Profile

Cover photo
Chris Dolan
Works at Sony Creative Software
Attended University of Wisconsin-Madison
768 followers|11,701,019 views
AboutPostsCollections

Stream

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
I've watched the first two episodes of Syfy's show "The Expanse" and so far I'm very underwhelmed. The setting and effects are quite interesting, but the characters and plot are dull and the dialog is clichéd.

Does it get better? Should I stick it out? It's so widely praised in my circles that I feel like I'm missing something. I have not read the books.
1
Henk Poley's profile photoChris Dolan's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Henk Poley thanks! What a cool visualization tool! I had not seen that site before.
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Brilliant. I think all the browsers will adopt this idea quickly.
 
"When a page with a password field is not delivered securely, Firefox displays a lock with a red strikethrough in the address bar..."

Hooray! Full details: mzl.la/1SQqC3p.
4 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is really very cool. This is the kind of big-picture knowledge that I think every astronomy-interested person should have in his/her mental arsenal.

And the cocktail-party-friendly quote: "The gold in your jewelry was likely made from neutron stars during collisions that may have been visible as short-duration gamma-ray bursts."
 
Where Your Elements Came From
Image Credit: Cmglee (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL, via Wikimedia Commons
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160125.html

The hydrogen in your body, present in every molecule of water, came from the Big Bang. There are no other appreciable sources of hydrogen in the universe. The carbon in your body was made by nuclear fusion in the interior of stars, as was the oxygen. Much of the iron in your body was made during supernovas of stars that occurred long ago and far away. The gold in your jewelry was likely made from neutron stars during collisions that may have been visible as short-duration gamma-ray bursts. Elements like phosphorus and copper are present in our bodies in only small amounts but are essential to the functioning of all known life. The featured periodic table is color coded to indicate humanity's best guess as to the nuclear origin of all known elements. The sites of nuclear creation of some elements, such as copper, are not really well known and are continuing topics of observational and computational research.
56 comments on original post
115
24
EDSON FRANCISCO FLAUSINO SENE's profile photoAntoine Joseph's profile photoifrah khan's profile photoSuseela Gandikota's profile photo
10 comments
 
نااااايس رؤؤؤؤعٌهّـ 
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Another cool ISS transit, this time Saturn. To me the most fascinating fact is that the photographer had a tolerance of only +/- 20m to put his telescope on the transit line.
 
ISS transit in front of Saturn

"After my ISS transit in front of Jupiter I had more experience with the challenge of photographing the very fast ISS (27.000 km/h!!!) in front of a planet. Everything went more fluently than half a year before even though Saturn (27 arcseconds) appears to be a little smaller compared to Jupiter (45 arcseconds).

"The weather was announced to be unstable but right in time the eastern sky cleared up and I had one of the best seeing conditions I've ever witnessed. Perfect timing! Unfortunately the sky in the west was cloudy so I could see the station first when it passed half way up the sky."

Image credit: Julian Weßel astrophotography

Read more and watch video of transit: http://buff.ly/1ltQaoB
9 comments on original post
57
2
Rachel Terrones's profile photoCraig Wallace's profile photoabhay sai vinay.n's profile photo
 
That's pretty cool 
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
The "Wow! signal" is worth reading about if you haven't heard of it before. The Wikipedia article (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wow!_signal) is pretty fun if a bit technical. This new finding that there might have been a comet or two in the right place/time for the signal is cool and intriguing. But I'm pretty skeptical that it's the correct explanation -- even the authors of the paper point out a flaw in their own theory that both radio receivers in the Big Ear should have detected a comet signal instead of just one.
 
Was The Wow! Signal Caused By Comets?

The Wow! signal is one of the great mysteries of radio astronomy. It was detected in 1977 by the Big Ear radio telescope, and is so named because of its powerful signal. It’s origin is unclear, but one possible explanation is that is was an intentional signal from an alien intelligence.

Big Ear was a drift telescope, and used the rotation of the Earth to scan the sky for radio signals. It was designed to run for long periods autonomously as a way to scan the heavens. The Wow! signal came from a specific region of the sky, and emitted a strong signal at 21 cm wavelengths, which is an emission light produced by atomic hydrogen. It was observed for 72 seconds, which is how long it would take a specific point in the sky to drift across the range of the telescope.

One interesting aspect of the signal is that it doesn’t clearly originate from a known object. The area of the sky where the signal originated doesn’t have anything that would produce a strong hydrogen line. But new work suggests that back in 1977 there was something there, possibly two somethings.

Between the end of July 27 and mid August of 1977, two comets known as 266P/Christensen and P/2008 Y2 (Gibbs) were in the vicinity of the Wow! signal location. Comets are known to emit gas and dust, including monotomic hydrogen. So there may have been a hydrogen cloud in the region during that time. The Wow! signal was detected on August 15, 1977.

While this is not the definitive answer, it would explain some of the strange aspects about the signal, such as why later observations of the region didn’t detect any signal. Since the comets had moved on, any hydrogen cloud would have dispersed and any signal from it would have faded.

So there’s no need for aliens after all.


The Wow! signal may have been caused by comets.
29 comments on original post
38
3
Chris Jordan's profile photoCraig Wallace's profile photoВладимир Вареник's profile photoICF philanthropist's profile photo
2 comments
 
Cool
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Not a great article but an excellent headline. :-)

I've seen some of these HDR TVs in person at NAB last spring and some in-house prototypes of HDR production monitors and they are really impressive. Combined with 4K+ resolutions, these things are starting to look like real life.

(yes, I work for Sony but I'm not affiliated with the group that makes Sony's TVs)

When I walked up to Sony’s new demo for its forthcoming Backlight Master Drive technology, a rep asked me to please not stand so close with my camera—the technology is still patent pending.
1
Add a comment...
In their circles
889 people
Have them in circles
768 people
Julian Lombardi's profile photo
Yo Kok's profile photo
Prabhat Kumar's profile photo
Roger Maddy's profile photo
‫ابو جاسم‬‎'s profile photo
Alamin Sharif's profile photo
Walter Mankowski's profile photo
Shawn Dodds's profile photo
Dan Perry's profile photo

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Here's a good article about +Michael Masnick: the founder of techdirt.com, coiner of the phrase "Streisand Effect", leader of the anti-SOPA movement. I met Mike several times in college through his sister, but regretfully I never got to know him.

1
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Proud of my city. :-)
 
Madison's once-controversial Lead Service Replacement Program now becoming a model for other cities. You can't see it. You can't taste it. But the impact of lead in drinking water can be devastating. “Lead is a hidden contaminant,” says Madison Water Utility water quality manager Joe Grande.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hilarious
 
Finally! A feature fim shot entirely on a Prius Backup Camera.
New Courses. The History of Hollywood Censorship · The Science and History of Popcorn · The History and Psychology of Horror · The Business of Watching Movies · Color as an Intrinsic Filmmaking Tool · The Mysterious Art of Slit Scan · History and Techniques of Modern Chromakey ...
2 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
What a great article. These behind-the-scenes details make Dylan's ISS+Moon picture all that much more impressive.
 
About a week ago a new website called "PhotographingSpace.com" went live and one of my articles is the first feature up.

Once again I've managed to slip undetected into esteemed company including +Mark Gee , +Michael A. Phillips, +Cory Schmitz and +Tanja Schmitz, +Paul Stewart and other legends.

The site is already a great resource if you just want to learn how to take star trails or milky way photos, but will keep growing from here with any luck.
If you want me to write about anything in particular, let me know!

... dylan.
--------
Part 1: "How I got an APOD" (Planning and Acquisition)
http://photographingspace.com/how-i-got-an-apod-dylan-odonnell/

Part 2 : "Processing Example: ISS Transit of the Moon"
http://photographingspace.com/how-i-got-an-apod-dylan-odonnell-part-2/
I can’t tell you how to get an APOD. What I can share with you is how I planned, acquired, and processed that image that went viral, eventually to be shared by NASA crew members on the space station past and present, world media outlets, and even ESA. I was lucky that the astronomers who …
5 comments on original post
76
2
Collin Mckeag's profile photoMahesh Rathod's profile photoCraig Wallace's profile photoMarcos Moreira's profile photo
2 comments
 
Good
Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
The article amusingly starts with "Jupiter, that blustery ball of noxious gas, ..." to reinforce that the Earth has a complex relationship with the other planets. The Gizmodo article clarifies that "Jupiter’s inward migration swept rocky planetesimals into the Sun, effectively clearing out the inner solar system" which was likely very important for the Earth as we know it today.
 
The Bizarre Way Jupiter Helped Life Evolve on Earth

“It’s been taught somewhat dogmatically, that Jupiter protects our solar system,” astrophysicist Kevin Grazier told Gizmodo. “But that’s just not how it works at all.”

Indeed, the so-called Jupiter shield hypothesis hasn’t held up under scientific scrutiny, and Grazier’s latest JPL-funded research, which appears next month in the journal Astrobiology, may lay the idea to rest once and for all. His models show that Jupiter doesn’t—and never has—protected Earth from unruly space rocks. Rather, the prodigious gravity of Jupiter and Saturn has been slinging icy material our way for eons.

What’s more, those comets probably delivered the water, oxygen, and other volatiles that are essential to life as we know it. Without Jupiter’s rain of cometary terror, life on Earth may never have evolved.

Read more: http://buff.ly/1SDKWEc
11 comments on original post
101
4
Lourdes Rodriguez's profile photoJoli Coy's profile photoDe Rt's profile photoGregory AG Robinson's profile photo
3 comments
 
i Know this planet it Jupiter i was working on this Planet

Add a comment...

Chris Dolan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Very nice. The animations are quite impressively done.
1
Add a comment...
Chris's Collections
People
In their circles
889 people
Have them in circles
768 people
Julian Lombardi's profile photo
Yo Kok's profile photo
Prabhat Kumar's profile photo
Roger Maddy's profile photo
‫ابو جاسم‬‎'s profile photo
Alamin Sharif's profile photo
Walter Mankowski's profile photo
Shawn Dodds's profile photo
Dan Perry's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Programmer, software architect
Employment
  • Sony Creative Software
    Staff Software Engineer, 2012 - present
  • Avid Technology
    Sr Principal Software Engineer, 2007 - 2012
  • Clotho Advanced Media
    Sr Software Developer, 2001 - 2007
  • Univ Wisconsin, Astronomy Dept
    Research Assistant, 1994 - 2000
Story
Tagline
programmer, cyclist, gamer, former astronomer
Bragging rights
#1 Google result for "constellations"; Toughest bicycle ride: 125 miles + 11,000 ft climbing
Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Astronomy, PhD, 1994 - 2000
  • Cornell University
    Astronomy, 1990 - 1994
  • Derryfield School
    1986 - 1990