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Children’s Dental Land
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Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
Baby bottle tooth decay (also called early childhood caries, nursing caries, and nursing bottle syndrome) happens when a baby's teeth are in frequent contact with sugars from drinks, such as fruit juices, milk, formula, fruit juice diluted with water, sugar water, or any other sweet drink. If breastfed infants fall asleep with unswallowed milk in their mouth, they are also at risk for tooth decay. Bacteria in the mouth feed on the sugars, causing tooth decay.

If left untreated, decayed teeth can cause pain and make it difficult to chew and eat. Also, baby teeth serve as "space savers" for adult teeth. If baby teeth are damaged or destroyed, they can't help guide permanent teeth into their proper position, possibly resulting in crowded or crooked permanent teeth. Badly decayed baby teeth could lead to an abscessed tooth, with the possibility of infection spreading elsewhere in the body.

How Do I Prevent Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?
Some tips to prevent baby bottle tooth decay include:


During the day, to calm or comfort your baby, don't give a bottle filled with sugary drinks or milk; instead, give plain water or a pacifier.
Never dip your baby's pacifier in sugar, honey, or any sugary liquid.
Don't put your baby to bed with a bottle filled with sugary drinks (watered-down fruit juice or milk still increases the risk of decay). Give a small amount of plain water or use a pacifier instead. Too much water is harmful to a baby.
If your baby is nursing at night, make sure you remove your breast from your baby's mouth when she falls asleep.
Don't add sugar to your baby's food.
Use a wet cloth or gauze to wipe your baby's teeth and gums after each feeding. This helps remove any bacteria-forming plaque and sugar that have built up on the teeth and gums.
Ask your dentist about your baby's fluoride needs. If your drinking water is not fluoridated, fluoride supplements or fluoride treatments may be needed.
Teach your baby to drink from a cup by his or her first birthday. Moving to a "sippy cup" lowers the teeth's exposure to sugars, but constant sipping from the cup can still result in decay unless it is filled with plain water.
#babybottle #kids #arizona #dentist #pediatric #mesa

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Have you ever run your tongue along the front of your teeth and felt a slimy coating? That “fuzzy-toothed” feeling is the buildup of bacteria.

It’s called plaque, and if you let it stick around for too long, it can damage your teeth and gums.

What can you do to stop plaque in its tracks? We've got answers for you.

Step 1: Brush Every Day

Once a day is good, but the American Dental Association (ADA) says to brush twice a day. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush and a fluoride toothpaste.

“Brushing twice daily prevents plaque from forming in the first place and disrupts any plaque that has already started to form and mature,” says JoAnn R. Gurenlian, PhD. She's a professor in the department of dental hygiene at Idaho State University.

Make sure you get to all the areas of your mouth with your toothbrush, including teeth, gums, tongue, and the insides of your cheeks. In general, the process should take about 2 minutes.

Step 2: Clean Between Your Teeth

There may not be much of a fun factor to flossing, but cleaning between your teeth every day can have a crucial impact on your oral health.

If you have a tough time reaching certain parts of your mouth to floss, ask your dentist about interdental brushes, floss aides, or water- or air-flossing devices.

Step 3: Use a Mouth Rinse

Know your terms: mouth rinse and mouthwash are two different things. “Mouthwash is used to freshen breath,” Gurenlian says. “An antiseptic mouth rinse, however, actually helps reduce the bacterial load found in plaque.”

Using mouth rinse prevents plaque buildup more than just brushing and flossing alone. Gurenlian suggests a 30-second swish twice each day as part of your tooth-cleaning routine.

Step 4: Avoid Sticky, Sugary Food

The hardest foods to remove from your teeth are the ones that cling when you chew. Think raisins, granola bars, or sticky candy. Sugary and starchy foods are some of the most harmful to teeth, too.

“If sugar is not removed from your teeth shortly after you eat it, plaque uses it to help create tooth decay,” Gurenlian says. The faster you can get food off your teeth, the less likely you are to get cavities.

Step 5: Go to the Dentist

It’s key to have someone who knows teeth keep tabs on yours. See your dentist and dental hygienist on a regular basis, so they can look for signs of disease.

How often you have to go will depend in part on how well you care for your teeth. Most people have to visit only twice a year.

Request an appointment with us today:
http://goo.gl/Lf0qYd #plaque #tooth #phoenixaz #kids
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