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Chris Dolan
Works at Sony Creative Software
Attended University of Wisconsin-Madison
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Chris Dolan

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There are 206 bones in the adult human body, but we're born with almost 300 (as we grow, some bones fuse together). #ScienceFunFacts
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Hiu
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As the press release below states, MAGIX has acquired Vegas Pro and several other Sony software applications. MAGIX did not purchase Catalyst Browse, Catalyst Prepare, nor Catalyst Edit (and some others) -- those are products I will continue to work on here at Sony.

Some of my former Sony colleagues have taken jobs with MAGIX (in fact, MAGIX appears to be hiring more: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/opening-our-new-develoment-studio-usa-madison-wi-soon-klaus-schmidt). I truly wish them well and I believe that Vegas has a strong future. A number of those people were part of Sonic Foundry before Sony purchased Vegas from them back in 2003, so this transition has an interesting precedent. 
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Nice chart. It's easy to forget just how far the Oort cloud extends. Sparsely filled with (mostly)small cold stuff, even now we know of relatively few members of this "cloud". The closer-in Kuiper Belt is easier to study.
 
Welcome to the Sun's Neighborhood! | NASA
This diagram illustrates the locations of the star systems closest to our Sun. The year when the distance to each system was determined is listed after the system's name.

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, found two of the four closest systems: the binary brown dwarf WISE 1049-5319 and the brown dwarf WISE J085510.83-071442.5. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope helped pin down the location of the latter object.

The closest system to the sun is a trio of stars that consists of Alpha Centauri, a close companion to it and Proxima Centauri.

Credit: NASA/Penn State University

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+Penn State University 
+National Science Teachers Association 
+National Science Foundation 
+PBS KIDS 
+PBS Parents 

#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #SolarSystem #Stars #Cosmos #Universe #WISE #Infrared #Telescope #JPL #Caltech #Pasadena #California #USA #UnitedStates #Diagram #Infographic
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Hmm
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Interesting, I did not know about the chains either.
 
Something I did not know: at the Statue of Liberty's feet are broken chains, and in the original design of the statue, she did not hold a book in her left hand, but rather the chains she had shattered.

Edouard de Laboulaye and Frédéric Batholdi, the two men behind the statue, were fervent abolitionists, and the initial impetus for the statue was the ratification of the 13th Amendment.

The final design of the statue, in which the chains are visible only from a helicopter, was the result of strong objections from the project's American backers, upon whom de Laboulaye and Batholdi were relying to fund the pedestal and the site; they wanted no mentions of slavery. In 1885-6, the United States was fully in the throes of "reconciliation," the process of the official forgetting of pre-War history, the rehabilitation of the political image of the South, and the formalization of the "New Slavery" system in both North and South which was to prove so immensely profitable. Such a public decree of slavery as an evil, and the antithesis of liberty, would have been an entirely unwanted political problem to those who wanted the country to "just get over it."

The chains remained virtually unknown until recently, with even the National Park Service not mentioning their existence in its publications. Ordinary tourists never saw them; thanks to the steep angle of the plinth, they're completely invisible from the ground. It was only in 2011 that (for reasons not fully clear) this changed, and the USNPS now discusses this history at length on its site.

Via +Ralf Haring and +Peter da Silva.
Sharon Kyle: The story behind the creation of the Statue of Liberty was suppressed for more than 125 years. Finally, the National Park Service includes literature that explains the shackles and chains.
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This article from 2014 is fascinating: electrons with a preferred left-handed spin might be more likely to destroy right-handed organic molecules, and that could possibly explain why all Earthly life forms use left-handed amino acids. (note the weasel words "might", "possibly", etc).

I found this link in an also-interesting article shared by +Ciro Villa about artificially creating right-handed DNA: http://www.nature.com/news/mirror-image-enzyme-copies-looking-glass-dna-1.19918
'Left-handed' electrons destroy certain organic molecules faster than their mirror versions.
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Cool. Just 10 million years from virtually no oxygen in our atmosphere to oxygen-caused weathering of rocks. That's a rapid change, 2.33 billion years ago.
 
Today, 21 percent of the air we breathe is made up of molecular oxygen. But this gas was not always in such ample, life-sustaining supply, and in fact was largely absent from the atmosphere for the first 2 billion years of Earth's history. When, then, did oxygen first accumulate in the atmosphere?
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Awesome
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Wow, this is great! Troggs cover: "Wildling, I think I love you"
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Chris Dolan

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"there are hundreds of billions of King Tut’s atoms inside you right now ... and if you want to go even farther back, trillions of atoms that were a part of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, Sue, at the moment she died."

"approximately one atom in everyone’s lungs, at any moment, was in Caesar’s (or Lenin’s, or George Washington’s, or Alexandre Dumas’) lungs as they exhaled their final breath."

The answer is larger than you might think, and applies in some shocking ways!“The beauty of a living thing is not the atoms that go into it, but the way th…
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Really 
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I mentioned this before, but it's worth repeating: this Chrome extension to control the playback rate of HTML5 video has become an essential tool in my daily use. This has saved me a couple hours already since I installed it.
 
Trying to catch up on the gajillion awesome videos from Google I/O? Well... just pushed an updated for "Video Speed Controller" extension: bit.ly/1l8UlFq - lots of improvements and bugfixes, give it a try!

p.s. In related news, it recently crossed 100K installs! \o/
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Don't stop your pictures.they are great
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"Cat puns freak meowt. Seriously. I'm not kitten." :-)
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Thanks...
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"When it comes to smartphones, sometimes we feel let down" Not the best way to start a marketing campaign. I stopped reading after that sentence.
 
Meet the new Moto G Family: Whichever you choose, you get more of what matters most.
When it comes to smartphones, sometimes we feel let down. The things that matter most — like taking great photos at our kids’ soccer games, video chatting with mom or having all-day battery life — simply don’t live up to our expectations. It shouldn’t be th...
When it comes to smartphones, sometimes we feel let down. The things that matter most — like taking great photos at our kids' soccer games, video chatting with mom or having all-day battery life — simply don't live up to our expectations. It shouldn't be this way. Smartphones should focus on ...
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Very nice
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Now that's a good use of an animated image!
 
When the star that created this supernova remnant exploded in 1572, it was so bright that it was visible during the day. And though he wasn't the first or only person to observe this stellar spectacle, the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe wrote a book about his extensive observations of the event, gaining the honor of it being named after him.
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I now have basic understanding of the Higgs Effect,in giving mass to particles that would otherwise move at light speed through the universe.
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Chris's Collections
People
In their circles
742 people
Have them in circles
913 people
Olivia Taylor's profile photo
David Wheeler's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Programmer, software architect
Employment
  • Sony Creative Software
    Staff Software Engineer, 2012 - present
  • Avid Technology
    Sr Principal Software Engineer, 2007 - 2012
  • Clotho Advanced Media
    Sr Software Developer, 2001 - 2007
  • Univ Wisconsin, Astronomy Dept
    Research Assistant, 1994 - 2000
Story
Tagline
programmer, cyclist, gamer, former astronomer
Bragging rights
#1 Google result for "constellations"; Toughest bicycle ride: 125 miles + 11,000 ft climbing
Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Astronomy, PhD, 1994 - 2000
  • Cornell University
    Astronomy, 1990 - 1994
  • Derryfield School
    1986 - 1990