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Chris Dacus
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Chris Dacus

Natural Landscapes  - 
 
Na Pali Coastline
Island of Kaua'i, Hawai'i
 
The Nā Pali coast extends southwest starting at Keʻe Beach extending all the way to Polihale State Park. The na pali (meaning high cliffs) along the shoreline rise as much as 4,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean, making the cliffs some the tallest in the Pacific.
 
Although inaccessible to vehicles, this coast can be enjoyed by hiking or helicopter, or my favorite from the ocean during the summer months when the seas are calm. The Kalalau Trail traverses 11 miles and crosses five major valleys before reaching Kalalau Beach at the base of Kalalau Valley. There are countless waterfalls in the valleys above a Kalalau.
 
This was one of the most incredible sunsets in my life. Just surreal colors.
 
www.hawaiiunveiled.com
This blog is Chris Dacus's adventures, reflections and discoveries about the islands of Hawai'i with sound, video and photography.
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+Photonature Cathy Il était très romantique .
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Horseshoe Bend
Vertigo at Horseshoe Bend by Chris Dacus My Vertigo Moment at Horseshoe Bend Page, Arizona Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near Page, Arizona. The edge of the cliff is 4,200 feet above sea level and the Colorado Ri...
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Ko Olina
O'ahu, Hawai'i

Ko Olina, or “Place of Joy” in Hawaiian, is part of an original royal land division that extended from the waters off Pearl Harbor to the summit of the Waianae Mountains. The area was a sacred place used for rest and relaxation by Hawaiian chiefs, like Kakuhihewa. Kamehameha the Great and his wife Ka’ahumanu were frequent visitors, bathing in the protected water of its reef-sheltered coves, fishing, and participating in religious ceremonies. Hawaii's last monarch, Lili’uokalani, also came to Ko Olina. 

James Campbell, a business pioneer with deep roots here in Hawai‘i, first purchased lands on the Ewa Plain in 1877 and later developed the great plantations on O‘ahu. One of Mr. Campbell’s four daughters, Alice Kamokila Campbell, leased a portion of the land in 1939 to use as her private residence. The beachfront property originally included a thatched Hawaiian house within the lush, tropical surroundings. She named her slice of paradise, “Lanikuhonua,” as she felt it was the place “Where Heaven Meets the Earth.”

Around the turn of the last century, the Oahu Railway passed just inland of Ko Olina, and because of a lack of convenient public transportation, many teenagers from the neighboring camps of the Ewa Plantation caught the train to the pools. 

Lanikuhonua’s place in history continued beyond serving as a playground for Hawaiian royalty. During World War II, Campbell invited the United States Organization (USO) to use Lanikuhonua as an army and navy recreation area. The area was nicknamed “Camp Bell” by the soldiers.


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+Sanal Kumar thanks!
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Kualakaʻi Beach Fisherman
KualakaʻI Beach in Kalaeloa, Oʻahu.

Also known as White Plains Beach. A popular Ewa Beach surf spot known to have a wave like Canoes surf break in Waikiki. Kalaeloa literally means “long point” in Hawaiian, most likely receiving this name for its appearance from the Diamond Head end of Mamala Bay, from which it appears to be an extremely long point. Kalaeloa is the original name for Barber's Point, Oʻahu, where Captain Henry Barber went aground in 1796. In 2000, following the closure of BPNAS, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names approved the Redevelopment Commission's application to change the name of the area back to the traditional Hawaiian name Kalaeloa.
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Midsummer Night's Gleam
Foster Botanical Garden

Celebrating Midsummer Night's Gleam, Foster Botanical Garden was turned into a magical wonderland with 2,500 luminaries  sparkling along the pathways weaving through the garden.

The garden consists of the Upper Terrace (the oldest part of the garden); Middle Terraces (palms, aroids, heliconias, gingers); Economic Garden (herbs, spices, dyes, poisons); Prehistoric Glen (primitive plants planted in 1965); Lyon Orchid Garden; and Hybrid Orchid Display.

Foster Garden traces its beginning to 1853 when Queen Kalama leased a small area of land to William Hillebrand, a young German doctor. A botanist as well as a physician, he and his wife built a home in the upper terrace area of the present garden. 

In 1884, the Hillebrand property was sold to Thomas R. Foster and his wife Mary E. Foster, who continued to develop the garden at their homesite. Upon her death in 1930, Mary Foster bequeathed the land and her home to the City and County of Honolulu, with the provision that the city accept and forever keep and properly maintain the (gardens) as a public and tropical park to be known and called Foster Park. At the time, the gardens were roughly 5.5 acres.

Dr. Harold Lyon, the first director of Foster Garden, introduced thousands of new plants and trees to Hawaii, and started its famous orchid collection. Paul Weissich, director from 1957 to 1989, expanded Foster Garden to 14 acres.

The Garden is the inspiration for a line in Joni Mitchell's 1970 folk song "Big Yellow Taxi": "Took all the trees, put 'em in a tree museum / Then charge people a dollar and a half just to see 'em."

Foster was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

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Natural Landscapes  - 
 
Fins
How were arches formed? Over time, parallel fractures in surface rock eroded to form "fins." As the process of erosion continued, arches were created where the fins were worn completely through. This was an impressive fin at the Devil’s Garden Primitive Loop at Arches National Park.
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Na Pali Coastline
Na Pali Coastline by Chris Dacus Na Pali Coastline The Nā Pali coast extends southwest starting at Keʻe Beach
extending all the way to Polihale State Park. The na pali (meaning high cliffs)
along the shoreline rise as much as 4,000 feet above the Pacific Oc...
Na Pali Coastline, Na Pali, Kalalau, Kauai
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My Vertigo Moment at Horseshoe Bend
Page, Arizona

Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near Page, Arizona. The edge of the cliff is 4,200 feet above sea level and the Colorado River is at 3,200 feet above sea level making it a breathtaking 1,000 foot drop. Keep in mind that there are no guardrails and no overlook. There were hundreds of people at the cliff’s edge at this sunset. You just casually walk on the giant plateau until suddenly the abyss opens up under your feet. You breath is taken away, and even the bravest of us feel dizzy and weak for a moment. To get this photograph, I mounted the camera on a tripod and extended the tripod over the cliff edge. I get a strong sense of vertigo and an inspiration to jump whenever I am at a cliff....weird combination for sure.

Long ago, as the river meandered southward toward the sea, it always chose the steepest downward slope. This downward journey did not always occur in a straight line, and sometimes the river made wide circles and meanders. As the Colorado Plateau uplifted about 5 million years ago, the rivers that meandered across the ancient landscape were trapped in their beds. The rivers cut through the rock, deep and fast, seeking a new natural level. Here at Horseshoe Bend, the Colorado River did just that, and as the river cut down through the layers of sandstone, it created a 270° horseshoe-shaped bend in the canyon.

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ko olina
Ko Olina by Chris Dacus Ko Olina Ko Olina, or “Place of Joy” in Hawaiian, is part of an original royal land division that extended from the waters off Pearl Harbor to the summit of the Waianae Mountains. The area was a sacred place used for rest and relaxat...
Ko Olina, Lanikuhonua, Alice Kamokila Campbell,
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Kualakaʻi Beach Fisherman
KualakaʻI Beach in Kalaeloa, Oʻahu.

Also known as White Plains Beach. A popular Ewa Beach surf spot known to have a wave like Canoes surf break in Waikiki. Kalaeloa literally means “long point” in Hawaiian, most likely receiving this name for its appearance from the Diamond Head end of Mamala Bay, from which it appears to be an extremely long point. Kalaeloa is the original name for Barber's Point, Oʻahu, where Captain Henry Barber went aground in 1796. In 2000, following the closure of BPNAS, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names approved the Redevelopment Commission's application to change the name of the area back to the traditional Hawaiian name Kalaeloa.


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Kualakaʻi Beach Fisherman, Kalaeloa, White Plains Beach.
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Koolina 4th Hawaiian Style
Ko'olina 4th Hawaiian Style by Chris Dacus Ko'olina 4th Hawaiian Style Fireworks light up the beach and sky.
Koolina, July 4th, Ko'olina, fireworks, Aulani
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Midsummer Night's Gleam
Foster Botanical Garden
Honolulu, Island of O'ahu, Hawai'i

Celebrating Midsummer Night's Gleam, Foster Botanical Garden was turned into a magical wonderland with 2,500 luminaries  sparkling along the pathways weaving through the garden.

The garden consists of the Upper Terrace (the oldest part of the garden); Middle Terraces (palms, aroids, heliconias, gingers); Economic Garden (herbs, spices, dyes, poisons); Prehistoric Glen (primitive plants planted in 1965); Lyon Orchid Garden; and Hybrid Orchid Display.

Foster Garden traces its beginning to 1853 when Queen Kalama leased a small area of land to William Hillebrand, a young German doctor. A botanist as well as a physician, he and his wife built a home in the upper terrace area of the present garden. 

In 1884, the Hillebrand property was sold to Thomas R. Foster and his wife Mary E. Foster, who continued to develop the garden at their homesite. Upon her death in 1930, Mary Foster bequeathed the land and her home to the City and County of Honolulu, with the provision that the city accept and forever keep and properly maintain the (gardens) as a public and tropical park to be known and called Foster Park. At the time, the gardens were roughly 5.5 acres.

Dr. Harold Lyon, the first director of Foster Garden, introduced thousands of new plants and trees to Hawaii, and started its famous orchid collection. Paul Weissich, director from 1957 to 1989, expanded Foster Garden to 14 acres.

The Garden is the inspiration for a line in Joni Mitchell's 1970 folk song "Big Yellow Taxi": "Took all the trees, put 'em in a tree museum / Then charge people a dollar and a half just to see 'em."

Foster was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

www.hawaiiunveiled.com
Foster Botanical Garden Midsummer Night's Gleam, July 18, 2015
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I'm a photographer and landscape architect that has been exploring the island of O'ahu for over 20 years.
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