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Chris Dacus
149 followers -
I'm a photographer and landscape architect that has been exploring the island of O'ahu for over 20 years.
I'm a photographer and landscape architect that has been exploring the island of O'ahu for over 20 years.

149 followers
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BMT 2018 or bust!

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Lantern Festival
Lantern Festival 2016 by Chris Dacus Lantern Festival 2016 by  Chris Dacus Lantern Festival 2016 by  Chris Dacus Lantern Festival 2016 by  Chris Dacus Lantern Festival 2016 by  Chris Dacus Lantern Festival Ala Moana Regional Park, Island of O'ahu A differen...

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Midnight Sudbury Photo: Chris Dacus Midnight Sudbury Sudbury, Massachusetts Like a deer looking at headlights, time to get off the road!

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Ulupō

Ulupō Heiau overlooks Kawainui Marsh (Hawaiian for “The big water”). Kawainui Marsh is Hawaii’s largest remaining wetland encompassing 830 acres.

Ulupō Heiau is one of the oldest cultural sites on O`ahu and is the second-largest remaining heiau on the island. The oral history says that the heiau was constructed by menehune, who were mythical masters of stone work and engineering. The Ulupō Heiau is comprised of stones from as far away as Kualoa. The heiau is 140 feet by 180 feet and 30 feet high. Ulupō means “night inspiration” and may have been used as a luakini heaiu where human sacrifices occurred.

In 1972, Ulupō Heiau was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was listed on the Hawai‘i Register of Historic Places in 1981.
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Ulupō
Ulupo Heiau by Chris Dacus Ulupō  Ulupō Heiau overlooks Kawainui Marsh (Hawaiian for “The big
water”). Kawainui Marsh is Hawaii’s largest remaining wetland encompassing 830
acres. Ulupō Heiau is one of the oldest cultural sites on O`ahu and
is the second-la...

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Ka'iwi Coastline LaveLava Tube
Lava Tube Sunrise by Chris Dacus Lava Tube Goodness Kaiwi Coastline, Island of O'ahu Once a year, when the sun rises on the shorter days and the sun becomes aligned with this lava tube on the Ka'iwi Coastline. Like a pilgrimage I head out every year and man...

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Lava Tube Goodness
Kaiwi Coastline, Island of O'ahu

Once a year, when the sun rises on the shorter days and the sun becomes aligned with this lava tube on the Ka'iwi Coastline. Like a pilgrimage I head out every year and manage a couple of mornings to grab some shots. This year I arrived at sunrise two mornings in row.

Happy new years!

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Kaʻena Point
Island of O'ahu, Hawai'i

Kaʻena Point is the westernmost tip of land on the island of Oʻahu. In Hawaiian, kaʻena means 'the heat'. The area was named after a brother or cousin of Pele who accompanied her from Kahiki. The State of Hawaiʻi has designated the point as a Natural Area Reserve to protect nesting Laysan Albatrosses and wedge-tailed Shearwaters, Hawaiian monk seals, and the native vegetation that has been actively restored. In 1899, the Oahu Railway and Land Company constructed a railway that traveled 70 miles from Honolulu via Kaena Point to Kahuku to transport sugarcane. Most of the tracks were destroyed due to a tsunami in 1946. Today, parts of the railroad tracks are still visible along the Ka'ena point trail. I thought I saw a railroad tie but didn’t see any tracks.

The Hawaiians called their departing-places leina-a-ka-ʻuhane, or leap of the soul, and they are in general found in the northwest of an island. On Oahu, Kaena Point is the leina-a-ka-ʻuhane. Ancestral spirit helpers would guide souls into the underworld, that is if your soul was ready…

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La'ielohelohe Beach
Lāʻie, Hawai’i

Laie Beach Park was originally called called La'ielohelohe after the sister of La'ieikawai. In the early 20th century it became Pahumoa Beach Park, named after Pahumoa "John" Kamakeʻeʻāina (1879–1944), a fisherman from Lāʻie Maloʻo in the late 19th century and early 20th century who lived here and kept his nets on the beach adjacent to Kōloa Stream. He was well known in Lāʻie for his generosity and gave fish to everyone in the village, especially to those who could not fish for themselves. Pahumoa conducted many hukilau, a method of community net fishing. His family, the Kamakeʻeʻāinas, were a well known fishing family in the area, and stories can still be found today of their abilities in fishing. 

The beach changed names in the 1950s, when a group of students at the Church College of the Pacific (now Brigham Young University–Hawaii) called the beach "Pounders" after the pounding shorebreak that provided popular bodysurfing rides; the nickname stuck.

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