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Chris Cartland
Works at Google
Attended University of California, Berkeley
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I think people are still finding codes for #googleio. Worth taking a look?
 
After browsing a lot of the Google documentation pages for the #io14  easter egg hunt I want to congratulate the +Google Chrome Developers (or +Google Developers?) to their fantastic #GoogleCast docs.

It's great to see each case described with screenshots and steps in between, always for #Android, #iOS  and #Web.

Thank you for putting this much work into it!
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Very nicely done.
 
After struggling with trying to figure out how various pieces fit together, I've done some research and put together the complete Android Activity/Fragment lifecycle chart. This has two parallel lifecycles (activities and fragments) which are organized vertically by time. Lifecycle stages will occur in the vertical order in which they're displayed, across activities and fragments. In this way, you can see how your fragments interact with your activities.

In addition to the attached image, I've also got an SVG: http://staticfree.info/~steve/complete_android_fragment_lifecycle.svg which is suitable for printing.

If this is missing lifecycle steps or is inaccurate in any way, let me know so I can update it!

#Android #androiddev  
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Chris Cartland

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Ready for Google I/O this year?
 
Design, Develop and Distribute at I/O 2014
#io   #io2014   #developers  

Whether you're a developer who's interested in the latest developments in the Googleverse or someone who wants to build the next billion dollar app, Google I/O is the ticket for you. The registration window will open at 4pm PDT today (April 15) and will remain open until April 18 at 2:00 PM PDT.
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Hey, game developers!  Check out the new LiquidFun EyeCandy demo (watch out!  It gives your GPU a workout!):

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wolff.EyeCandy

I also put up LiquidFun Testbed v1.0 so you can play with Sandbox, Sparky, and other great new testbed demos:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wolff.liquidfun.testbed2

Source for LiquidFun and more at:

http://google.github.io/liquidfun/
This is a published version of the EyeCandy sample from source found here:h...
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I love the explanation from the "creator". I bet we'll see a few of these soon :)
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For weeks I couldn't figure out how to enable Android developer settings on my Nexus 7. Finally, I found someone on the Internet with the same problem.

"Apparently only the tablet owner (first user created) has access to developer settings. I was using another user."

Good to know!
http://android.stackexchange.com/questions/60361/how-to-enable-developer-settings-nexus-7-4-4-2-kit-kat
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Action!
When we launched schema.org almost 3 years ago, our main focus was on providing vocabularies for describing entities --- people, places, movies, restaurants, ...  But the Web is not just about static descriptions of entities...
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Last December, we introduced +Post ads to a limited number of AdWords advertisers as a way to amplify their content to new audiences. Starting today, we’re making +Post ads available to all advertisers with at least 1000 Google+ followers: goo.gl/6gNlsx.

See how brands such as +Audi USA  and +Topman  are using +Post ads to drive more participation with their brand’s content across the web. 

#GooglePlusUpdate
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Chromecast: How to cast: http://youtu.be/5UWMQNgcMdg

Remember this also works on iPhone and iPad.
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The arguments are valid long before we invent Magic Boxes.
 
+Charlie Stross has a challenging and very interesting essay asking the question: Why should we work?

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2014/04/a-nation-of-slaves.html

We tend to talk around this issue a lot, but a key issue is this: as productivity (the amount of stuff of value we can create per hour of work) goes up, how much of that increase do we put in to increasing the amount of stuff of value we create, and how much do we put into decreasing the amount of work we do -- or put another way, what's the value of leisure?

Another way to look at this is to consider an extreme limit. Say that tomorrow, someone invented a couple of Magic Boxes. One of them lets you pour cheap raw materials (dirt, rocks) in one end, push a button, and anything you request, from a hamburger to a car, comes out the other end. Another one will answer any question you ask, organize anything you need organized, do research for you, synthesize the data, explain things to you, and so on. A third one will pick up any physical item and take it anywhere in the world you need to be. If it's not obvious, these magic boxes are just the limits of technology we already have.

Now in this post-Magic Box world, a lot of good things happen. For one thing, magic boxes themselves are cheap, because they can be made by magic boxes. (Someone will try to ban that, of course, and this will work about as well as banning people from humming songs) It's hard to go hungry when you can just dump dirt into your magic box and get a meal. Likewise, any clothing, shelter, and medicine you might need is just there, and another magic box can help you figure out which things will help you satisfy your needs. If you can afford the cheapest magic box, you can have the riches of Croesos.

On the other hand, you might notice that a huge fraction of all jobs in the world would cease to exist as well. Almost the entire manufacturing, service, logistics, or information sectors would cease to exist. Pretty much the only jobs remaining would be to come up with new designs to fit in to the magic boxes -- and it's not hard to imagine that magic boxes could do a lot of that, too. 

If we kept running the world the way we do now -- the way it would happen if someone literally invented these boxes tomorrow -- then we would find ourselves in a very strange state. Having successfully pushed productivity to infinity, and eliminated all possible cause for want in the world, almost everyone in the world would be suddenly unemployed, unable to access a magic box, and would starve to death.

This is obviously stupid.

The flaw in this, of course, is that our tendency to tie work to access to resources makes no sense in a world where the total amount of actual work to be done is much less than the total number of people around to do it. In this post-Box world, there simply aren't enough jobs for everyone.

That's not a bad thing for the basic reason that Stross explains. Most jobs aren't things you would want for their own sakes. Consider: If you suddenly inherited £100M, would you stay in your job? If you would -- if you would do this job even if it had nothing to do with earning money -- then your job is actually worth something to you in its own right, and you would probably keep doing it in a post-Box world. If, on the other hand, you would leave your job immediately, then your job has no value of its own to you: it exists only as a means to an end, and as soon as you have a better means, you're out of there.

The reason this is important is that we're already in the early days of the Magic Box Economy. When we see jobs disappearing around the world and not being replaced by new jobs -- entire trade sectors vanishing -- and the overall actual unemployment rate (not the rate of people looking for work, but the rate of people who aren't working for pay at all) rising, but at the same time overall global productivity is increasing, what we're seeing is that many of the jobs which used to be necessary for us as a species to survive are simply no longer needed. 

However, our economy, and our thinking about the economy, continues to be based on the idea that jobs are good, and working is good, and if you aren't trying to work harder, something must be wrong with you. Which means that, as people's jobs become completely obsoleted, with no useful "retraining" available since the total number of jobs has permanently gone down, we conclude that these people must therefore be drains on our society, and cut them off from the magic box, even though a surprisingly small amount of money is (in our semi-Box economy) already enough to survive.

What I've talked about above is the problem -- namely, how to manage the transition between a work-based economy and a magic box economy. There have been many solutions proposed to this, and I'm not going to go into all of them now. (For the record, I suspect that the "universal basic income" approach is probably the simplest and best solution, although my mind is by no means made up)

But it's come time to start thinking about this: As our wealth goes to infinity, how do we avoid starving to death?

(Image by ILO/Aaron Santos: https://flic.kr/p/hJVSyL)
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Have him in circles
4,250 people
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Work
Employment
  • Google
    Developer Advocate, 2014 - present
    Make awesome things with Google.
  • Google
    Developer Programs Engineer, 2012 - 2014
    Grow development around the world.
  • Google
    Associate Product Manager Intern, 2011 - 2011
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
December 2
Other names
Cartland
Story
Tagline
Let's do something awesome.
Introduction
I work with Developer Relations at Google. Our team brings the bleeding edge of technology to applications around the world.

Before Google you would have found me building solar cars in Berkeley and racing one across Australia.

And all of this started by playing with computers in Templeton. Small things lead to big changes.


*Disclaimer: Everything I say on Google+ come from my views and do not necessarily represent the views of my employer.
Bragging rights
http://calsol.berkeley.edu
Education
  • University of California, Berkeley
    EECS, 2008 - 2012
  • Templeton High School
    2004 - 2008
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