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Chris Kennedy
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Chris Kennedy

Amateur Astrophotography  - 
 
Once in a "Blue Moon"...

Actually managed to get clear skies, a night off, the following day of to recover and almost no breeze!

The Veil Nebula and 52 Cygni

From Wikipedia:

The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded some 5,000 to 8,000 years ago, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) data supports a distance of about 1,470 light-years.

52 Cygni is a triple star system in the northern constellation of Cygnus with a combined apparent magnitude of 4.22. The brighter component is a probable spectroscopic binary that may consist of two similar stars; these are evolved giant stars with a combined stellar classification of G9.5III.

Session:

Lets be honest, British summers are a myth, something we like to think we have, but really don't. In this country it's an extended spring with occasional warm days, when BBQs are frantically dusted off. So for it to be a clear night, with occasional thin hazy high cloud, barely any breeze and my evening off, was truly a "Once in a Blue Moon" experience.

Whilst a bad pun, it was indeed this years "Blue Moon", with it being 99.6% illuminated and Facebook littered with blue tinted images, with people expecting it to actually be blue in colour...

So despite this source of illumination washing out the sky, I decided to experiment; could narrowband filters cut out enough of the glare to get "something". My target was the Western Veil nebula, something I'd never seen before, outside of Wikipedia. It's easy to find, if you know the constellation of Cygnus, you look for a bright star tucked below it's body and near it's wing, visible to the naked eye, it's a no-brainer to find.

After finding it and getting my guiding set up, I tested a quick 120s sub frame, saw details popping in to view and set up for 12 minute subs, the longest I'd ever attempted, after boiling a kettle, making a coffee and pacing around the garden looking up, the exposure came in, and I knew, that despite that Moon, I might just have something, it was tantalising and always exciting to see something new.

After two hours of capturing Ha data, I switched over to OIII and started a run of 10 x 12 minutes, another two hours would have to pass before I had two even data sets, but more and more thin cloud would wander in to my field of view, that and the Moon that had barely bothered the Ha data was taking the contrast right out of the OIII data, I presume due to more blue light being scattered about.

The session completed and the Sun started to rise, so I packed up and started processing, I noticed that in the four hour period the image had gradually shifted right and rotated by a few degrees, my polar alignment needs work, but I can honestly say, I'm one sleepy but extremely happy amateur astrophotographer.

Technical Data:

Telescope: Meade LX90 8" SCT
Additional Optics: Meade f/6.3 focal reducer/field flattener (over corrects this rig)
Camera: ATIK414ex Mono with ATIK EFW2
Filters: Baader Narrowband Ha (7nm), OIII
Guiding: Orion ST-80 with Starshoot Autoguider (PHD2 Guiding Software)
Processing: Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop.

Subs: All binned 1x1, 720s exposures (12 minutes), Total imaging time, 4 hours.
Ha: 10
OIII: 10
No flats, No Bias, No Dark.

About the Image:
The image is a square crop of both Ha and OIII data stacked to produce a loosely "true colour" image of an extremely tiny portion of this massive nebula, indeed it would take many nights of imaging just to get the entire Western Veil imaged, yet alone the greater Cygnus loop. This image was made over a cup off coffee straight after the imaging session, so whilst it's a first attempt at working with the data, I feel it's a good enough start to show.

Some sharpening was applied to the image, just to emphasis the structure, but beyond the normal histogram stretching and curves, little more was done to the image.
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[ Blank ]'s profile photoJoniceia Paranhos's profile photo
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Chris Kennedy

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Once in a "Blue Moon"...

Actually managed to get clear skies, a night off, the following day of to recover and almost no breeze!

The Veil Nebula and 52 Cygni

From Wikipedia:

The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded some 5,000 to 8,000 years ago, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) data supports a distance of about 1,470 light-years.

52 Cygni is a triple star system in the northern constellation of Cygnus with a combined apparent magnitude of 4.22. The brighter component is a probable spectroscopic binary that may consist of two similar stars; these are evolved giant stars with a combined stellar classification of G9.5III.

Session:

Lets be honest, British summers are a myth, something we like to think we have, but really don't. In this country it's an extended spring with occasional warm days, when BBQs are frantically dusted off. So for it to be a clear night, with occasional thin hazy high cloud, barely any breeze and my evening off, was truly a "Once in a Blue Moon" experience.

Whilst a bad pun, it was indeed this years "Blue Moon", with it being 99.6% illuminated and Facebook littered with blue tinted images, with people expecting it to actually be blue in colour...

So despite this source of illumination washing out the sky, I decided to experiment; could narrowband filters cut out enough of the glare to get "something". My target was the Western Veil nebula, something I'd never seen before, outside of Wikipedia. It's easy to find, if you know the constellation of Cygnus, you look for a bright star tucked below it's body and near it's wing, visible to the naked eye, it's a no-brainer to find.

After finding it and getting my guiding set up, I tested a quick 120s sub frame, saw details popping in to view and set up for 12 minute subs, the longest I'd ever attempted, after boiling a kettle, making a coffee and pacing around the garden looking up, the exposure came in, and I knew, that despite that Moon, I might just have something, it was tantalising and always exciting to see something new.

After two hours of capturing Ha data, I switched over to OIII and started a run of 10 x 12 minutes, another two hours would have to pass before I had two even data sets, but more and more thin cloud would wander in to my field of view, that and the Moon that had barely bothered the Ha data was taking the contrast right out of the OIII data, I presume due to more blue light being scattered about.

The session completed and the Sun started to rise, so I packed up and started processing, I noticed that in the four hour period the image had gradually shifted right and rotated by a few degrees, my polar alignment needs work, but I can honestly say, I'm one sleepy but extremely happy amateur astrophotographer.

Technical Data:

Telescope: Meade LX90 8" SCT
Additional Optics: Meade f/6.3 focal reducer/field flattener (over corrects this rig)
Camera: ATIK414ex Mono with ATIK EFW2
Filters: Baader Narrowband Ha (7nm), OIII
Guiding: Orion ST-80 with Starshoot Autoguider (PHD2 Guiding Software)
Processing: Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop.

Subs: All binned 1x1, 720s exposures (12 minutes), Total imaging time, 4 hours.
Ha: 10
OIII: 10
No flats, No Bias, No Dark.

About the Image:
The image is a square crop of both Ha and OIII data stacked to produce a loosely "true colour" image of an extremely tiny portion of this massive nebula, indeed it would take many nights of imaging just to get the entire Western Veil imaged, yet alone the greater Cygnus loop. This image was made over a cup off coffee straight after the imaging session, so whilst it's a first attempt at working with the data, I feel it's a good enough start to show.

Some sharpening was applied to the image, just to emphasis the structure, but beyond the normal histogram stretching and curves, little more was done to the image.
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myriam hamza-fourneret's profile photoJose Vargas's profile photo
 
Merci pour tout ! Pour votre connaissance, pour le fait d'expliquer tout en détail, de vulgariser pour nous permettre de connaître et de comprendre ! 👏👏👏👏👏👏
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Chris Kennedy

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Almost completed 4 hours of data gathering from a small section of the Veil Nebula #excitednerd #onceinabluemoon  
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Dylan O'Donnell's profile photoAngel Butafly's profile photoPaul Stewart's profile photo
3 comments
 
I feel a mosaic coming soon ;)
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Clear tonight, but there's a big fat moon - still going to try Ha imaging!
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Helen Read's profile photo
 
Good opportunity to image the Big Fat Moon while you are at it!
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Sometimes the astronomer in me, gets along just fine with clouds. Taken with my Nikon D300 and a 300mm lens.
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Grant Mackintosh's profile photoJames Haney's profile photo
2 comments
 
Nice atmosphere...
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The happy moment when you realise your ASI120mm screws on to your ATIK filter wheel with no adapters...just add filters and I am ready for LRGB planetary:)
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Gizmo the Sane's profile photoChris Kennedy's profile photoKevin Franklin's profile photo
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You might run into some issues if the Barlow is too far from the imager. 
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The +Global Star Party will be starting soon, check it out for live views of space (and clouds): https://youtu.be/0ftEJfuVavQ #gsp #space #science #outreach
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Have him in circles
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Chris Kennedy

Deep sky imaging  - 
 
Once in a "Blue Moon"...

Actually managed to get clear skies, a night off, the following day of to recover and almost no breeze!

The Veil Nebula and 52 Cygni

From Wikipedia:

The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded some 5,000 to 8,000 years ago, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) data supports a distance of about 1,470 light-years.

52 Cygni is a triple star system in the northern constellation of Cygnus with a combined apparent magnitude of 4.22. The brighter component is a probable spectroscopic binary that may consist of two similar stars; these are evolved giant stars with a combined stellar classification of G9.5III.

Session:

Lets be honest, British summers are a myth, something we like to think we have, but really don't. In this country it's an extended spring with occasional warm days, when BBQs are frantically dusted off. So for it to be a clear night, with occasional thin hazy high cloud, barely any breeze and my evening off, was truly a "Once in a Blue Moon" experience.

Whilst a bad pun, it was indeed this years "Blue Moon", with it being 99.6% illuminated and Facebook littered with blue tinted images, with people expecting it to actually be blue in colour...

So despite this source of illumination washing out the sky, I decided to experiment; could narrowband filters cut out enough of the glare to get "something". My target was the Western Veil nebula, something I'd never seen before, outside of Wikipedia. It's easy to find, if you know the constellation of Cygnus, you look for a bright star tucked below it's body and near it's wing, visible to the naked eye, it's a no-brainer to find.

After finding it and getting my guiding set up, I tested a quick 120s sub frame, saw details popping in to view and set up for 12 minute subs, the longest I'd ever attempted, after boiling a kettle, making a coffee and pacing around the garden looking up, the exposure came in, and I knew, that despite that Moon, I might just have something, it was tantalising and always exciting to see something new.

After two hours of capturing Ha data, I switched over to OIII and started a run of 10 x 12 minutes, another two hours would have to pass before I had two even data sets, but more and more thin cloud would wander in to my field of view, that and the Moon that had barely bothered the Ha data was taking the contrast right out of the OIII data, I presume due to more blue light being scattered about.

The session completed and the Sun started to rise, so I packed up and started processing, I noticed that in the four hour period the image had gradually shifted right and rotated by a few degrees, my polar alignment needs work, but I can honestly say, I'm one sleepy but extremely happy amateur astrophotographer.

Technical Data:

Telescope: Meade LX90 8" SCT
Additional Optics: Meade f/6.3 focal reducer/field flattener (over corrects this rig)
Camera: ATIK414ex Mono with ATIK EFW2
Filters: Baader Narrowband Ha (7nm), OIII
Guiding: Orion ST-80 with Starshoot Autoguider (PHD2 Guiding Software)
Processing: Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop.

Subs: All binned 1x1, 720s exposures (12 minutes), Total imaging time, 4 hours.
Ha: 10
OIII: 10
No flats, No Bias, No Dark.

About the Image:
The image is a square crop of both Ha and OIII data stacked to produce a loosely "true colour" image of an extremely tiny portion of this massive nebula, indeed it would take many nights of imaging just to get the entire Western Veil imaged, yet alone the greater Cygnus loop. This image was made over a cup off coffee straight after the imaging session, so whilst it's a first attempt at working with the data, I feel it's a good enough start to show.

Some sharpening was applied to the image, just to emphasis the structure, but beyond the normal histogram stretching and curves, little more was done to the image.
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Schroeder Enriquez's profile photoThomas Langnickel-Stiegler (ラングニッケル・トーマス)'s profile photoUniverseSpace BioC's profile photo
 
This is a breathe of fresh air from all those blue moon posts today.
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Just going to pop this here :D
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Kevin Franklin's profile photoDylan O'Donnell's profile photoAngel Butafly's profile photoKari Roberts's profile photo
8 comments
 
+Chris Kennedy​!!!! Omg congrats!!! :D 
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This is what a dude likes to see!!!!!
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Bryan Holland's profile photoKevin Franklin's profile photoChristopher Madson's profile photo
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Haha :) That is impressive! That'll teach me not to read the article first!
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Every week, myself and fellow amateur astronomers stream live views of planets, nebulae, and other wonders of space - would be a honor if you'd check it out, watch the show live, or if you've got the gear and know how - join us in show to stream views from your telescope.

We also discuss current space related events, gear, techniques and utterly crazy random stuff to!

We've got a great bunch of astronomers from around the world, but could really do with more from the American side of the planet.
 
Live views of objects in space, from planets to nebulae! With astro images, Q&A and lively debate, come join use for our weekly hangout!

Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/8Y6y0Cz7_1Q

Places to find us:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalstarparty
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+GlobalStarParty

Submit Images for the Show:
https://www.flickr.com/groups/globalstarparty/
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Global Star Party. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
Global Star Party - Western Nighttime Edition
Tomorrow, August 1, 10:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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Angel Butafly's profile photoPoll Smith's profile photoIva Galić's profile photoUniverseSpace BioC's profile photo
 
fingers crossed I stay awake lol
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Have him in circles
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Eugenia Rish's profile photo
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Siddharth Mukherji's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
British freelance photographer, amateur astronomer, traveller and barman!
Introduction
I am passionate about astronomy and travel, love to photograph the universe around me, from people close to home, right up to galaxies far, far away.

Life is to be explored, enjoyed and horizons broadened, which means I am probably going to need a bigger telescope some day.
Bragging rights
Travelled the World, Photographed Galaxies
Work
Occupation
Photographer and Bar Tender
Skills
Photography, Design
Fantastic place, friendly, rather homely and really yummy BBQ nights. Clean facilities, not to far out of the center of Cairns and really didn't want to leave by the end of my time there.
Quality: ExcellentFacilities: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
1 review
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Map
Map