dominant theory for some time. Now new research indicates that for at least one of the great seas, Oceanus Procellarum, that isn’t the case.

The results have been recently published in Nature, and shows that the great sea seems to be the result of geological activity. The team looked at data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), which is a pair of satellites that mapped the gravity of the Moon in great detail. When they analyzed the data, the team found rift zones bordering Oceanus Procellarum. These rift zones (seen on the right of the image below) are fairly straight with sharp angles, which is not the type of thing you see with impact zones.

We have observed rift zones on several planets, as well as on Saturn’s moon Enceladus, but finding them on the Moon is rather surprising. The Moon is not massive enough to drive plate tectonic activity on its own, and it isn’t driven by strong tidal effects like some moons of Jupiter and Saturn. So it isn’t clear how such rift zones could have formed on the lunar surface. One idea proposed by the authors is that the Moon’s crust is rather thin, and the under layers of that region were heated by radioactive decay. The Procellarum region is known to have higher concentrations of radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium, and this could have driven rift formation in the past.

Regardless of the cause, it seems clear that the Moon was not simply a Moon battered by ancient impacts. It also had a few geological tricks of its own, and the famous Man in the Moon feature of Oceanus Procellarum is the result of one of them.

Image: NASA/Colorado School of Mines/MIT/JPL/Goddard Space Flight Center

Paper: Andrews-Hanna, J. C. et al. Structure and evolution of the lunar Procellarum region as revealed by GRAIL gravity data. Nature 514, 68–71 (2014)
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The ISEE-3 spacecraft is being revived by a group of private of space entrepreneurs. Here is the trajectory.
 
I created an animation of the original ISEE-3 trajectory from back in 1978-1985.  ISEE-3 was originally launched to an Earth-Sun L1 orbit in 1978. The escape trajectory, Lunar swingbys and all the fun cis-lunar stuff was done by Bob Farquhar, David Dunham, Craig Roberts and others working at GSFC back in the early 1980s. Really excellent work.  It's fun to see how it left, and then compare that to how it's coming back.  Note that it leaves to the top, which is the direction of the Earth's velocity around the sun.  This will be important later, because the spacecraft subsequently drifted gradually in front of the Earth in heliocentric space and eventually went 360 degrees and caught up the the Earth from the other direction (which we'll see in the final animation).

 I'll put together another animation later showing the comet flybys that occurred after this, and then the 1987-2014 trajectory and post those.
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The Space Shuttle Atlantis display at +Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is excellent. I visited it yesterday. Here are a few pictures.
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Collections Christopher is following
Education
  • Drexel University
    Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering
  • University of Colorado at Boulder
    Mechanical Engineering
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Chris
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • HOT WHEELS® SHOWDOWN™
  • Bloons Monkey City
  • Stickman Soccer 2014
  • Smashy Road:Wanted
  • Crash Drive 2
  • Truck Simulator : Offroad
  • Google Play Android Developer
  • Real Driving 3D
  • Bloons TD Battles
  • Earn to Die 2
  • Clash of Clans
  • Scribblenauts Remix
  • Dude Perfect 2
  • Extreme Car Driving Simulator
  • Terraria
  • Stickman Basketball
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Introduction
Engineer interested in space exploration, science, energy production, lasers, physics, science fiction and other cool stuff.
Work
Occupation
Engineer/Researcher
Employment
  • Colorado School of Mines
    Assistant Research Professor, present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Lakewood, Colorado
Previously
Cherry Hill, New Jersey - Boulder, Colorado - Philadelphia, PA - Cleveland, Ohio - Tabernacle, NJ
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It is amazing what they can do with sushi : )
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a great little museum. The subject is interesting to just about anyone. The cost is low and well worth the expense.
Appeal: ExcellentFacilities: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
2 reviews
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