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Chris Risner
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One of the most important things you learn in any job is what's actually safe and what isn't. This is true if you're fueling trucks, raising a kid, or designing spacecraft: you develop a profound intuition for which corners are completely fine to cut and which things you never even slightly mess around with. Most often, as you learn a trade, you more and more realize that things you thought were dangerous are actually safe -- which makes sense, since it's better for those who don't know to assume danger. You end up dividing things into three groups: things that really are dangerous, things that are dangerous unless you know what you're doing, and things which aren't dangerous at all.

Of course, what you really don't want is for a bunch of amateurs to then tell you how to do your job. There's the old joke about how first-time parents, when their baby drops a pacifier, will resterilize it in boiling water; second-time parents will give it a quick rinse; third-time parents will shrug, wipe it off on their shirt, and stick it back in the kid. You really wouldn't want a bunch of first-time parents (or non-parents) passing a law mandating that you sterilize everything. What you want is for less-experienced people to learn from more-experienced people.

In this context, here's an interesting new Pew survey of attitudes towards science. What I found most interesting about it is that a lot of the questions on which there were big differences between scientists' opinions and those of the general public were precisely "is this safe" questions tied to the things that scientists deal with every day. 

Most of the time, people who know the subject say that something which sounds dangerous is actually perfectly safe: eating genetically modified foods, eating foods grown with pesticides, getting vaccines, building nuclear power plants (!). Perhaps more interestingly, there are some things which the general public thinks is safe which experts say OH HELL NO GET AWAY FROM THAT SWITCH YOU LUNATIC to: allowing climate change and increasing offshore drilling being the two most notable examples. That's part of the same kind of professional eyeball: sometimes you know that something is just a giant deathtrap waiting to happen. Turns out that offshore drilling rigs are far, far more alarming to professionals than nuclear power plants: the former fail all the time, in horribly disastrous ways, while the latter are actually pretty reliable, all told.

We can talk about lots of reasons for this: for example, the media loves to make things sound really scary (because that sells newspapers), or people don't know enough about the details. But really, what's going on is simply the judgment of experience: people who work with various strange and foreign things, day-in and day-out, tend to get a pretty good feeling for what does and doesn't matter. And it's not always going to be obvious which is which: you just have to ask people who know.
The public and scientists express strikingly different views about science-related issues, yet both groups agree that K-12 STEM education in America falls behind other nations.
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Atleast we agree on the space station! 
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Check out how clean this rig is.

Phoenix was a 2014 launch.
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ahem
A Shadowrun cyberpunk cRPG set in 2056's Magically Awakened Hong Kong by the developers of Shadowrun Returns & Dragonfall.
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It's probably good to be a bit paranoid when using any wifi that you don't completely trust. 
SSL certificates exist to increase security and prevent snooping on your browsing sessions. Gogo believes you shouldn't have that and appears to be intentionally performing MITM attacks on its users.
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Twitter is down. Where do I post my unimportant complaints now?
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Dates are hard
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So long eclipse
 
#pixelpushing #eclipsepushing  

"Caution: The ADT plugin for Eclipse is no longer in active development. If you're currently using it, you should migrate to Android Studio as soon as possible" and Eclipse and I were both all like...
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So just checking but is anyone on Lollipop NOT experiencing these issues: https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=79729

I'm ready to throw my Moto X off a bridge :(
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Monument Valley revenue breakdown

iOS vs Android is really interesting. Android users, at last count, outnumbered iOS 4:1. But Monument Valley's iOS revenue outnumbers Android by almost 6:1.

An iOS user is 24 times more likely to purchase Monument Valley. And Monument Valley is an absolutely stunning game on Android.
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But don't forget that Monument Valley was originally listed on Android/Amazon for free. 
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I knew there was something screwy on my phone
 
Motorola Lollipop updates

First of all: peace! :-)  There is so much anger floating around this topic, I just want to reassure we're working really hard on it, and, as promised, our Moto products from 2014 and 2013 will be updated to Lollipop really soon.

At this point, you may have already heard that some people are receiving 5.0.2 based OTA pushes. That's a limited soak test roll out for some of our products in different regions of the world. The update will be pushed to a wider audience if no critical showstoppers are found by users who already received it.

Users on the 1st generation Moto products need to make sure they have the latest Motorola Updates Services from the Play Store. If you don't see it showing in your list of apps available for update (or it shows as not compatible) don't worry, it'll be available for you to download it really soon.

Updates of this nature take time. It's no secret that when 5.0 launched it still had bugs. And, when we update our products, we end up finding more bugs that need to be fixed. There are a lot of reasons for what that happen, but, basically, each phone has a unique set of components and a way they interact. When Google creates a new release, they don't validate it for all the possible combinations there are, and they won't fix anything that's not reproducible on a Nexus device, that's our job.

I hope you can appreciate the time we spend rounding up the performance and making sure you can continue to enjoy the awesome smooth experience of the amazing Moto products you've come to know and love.

Thank you all for the loyalty and support!
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I have a couple of co-workers who will be really happy to hear this.  Thanks for the info.
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Thought this was worth sharing:
Mastering the art of tying several different kinds of knots is essential for a sailor’s security. Learn how to tie three essential sailing knots in this Sailing Pro Shop infographic.
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When we publicly launched Freebase back in 2007, we thought of it as a "Wikipedia for structured data." So it shouldn't be surprising that we've been closely watching the Wikimedia Foundation's project Wikidata[1] since it launched about two years ago. We believe strongly in a robust community-driven effort to collect and curate structured knowledge about the world, but we now think we can serve that goal best by supporting Wikidata -- they’re growing fast, have an active community, and are better-suited to lead an open collaborative knowledge base.

So we've decided to help transfer the data in Freebase to Wikidata, and in mid-2015 we’ll wind down the Freebase service as a standalone project. Freebase has also supported developer access to the data, so before we retire it, we’ll launch a new API for entity search powered by Google's Knowledge Graph.

Loading Freebase into Wikidata as-is wouldn't meet the Wikidata community's guidelines for citation and sourcing of facts -- while a significant portion of the facts in Freebase came from Wikipedia itself, those facts were attributed to Wikipedia and not the actual original non-Wikipedia sources. So we’ll be launching a tool for Wikidata community members to match Freebase assertions to potential citations from either Google Search or our Knowledge Vault[2], so these individual facts can then be properly loaded to Wikidata. 

We believe this is the best first step we can take toward becoming a constructive participant in the Wikidata community, but we’ll look to continually evolve our role to support the goal of a comprehensive open database of common knowledge that anyone can use.

Here are the important dates to know:

Before the end of March 2015
- We’ll launch a Wikidata import review tool
- We’ll announce a transition plan for the Freebase Search API & Suggest Widget to a Knowledge Graph-based solution

March 31, 2015
- Freebase as a service will become read-only
- The website will no longer accept edits 
- We’ll retire the MQL write API

June 30, 2015
- We’ll retire the Freebase website and APIs[3]
- The last Freebase data dump will remain available, but developers should check out the Wikidata dump[4]

The Knowledge Graph team at Google

[1] http://wikidata.org
[2] http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~nlao/publication/2014.kdd.pdf
[3] https://developers.google.com/freebase/v1/
[4] http://dumps.wikimedia.org/wikidatawiki/
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I'm a mobile app engineer, sailor, bourbon lover, and craft brew drinker.  My current focus is Android and Java based technologies but I still find time to get into iPhone and .Net development.
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I started going to Tim's when I moved into the area last year. The quality of seafood he gets in is just amazing and it's always a delight to eat. If you're in to poke, stop by Tim's and get some! It's fantastic. Much higher quality than some of the other bigger fish markets on the Eastside..
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