Profile

Cover photo
Chris Risner
Works at Microsoft
889 followers|851,101 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTubeReviews

Stream

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
I love the comment from one of the people that made the Application singleton saying she wished they hadn't.
 
+Reto Meier In your book, regarding the Application object, you suggest to maintain our global state data within a custom singleton class instead of the Application object.
Is there any "not written rule" about the cases where this is a "bad" design?
For example, maintaining a bitmap memory cache (lrucache for example to have some bitmaps shared between different fragments /activities): wouldn't it be dangerous to hold it as just a normal singleton (static reference to an array of bitmaps) instead of holding them inside the application object with non static references?
This could get resumed like "is android properly removing/gc'ing singletons? Are they bound to the Application lifecycle or are they reclaimed more often? "
27 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
So just checking but is anyone on Lollipop NOT experiencing these issues: https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=79729

I'm ready to throw my Moto X off a bridge :(
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Monument Valley revenue breakdown

iOS vs Android is really interesting. Android users, at last count, outnumbered iOS 4:1. But Monument Valley's iOS revenue outnumbers Android by almost 6:1.

An iOS user is 24 times more likely to purchase Monument Valley. And Monument Valley is an absolutely stunning game on Android.
144 comments on original post
1
1
Dianna M's profile photo
 
But don't forget that Monument Valley was originally listed on Android/Amazon for free. 
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
I knew there was something screwy on my phone
 
Motorola Lollipop updates

First of all: peace! :-)  There is so much anger floating around this topic, I just want to reassure we're working really hard on it, and, as promised, our Moto products from 2014 and 2013 will be updated to Lollipop really soon.

At this point, you may have already heard that some people are receiving 5.0.2 based OTA pushes. That's a limited soak test roll out for some of our products in different regions of the world. The update will be pushed to a wider audience if no critical showstoppers are found by users who already received it.

Users on the 1st generation Moto products need to make sure they have the latest Motorola Updates Services from the Play Store. If you don't see it showing in your list of apps available for update (or it shows as not compatible) don't worry, it'll be available for you to download it really soon.

Updates of this nature take time. It's no secret that when 5.0 launched it still had bugs. And, when we update our products, we end up finding more bugs that need to be fixed. There are a lot of reasons for what that happen, but, basically, each phone has a unique set of components and a way they interact. When Google creates a new release, they don't validate it for all the possible combinations there are, and they won't fix anything that's not reproducible on a Nexus device, that's our job.

I hope you can appreciate the time we spend rounding up the performance and making sure you can continue to enjoy the awesome smooth experience of the amazing Moto products you've come to know and love.

Thank you all for the loyalty and support!
1
Tim Joseph's profile photo
 
I have a couple of co-workers who will be really happy to hear this.  Thanks for the info.
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
It's probably good to be a bit paranoid when using any wifi that you don't completely trust. 
SSL certificates exist to increase security and prevent snooping on your browsing sessions. Gogo believes you shouldn't have that and appears to be intentionally performing MITM attacks on its users.
3 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
I hope my invite to #io15 didn't get lost in the internet tubes!
1
Elaine Tate's profile photo
 
Hi
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
One of the most important things you learn in any job is what's actually safe and what isn't. This is true if you're fueling trucks, raising a kid, or designing spacecraft: you develop a profound intuition for which corners are completely fine to cut and which things you never even slightly mess around with. Most often, as you learn a trade, you more and more realize that things you thought were dangerous are actually safe -- which makes sense, since it's better for those who don't know to assume danger. You end up dividing things into three groups: things that really are dangerous, things that are dangerous unless you know what you're doing, and things which aren't dangerous at all.

Of course, what you really don't want is for a bunch of amateurs to then tell you how to do your job. There's the old joke about how first-time parents, when their baby drops a pacifier, will resterilize it in boiling water; second-time parents will give it a quick rinse; third-time parents will shrug, wipe it off on their shirt, and stick it back in the kid. You really wouldn't want a bunch of first-time parents (or non-parents) passing a law mandating that you sterilize everything. What you want is for less-experienced people to learn from more-experienced people.

In this context, here's an interesting new Pew survey of attitudes towards science. What I found most interesting about it is that a lot of the questions on which there were big differences between scientists' opinions and those of the general public were precisely "is this safe" questions tied to the things that scientists deal with every day. 

Most of the time, people who know the subject say that something which sounds dangerous is actually perfectly safe: eating genetically modified foods, eating foods grown with pesticides, getting vaccines, building nuclear power plants (!). Perhaps more interestingly, there are some things which the general public thinks is safe which experts say OH HELL NO GET AWAY FROM THAT SWITCH YOU LUNATIC to: allowing climate change and increasing offshore drilling being the two most notable examples. That's part of the same kind of professional eyeball: sometimes you know that something is just a giant deathtrap waiting to happen. Turns out that offshore drilling rigs are far, far more alarming to professionals than nuclear power plants: the former fail all the time, in horribly disastrous ways, while the latter are actually pretty reliable, all told.

We can talk about lots of reasons for this: for example, the media loves to make things sound really scary (because that sells newspapers), or people don't know enough about the details. But really, what's going on is simply the judgment of experience: people who work with various strange and foreign things, day-in and day-out, tend to get a pretty good feeling for what does and doesn't matter. And it's not always going to be obvious which is which: you just have to ask people who know.
The public and scientists express strikingly different views about science-related issues, yet both groups agree that K-12 STEM education in America falls behind other nations.
96 comments on original post
1
Steven Kelley (Senator Kelley)'s profile photo
 
Atleast we agree on the space station! 
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Check out how clean this rig is.

Phoenix was a 2014 launch.
15 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
ahem
A Shadowrun cyberpunk cRPG set in 2056's Magically Awakened Hong Kong by the developers of Shadowrun Returns & Dragonfall.
15 comments on original post
2
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Thought this was worth sharing:
Mastering the art of tying several different kinds of knots is essential for a sailor’s security. Learn how to tie three essential sailing knots in this Sailing Pro Shop infographic.
4 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Chris Risner

Shared publicly  - 
 
Twitter is down. Where do I post my unimportant complaints now?
7
The Tinfoil Tricorn's profile photoYuriy Galanter's profile photoDanny Hermes's profile photoChris Risner's profile photo
4 comments
 
Dates are hard
Add a comment...
Story
Introduction
I'm a mobile app engineer, sailor, bourbon lover, and craft brew drinker.  My current focus is Android and Java based technologies but I still find time to get into iPhone and .Net development.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Mobile Software Engineer
Employment
  • Microsoft
    Technical Evangelist, present
Links
Other profiles
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
Excellent red wines. Very friendly staff. Excellent value with the wine club.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
36 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Well supplied store with many North American built bicycles and not just the Asian giants. Very informed and friendly staff. I purchased a bike there last year which entitled me to free basic tune ups and refitting through the end of this year. Plus a discount on all accessories through the year.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago