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Chris Dolan
Works at Sony Creative Software
Attended University of Wisconsin-Madison
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Chris Dolan

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"GDB will be the weapon we fight with if we accidentally build Skynet."
Ha!!
Judgement Day. GDB will be the weapon we fight with if we accidentally build Skynet. Posted by gbenson on Friday, April 17th, 2015, at 20:07, and filed under GDB. Follow any responses to this entry with the RSS 2.0 feed. You can post a comment, or trackback from your site.
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Heh, I finished reading Voices by Ursula K. Le Guin tonight. Her stories always take place in worlds that hint at something more, a rich backstory. But it wasn't until I started this post that I realized it was the second book in a trilogy. Oops... 
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:--)
 
I was trying to explain to someone the difference between Java and JavaScript. "It is like the difference between Star Trek and Star Wars."

Java is Star Trek. It was first, and it is all uniforms, regulations, and red alerts. JavaScript is Star Wars. Grit, chaos, and mysticism.
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Here's the first public announcement of what my team has been working on. The Catalyst Production Suite includes v2.0 of Catalyst Prepare, which debuted last fall, and v1.0 of Catalyst Edit. We're very proud of Edit: it's a super easy-to-use video timeline editor.

I'll be at the NAB trade show in a couple weeks showing off the latest work on Vegas 13, Sound Forge, Spectral Layers as well as these new apps.
MIDDLETON, Wis., March 25, 2015- Sony Creative Software Introduces New Media Production Tools at the 2015 NAB Show. Catalyst Prepare™, Catalyst Edit™, and...
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I'll be sure to stop by and see 
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"At about 14 TeV, the new collision energies of the LHC are higher than anything we’ve ever created, but they aren’t nearly the upper limit of what we’ve observed. [...] the highest energy cosmic ray ever detected was about 400 TeV"

... and that didn't destroy the Earth. Nice. This is a concise debunking of the risks of the LHC that I'm going to hang on to for later dissemination.
Brian Koberlein originally shared:
 
You've Doomed Us All!

Later this month the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be up and running again, this time at nearly double the previous collision energies. It will be the highest energy at which we have actively collided particles. While this is great news for scientists eager to discover new physics, it has some people worried that the LHC could open a pandora’s box of unexpected consequences, such as the creation of a micro black hole that could engulf the planet. The standard response is to state that even if the LHC were to create micro black holes, they would pose no risk. But given that we’ve never collided particles at this energy, how do we know?

On a basic level, a black hole is simply matter packed so densely that it forms an event horizon. The key is the density, not the overall mass, so in principle extremely tiny black holes are theoretically possible. Realistically, however, the strong forces between colliding particles would prevent them from reaching a density necessary to form a black hole. Besides, on such small scales the particle/wave nature of objects can’t be ignored, and quantum theory is very clear that the quantum “size” of particles prevents the necessary density. So conventional physics says that the LHC won’t produce any black holes, even at these new energy levels.

There are some exotic theoretical ideas that predict the creation of black holes at the new LHC levels. These models aren’t taken very seriously, but we are looking for new physics after all. On the off chance that micro black holes are created, does that mean we’re doomed? No, because quantum theory also says that black holes evaporate due to Hawking radiation. The rate of evaporation depends upon the size of the black hole, so that the smaller the black hole, the faster it evaporates. If a micro black hole on the order of LHC energies were to form, it would evaporate before anything else could be captured by it. So there’s no danger of creating a black hole that starts devouring the Earth.

But that’s all theory, you might say, how can we be sure our understanding of the risks are correct? At about 14 TeV, the new collision energies of the LHC are higher than anything we’ve ever created, but they aren’t nearly the upper limit of what we’ve observed. Cosmic rays strike the Earth with much greater energies all the time. In fact the highest energy cosmic ray ever detected was about 400 TeV, which is well beyond any energy level we could attain for the foreseeable future. None of these cosmic rays have created a black hole that consumes Earth, and cosmic rays have been striking our planet for billions of years.

So we can look forward to new discoveries from the LHC, with no worries of a doomsday scenario.
As the LHC begins running at its highest energy yet, do we need to worry that it will unleash something dangerous like black holes? Not in the slightest.
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This is an excellent article: concise and very readable, and uses pizza delivery guys as an analogy for internet packets. :-)

"[In] the FCC's new Network Neutrality rules [...] one particular point has caught the eye of network engineers everywhere: the statement that packet loss should be published as a performance metric, with the consequent implication that ISPs should strive to achieve as low a value as possible. That would be very bad thing to do. I'll give a brief, oversimplified explanation of why"
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Vicky is scowling because she is thinking "Scott! Haiku is 5-7-5, not 7-5-5!" Ducky, the pragmatist, replies "But at least he got the seasonal reference, Vicky."
 
This is the dividing line. Vicky is in spring. Ducky is in winter. #Maine #PortlandME #EastEndBeach #EnglishSetter #EnglishSetters #SonyA7
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Ha. I wasn't even trying to write a haiku!
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Chris Dolan

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Christian's excerpt is the best line of the article.

/cc +Scott Dolan
 
"Like many great writers, he has a specific imaginative territory that he keeps going back to, but that territory happens to be where a lot of us now find ourselves living. Not only in terms of Google Glass and Uber, which are comparatively trivial, but in terms of the gap between rich and poor, the impunity of globalised commerce, the declining relevance of the west. It's a crime that he's not regarded as one of our most important novelists."
William Gibson's science-fiction novel, 30 years old this month, leapt into cyberspace almost before it existed, writes Ed Cumming
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I like the way this article ends. Well done, +Brian Koberlein 
Brian Koberlein originally shared:
 
Symmetry

Suppose you want to balance a ruler horizontally on your finger.  To to this you’ll likely place your finger in the middle of the ruler, so that half is on one side and half on the other.  Intuitively, you recognize that the middle makes both sides symmetrical, which is why you put your finger there.  In other words there is a connection between the symmetry of the ruler and the physics of balance.

Symmetry is something we all tend to recognize, but probably find hard to quantify.  Things like mirror symmetry are easy to describe, but what about the image above.  It gives a feeling of symmetry, but exactly how would you describe it?  In the same way, we generally have an intuitive feel for the way symmetry is related to the physical world, such as balancing a ruler on our finger, but quantifying that connection is difficult.

This is why Emmy Noether should probably be put in the same group as Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein as one of the greatest physicists who ever lived, because in 1918 she published an elegant and mathematically precise connection between symmetry and physics.  It is now known as Noether’s Theorem, and it is so subtle and powerful it is hard to describe without mathematical formalism.

But I’ll give it a try.

In physics, symmetry is the ability to change a part of a system while the whole remains the same.  As an example, imagine if you were standing on a perfectly flat surface that extends as far as you can see.  If you were to close your eyes, take one step forward, then open your eyes, it would appear that nothing has changed.  You have moved forward (a change), but the surface appears unchanged (symmetry).

Through Noether’s theorem, such a symmetry of linear motion is connected to the fact that an object in motion will continue that motion unless something acts on it, what we call conservation of linear momentum.  In the same way, if you were to close your eyes, turn to the left or right a bit, then open your eyes again, the surface would appear unchanged.  This symmetry in rotation is connected to fact that a rotating object like the Earth will continue to rotate, which we call conservation of angular momentum.

But Noether didn’t just show these simple connections, she showed in general how every conservation law in physics is connected to a physical symmetry. Conservation in energy connects to a symmetry in time, conservation of charge to a symmetry in gauge, and on and on.  It is a connection that lies at the heart of every modern physical theory, and has deepened our understanding of earlier theories such as Newton’s mechanics and Einstein’s relativity.  Emmy Noether single-handedly revolutionized the way we understand physical theories.

Despite this fact, Noether is not widely known outside the physics and mathematics community.  Part of this is due to the fact that her work revolutionized existing physical theories rather than being a physical theory in its own right, but another reason is that she was a woman at a time when the work of women was often marginalized. Despite her world-class work, she struggled against discrimination in her field, and received a fraction of the recognition she deserved.  Although things have gotten better for women in the sciences, it isn’t quite what you would consider fully balanced.

So the next time you read about the discovery of cosmic inflation, or the search for supersymmetric particles, or the development of a theory of everything, think of Emmy Noether, and her theorem that lies at the heart of all of these ideas.  And remember that the sciences could always use a little more symmetry.
Symmetry is something we all tend to recognize, but probably find hard to quantify. Things like mirror symmetry are easy to describe, but what about the image above. It gives a feeling of symmetry, but exactly how would you describe it?
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Nice. I recommend looking at these pictures, as well as the moon ones.
 
The Sun replaced with other stars, "based on the absolute brightness, spectral class, and radius" of the various substitutions. Which is to say, the artists are aware that more than the sky would look different if you actually made the substitution.

I do wonder about the colors, I think we all learned from that dress business that these things are tricky at best.
Sun replaced with other stars. Internetmaps by JaySimons. This visualization shows how the sunset could look like to a human observer if our Sun was replaced by some of the other stars in our galaxy with different sizes and magnitudes, namely Barnard's Star, Gliese 581, Tau Ceti, Kepler-23, ...
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Repeating what I think is a key line: one high-resolution DNA-sequencing study of breast cancer last year couldn’t find two cells within one tumor that were genetically identical

As a layperson, I find that to be a very surprising and profound discovery.
 
One recent study of kidney cancers found that no two patients had exactly the same set of genetic mistakes; in fact, no two tumors within the same patient had the same mutations. Taking it one step further, one high-resolution DNA-sequencing study of breast cancer last year couldn’t find two cells within one tumor that were genetically identical
In January, the pharmaceutical company Roche paid more than a billion dollars to buy about half of a small company called Foundation…
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I'll bet that DNA repair mechanisms are switched off in most cancers, and this allows more mutations to happen.
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I just learned a great workaround for my biggest peeve of +K-9 Mail = "Issue 861: Can not copy of move message that is not synchronized with the server".

If you accidentally delete a message from an IMAP Inbox, and then go to the Trash folder to try to move it back, the app initially does not let you because it doesn't realize the message is present in the server-side trash. But if you refresh the Trash folder (pull down the top) then the app realizes that the message is indeed movable and all goes well from there on.

Wow, I've been suffering this issue for several years and just never saw the solution.
K-9 Mail is an advanced email client for Android
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Thank you. My K-9 uses a pop3 to recieve mail so it's useless to refresh trash.
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Have them in circles
594 people
Contact Jeevan's profile photo
Jason Gullickson's profile photo
Peter Haller's profile photo
Walter Mankowski's profile photo
Maruarai Colombel's profile photo
Stanislav Iermakov's profile photo
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Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Astronomy, PhD, 1994 - 2000
  • Cornell University
    Astronomy, 1990 - 1994
  • Derryfield School
    1986 - 1990
Story
Bragging rights
I was the #1 Google result for "constellations" for about 12 years (ended 2013); Toughest bicycle ride: 125 miles + 11,000 ft climbing
Work
Occupation
Programmer, software architect
Employment
  • Sony Creative Software
    Staff Software Engineer, 2012 - present
  • Avid Technology
    Sr Principal Software Engineer, 2007 - 2012
  • Clotho Advanced Media
    Sr Software Developer, 2001 - 2007