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Cheetham's Pharmacy
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Summertime Fun – Fact versus Fiction about Sunscreen and Mosquito Repellent. Summer, it is one of my favorite times of the year. There is nothing better than enjoying the sun, sand, ice cream or a marsh mellow roast with family and friends. Those pesky mosquitos and painful sunburns, however, can put a halt to all that summer fun. To make this season the most enjoyable one yet, let’s debunk some common misconceptions about sunscreen and mosquito repellent.

Everyone loves to be out enjoying the warmth of the sun whether it’s at the lake, your own backyard or on a tropical island far away. The important thing to remember is to arm yourself the proper knowledge to keep you and your loved ones protected from the damaging effects of UVA and UVB rays. Here are a list of some common sunscreen myths:

1. Myth - Sunscreen is not required on cloudy days. Fact – Clouds only block approximately 20% of UV rays therefore you can still get a burn on cloudy days.
2. Myth – I do not need to wear a sunscreen if I have a darker skin tone. Fact – People with a darker skin tone may be less likely to burn but they still can. It is recommended that everyone regardless of colour wear a sunscreen that provides broad spectrum protection against the damaging effects of UVA and UVB rays.
3. Myth – Sunscreen is not required for those who work inside. Fact – Any exposure to sunlight through an office, car or plane window requires protection.
4. Myth – SPF refers to the number of minutes that a person will receive sun protection while outside. Fact – Not exactly. Sun Protection Factor (SPF) refers to the amount of UV radiation required to produce a sunburn on protected skin versus unprotected skin. The math is simple SPF 30 means only 1/30 of harmful UVB rays will reach your skin while the remaining 29/30 blocks 97% of the UVB radiation.
5. Myth – Sunscreen needs to only be applied once because its protection lasts all day. Fact – Sunscreen must be reapplied frequently throughout the day. Make a routine of applying it every 2 hours while outside and even more frequently when enjoying water activities.
6. Myth – Sunscreen provides protection the minute after it’s applied. Fact – Sunscreen takes approximately 15-20 minutes to bind to the skin and should be applied well in advance to sun exposure.

Debunking some of these common myths should make the summer very enjoyable for everyone. Here are a few tips to prevent damage from the UV rays: apply sunscreen often, use a broad spectrum sunscreen that provides UVA and UVB protection, apply sunscreen everywhere including the tips of the ears where the skin is thin and burns easily, wear a wide brimmed hat, sit under some shade such as an umbrella, protect your eyes with sunglasses and your lips with a chap stick that has SPF protection and lastly, keep yourself hydrated.

Now, that we have the daytime covered it’s time to focus on campfires and marsh mellow roasts in the evening. These enjoyable events can be disrupted by those annoying mosquitos, so let’s talk about some common misconceptions regarding mosquito repellant so that summer nights can be just as enjoyable as summer days. Here is a list of a few common myths:

1. Myth – Foods that have a higher sodium content or potassium content such as bananas increase your attraction to mosquitos. Fact – A hungry mosquito does not care about the content of your food or drink consumption.
2. Myth – The higher the percentage of DEET in a product, the better the protection. Fact – The percentage of DEET determines how long protection may last. For example, a product that contains 30 percent DEET provides 5 to 8 hours of protection whereas 10 percent DEET lasts about 2.5 to 4 hours.
3. Myth – DEET is dangerous, natural products are better. Fact – DEET is the most effective repellent and safe when applied properly. Some natural products such as citronella or eucalyptus oil may need to be applied 3 or 4 times more often than the lowest strength of DEET in order to provide some protection.
4. Myth – Mosquito Repellent and Sunscreen can be applied at the same time. Fact – Sunscreen should be applied 15-20 minutes prior to applying mosquito repellant. This time is needed to ensure the sunscreen binds to the skin and provides proper protection.

In short, summer does not need to be ruined by nasty sunburns or pesky mosquitos. Taking the time to apply sunscreen and mosquito repellant properly to anyone over the age of 6 months will allow for a lot of good times this summer. A few guidelines to follow for mosquito repellant are: apply products containing 10% DEET once daily for children 6 months to 2 years and children 2-12 years can use a product with 10% DEET up to three times a day. Remember the expert pharmacists at Cheetham’s Pharmacy are here to provide advice and guidance on sunscreen and mosquito repellant for you and your family. Do not hesitate to ask if your medication or medical condition can increase your sensitivity to the sun, as many prescription medication can. Make this summer the most enjoyable one yet!

www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

Cheetham's Pharmacy
514 Queen St, Saskatoon,
S7K 0M5
306-653-5112

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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Poison Ivy - Just the thought of it can cause shivers up our spine. All too often someone running into this unpleasant plant can sour our fun camping days. Poison ivy is probably responsible for more cases of plant dermatitis in Canada than any other plant, however most people aren’t aware of what it looks like, let alone what to do if you run into it.

Prevent a rash from poison ivy:
There are two ways to prevent a rash:
1. Avoid these poisonous plants.
2. Protect your skin.

What poison ivy looks like?
Each leaf has 3 small leaflets.
It grows as a shrub (low woody plant)
In spring, it grows yellow-green flowers.

It may have green berries that turn off-white in early fall.

How to protect your skin from poison ivy:
Sometimes you cannot avoid these plants. When you find yourself in this situation, there are some precautions you can take:
1. Use a skin-care product called an ivy block barrier. This helps prevent the skin from absorbing the oil, which causes the rash. Be sure to apply the block before going outdoors.

2. Wear long pants, long sleeves, boots, and gloves. Even when you apply an ivy block barrier you need to cover your skin with clothing.

A rash from poison ivy is caused by an oil found in these plants called urushiol (you-ROO-shee-all). When this oil touches your skin, it often causes an itchy, blistering rash.

Most people can safely treat the rash at home:
1. Immediately rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water - If not washed off, the oil can spread from person to person and to other areas of your body.

2. Wash your clothing - Thoroughly wash all of the clothes you were wearing when you came into contact with the poisonous plant. The oil can stick to clothing, and if it touches your skin, it can cause another rash.

3. Wash everything that may have the oil on its surface - Besides clothing, the oil from poison ivy can stick to many surfaces, including gardening tools, golf clubs, leashes and even a pet’s fur. Be sure to rinse your pet’s fur, and wash tools and other objects with warm, soapy water.

4. Do not scratch, as scratching can cause an infection.

5. Leave blisters alone - If blisters open, do not remove the overlying skin, as the skin can protect the raw wound underneath and prevent infection.

6. Take short, lukewarm baths - To ease the itch, take short, lukewarm baths containing an oatmeal based product.

7. Consider calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream.

8. Apply cool compresses to the itchy skin.

9. Consider taking antihistamine pills - These pills can help reduce itching, however, you should not apply an antihistamine cream to your skin, as doing so can worsen the rash and the itch.

If you experience any of the following symptoms, go to the emergency room right away:
1. You have trouble breathing or swallowing.
2. The rash covers most of your body.
3. You have many rashes or blisters.
4. You experience swelling, especially if an eyelid swells shut.
5. The rash develops anywhere on your face or genitals.
6. Much of your skin itches, or nothing seems to ease the itch.

Prevention is key, so get to know this plant. "Leaflets three, let it be" is a good reminder of what poison ivy looks like. And don’t forget to ask your pharmacist what products you can keep in your first aid kit to help if you ever do need to treat a poison ivy rash.
​Cheetham’s Pharmacy, more than a pharmacy, bringing our special care to you.

306-653-5111

Email us at: pharmacy@shaw.ca
Visit us online at www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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Staying Safe in the Sun

Saskatoon is one of the sunniest cities across Canada, and as temperatures rise with summer approaching it is quite appropriate to discuss sun safety. Below is a list of sun safe practices to help everyone have fun and stay safe during the summer.

1. Check the UV index daily. The UV index is important as it tells you the strength of the sun’s daily UV rays. Higher numbers indicate stronger sunrays, and exposures that are moderate or greater need greater precautions when outside. The sunlight in Canada is strong enough to cause skin cancer, and this is why it is so important that we all apply sun safe practices to our everyday lives.

UV Index

Exposure

0 – 2 Low

3 – 5 Moderate

6 – 7 High

8 – 10 Very high

11+ Extreme

2. Limit your time in the sun. The UV rays from the sun are strongest between the hours of 10:00am and 4:00pm. Everyone should do their best to limit the amount of time they spend in the sun during these hours, as skin is more easily burned.

3. Seek shade. This is extra important during the times at which the sun’s rays are the strongest, to help limit exposure and prevent burns.

4. Cover up. Tightly woven, and loosely fitting clothing is best to wear as it can provide additional protection from the sun. It is also important to be wearing a hat when outdoors. Your best choice is a wide brimmed hat, as it will protect your eyes, ears, face, and the back of your neck from the sun.

5. Wearing sunglasses. The sun can damage your eyes, and the best way to protect them is to wear sunglasses that provide 99-100% protection from both UVA and UVB radiation.

6. Properly use sunscreen. It is recommended that everyone use a broad-spectrum sunscreen of at least SPF 15 or 30. Broad-spectrum sunscreens are important because they will protect against both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. UVA rays make up most of the sun’s natural light and can penetrate deep into the skin to cause wrinkles and premature aging whereas UVB rays are the main cause of sunburns. SPF in sunscreen is the sun protection factor and measures the ability to protect your skin from UVB radiation. However, higher SPF is not always better. Sunscreens do not provide 100% protection no matter how high the SPF is, and therefore any SPF greater than 30 does not provide much added benefit. Sunscreens should be applied 20-30 minutes prior to sun exposure and reapplied generously every 2 hours or after drying off from swimming or sweating.

7. Avoid indoor tanning beds. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation does not only come from the sun but also indoor tanning equipment such as tanning beds and sun lamps. These are not to be considered safe alternatives as any amount of UV exposure has inherent risks. Some of these risks include, but are not limited to sunburn, heat stroke and skin cancer. Skin cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer, but also considered one of the most preventable if sun safe practices are utilized.

8. Know the signs of skin cancer. Regularly checking your skin for any new growth or change can help with early detection of skin cancer. And most skin cancers, if caught early enough, can be cured.

​Cheetham’s Pharmacy, more than a pharmacy, bringing our special care to you.

www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

Cheetham’s Pharmacy
514 Queen St
Saskatoon, SK, S7K 0M5
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For All Seniors
- Medication Reviews
- Senior's discount on select OTC products
- Smoking Cessation Program
- Compression Sock Measuring
- Vaccinations

For Existing Cheetham’s Pharmacy Clients
- Medication Bubble-Packing & Pill Splitting
- Free Round-trip Shuttle to Cheetham's Pharmacy and/or Physician's Office
- Free basic foot care from a certified esthetician
- Home Pharmacist Visits
- Blood Pressure Monitoring
- Medication Delivery & Mailing
- On call pharmacist accessible on weekends and evenings

Care Home Clients
Cheetham’s care home clients will receive the best pharmaceutical care possible. Each of our care homes is assigned a pharmacist, who makes in-home visits to patients and provides in-services to staff members about diseases and medications. Additionally, all of our regular services are offered to our care home clients. Medications are delivered either on a weekly or monthly basis depending on client preference. The Cheetham’s Pharmacy Team goes above and beyond to ensure that care-home staff, patients, and family members feel comfortable with health related matters and concerns. For more information, contact our pharmacy team!

306-653-5111

Email us at: pharmacy@shaw.ca
Visit us online at www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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Supporting someone with depression

Chances are you know someone who is struggling with a mental illness because 20% of Canadians will personally experience a mental illness in their lifetime. Around 8% of adults will experience a major depression at some time in their lives. You want to help your loved one as best you can but it's hard when you can't see where they are hurt. Here are some things you can say and do to support someone with depression.

Validate their condition. When their pain and symptoms are mostly invisible people tend not to believe them. We still don't know exactly why people get depression, we know that there are imbalances with transmitters in the brain but this doesn't explain why some medications work for some people and why they don't help the next person at all. We know that their pain is real and they didn't choose it.

Do not tell them to think positively, they have tried that already. It is like telling someone with diabetes to think positively to make their blood sugars go down. Often someone living with depression lose friends when they can't think positively. Do not shame them for being negative as this will only make them feel even more guilt; depression makes it easier to experience anger, frustration and guilt. When they experience gratitude and positivity it feels like pretending to them. You may try deflecting the conversation to nicer things in their day, if that doesn’t work focus on what you want out of the conversation, instead of making it about them. Encourage them to talk to you about their diagnosis and what they are feeling when they are ready.

Do help them to adhere to their medications when you can. It’s important to remind them that it takes 4-6 weeks to see any changes IF the right medication was selected. It’s a game of trial and error and they need to be reminded to take it even when it feels like it’s doing anything. Close to half of patients stop taking their antidepressants within four months without discussion with their doctor. For many medications, it’s important to taper off slowly or you can get withdrawal symptoms (even if there wasn’t a noticeable change).

There are many reasons why people stop taking antidepressants and the first step is to find out why. If it’s because of side effects encourage them to see their pharmacist, many of these side effects are transient and go away once their body gets used to the medication. Also let their pharmacist know they are struggling with adherence. We can work with your loved one to educate more on their condition and how the medication works, to make the pills up into blister packs to help keep them on track and work with scheduling around other medications, work or school. If cost is an issue let the pharmacist know and we can do our best to find the lowest cost of the drug.

Lastly encourage them to keep a journal of their journey with mental illness. Tell them to write down how they feel, any changes in mood, when they start and stop taking medications. This can be important later as the person will most likely have to try a few different medications before they find one that works.

Call us or contact us for details:
306-653-5111

Email us at: pharmacy@shaw.ca
Visit us online at www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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Supporting someone with depression

Chances are you know someone who is struggling with a mental illness because 20% of Canadians will personally experience a mental illness in their lifetime. Around 8% of adults will experience a major depression at some time in their lives. You want to help your loved one as best you can but it's hard when you can't see where they are hurt. Here are some things you can say and do to support someone with depression.

Validate their condition. When their pain and symptoms are mostly invisible people tend not to believe them. We still don't know exactly why people get depression, we know that there are imbalances with transmitters in the brain but this doesn't explain why some medications work for some people and why they don't help the next person at all. We know that their pain is real and they didn't choose it.

Do not tell them to think positively, they have tried that already. It is like telling someone with diabetes to think positively to make their blood sugars go down. Often someone living with depression lose friends when they can't think positively. Do not shame them for being negative as this will only make them feel even more guilt; depression makes it easier to experience anger, frustration and guilt. When they experience gratitude and positivity it feels like pretending to them. You may try deflecting the conversation to nicer things in their day, if that doesn’t work focus on what you want out of the conversation, instead of making it about them. Encourage them to talk to you about their diagnosis and what they are feeling when they are ready.

Do help them to adhere to their medications when you can. It’s important to remind them that it takes 4-6 weeks to see any changes IF the right medication was selected. It’s a game of trial and error and they need to be reminded to take it even when it feels like it’s doing anything. Close to half of patients stop taking their antidepressants within four months without discussion with their doctor. For many medications, it’s important to taper off slowly or you can get withdrawal symptoms (even if there wasn’t a noticeable change).

There are many reasons why people stop taking antidepressants and the first step is to find out why. If it’s because of side effects encourage them to see their pharmacist, many of these side effects are transient and go away once their body gets used to the medication. Also let their pharmacist know they are struggling with adherence. We can work with your loved one to educate more on their condition and how the medication works, to make the pills up into blister packs to help keep them on track and work with scheduling around other medications, work or school. If cost is an issue let the pharmacist know and we can do our best to find the lowest cost of the drug.

Lastly encourage them to keep a journal of their journey with mental illness. Tell them to write down how they feel, any changes in mood, when they start and stop taking medications. This can be important later as the person will most likely have to try a few different medications before they find one that works.

Call us or contact us for details:
306-653-5111

Email us at: pharmacy@shaw.ca
Visit us online at www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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Celebrating Nursing - Happy National Nurses week!!

We appreciate all the contributions nurses make to society.
https://www.cna-aiic.ca/en/events/national-nursing-week
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Pharmacists in Saskatchewan can now prescribe birth control and UTI medication

For women in Saskatchewan, accessing birth control is getting easier as pharmacists in the province are now able to prescribe hormonal contraceptives.

While this doesn’t include IUD’s (intrauterine device), it does include oral, transdermal (patch) or vaginal ring hormonal contraception.

In 2011 the province changed its rules and regulations to allow for pharmacists to prescribe for minor medical conditions such as diaper rash and emergency contraception.

“With respect to a pharmacists ability to assess, it really is no different than other health care professionals,” the director of professional practice at the Pharmacy Association of Saskatchewan, Myla Wollbaum, said.

While there are certain health conditions that might cause a pharmacist to refer a patient to their physician, for the most part, the process is quite simple.

A person can walk up to the counter at their local drug store and ask to speak with a pharmacist about a prescription, with no appointment necessary.

“It just allows them greater access to health care in Saskatchewan,” Wollbaum said. “Many pharmacies have extended hours of operation so right there is increased access just because of hours.”

It also allows greater access to contraception for women living in rural and remote areas where there might not be access to a doctor.

The change is welcomed news for Regina’s Planned Parenthood who said over the years, demand for their services has increased.

“Timeliness is important and sometimes the wait list to get in to see your primary health provider can be quite extensive,” executive director for Planned Parenthood, Shelley Svedahl, said. “So the more that are part of this process, [the more] we can increase the availability of contraception.”

The recent changes also allow pharmacists to prescribe antibiotics for urinary tract infections.

However, patients must have been previously diagnosed by a physician or nurse practitioner in the past.

More prescribing power is being discussed and in the next six months, pharmacists will gain the ability to prescribe for erectile dysfunction, obesity and smoking cessation.

Read more and watch the clip on Global

https://globalnews.ca/news/4118878/pharmacists-in-saskatchewan-can-now-prescribe-birth-control-and-uti-medication/

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions

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Warmer Weather– Fact versus Fiction about Sunscreen and Mosquito Repellent

There is nothing better than enjoying the sun, sand, ice cream or a marsh mellow roast with family and friends. Those pesky mosquitos and painful sunburns, however, can put a halt to all that summer fun. To make this season the most enjoyable one yet, let’s debunk some common misconceptions about sunscreen and mosquito repellent.

Everyone loves to be out enjoying the warmth of the sun whether it’s at the lake, your own backyard or on a tropical island far away. The important thing to remember is to arm yourself the proper knowledge to keep you and your loved ones protected from the damaging effects of UVA and UVB rays. Here are a list of some common sunscreen myths:

1. Myth - Sunscreen is not required on cloudy days. Fact – Clouds only block approximately 20% of UV rays therefore you can still get a burn on cloudy days.
2. Myth – I do not need to wear a sunscreen if I have a darker skin tone. Fact – People with a darker skin tone may be less likely to burn but they still can. It is recommended that everyone regardless of colour wear a sunscreen that provides broad spectrum protection against the damaging effects of UVA and UVB rays.
3. Myth – Sunscreen is not required for those who work inside. Fact – Any exposure to sunlight through an office, car or plane window requires protection.
4. Myth – SPF refers to the number of minutes that a person will receive sun protection while outside. Fact – Not exactly. Sun Protection Factor (SPF) refers to the amount of UV radiation required to produce a sunburn on protected skin versus unprotected skin. The math is simple SPF 30 means only 1/30 of harmful UVB rays will reach your skin while the remaining 29/30 blocks 97% of the UVB radiation.
5. Myth – Sunscreen needs to only be applied once because its protection lasts all day. Fact – Sunscreen must be reapplied frequently throughout the day. Make a routine of applying it every 2 hours while outside and even more frequently when enjoying water activities.
6. Myth – Sunscreen provides protection the minute after it’s applied. Fact – Sunscreen takes approximately 15-20 minutes to bind to the skin and should be applied well in advance to sun exposure.

Debunking some of these common myths should make the summer very enjoyable for everyone. Here are a few tips to prevent damage from the UV rays: apply sunscreen often, use a broad spectrum sunscreen that provides UVA and UVB protection, apply sunscreen everywhere including the tips of the ears where the skin is thin and burns easily, wear a wide brimmed hat, sit under some shade such as an umbrella, protect your eyes with sunglasses and your lips with a chap stick that has SPF protection and lastly, keep yourself hydrated.

Now, that we have the daytime covered it’s time to focus on campfires and marsh mellow roasts in the evening. These enjoyable events can be disrupted by those annoying mosquitos, so let’s talk about some common misconceptions regarding mosquito repellant so that summer nights can be just as enjoyable as summer days. Here is a list of a few common myths:

1. Myth – Foods that have a higher sodium content or potassium content such as bananas increase your attraction to mosquitos. Fact – A hungry mosquito does not care about the content of your food or drink consumption.
2. Myth – The higher the percentage of DEET in a product, the better the protection. Fact – The percentage of DEET determines how long protection may last. For example, a product that contains 30 percent DEET provides 5 to 8 hours of protection whereas 10 percent DEET lasts about 2.5 to 4 hours.
3. Myth – DEET is dangerous, natural products are better. Fact – DEET is the most effective repellent and safe when applied properly. Some natural products such as citronella or eucalyptus oil may need to be applied 3 or 4 times more often than the lowest strength of DEET in order to provide some protection.
4. Myth – Mosquito Repellent and Sunscreen can be applied at the same time. Fact – Sunscreen should be applied 15-20 minutes prior to applying mosquito repellant. This time is needed to ensure the sunscreen binds to the skin and provides proper protection.

In short, summer does not need to be ruined by nasty sunburns or pesky mosquitos. Taking the time to apply sunscreen and mosquito repellant properly to anyone over the age of 6 months will allow for a lot of good times this summer. A few guidelines to follow for mosquito repellant are: apply products containing 10% DEET once daily for children 6 months to 2 years and children 2-12 years can use a product with 10% DEET up to three times a day. Remember the expert pharmacists at Cheetham’s Pharmacy are here to provide advice and guidance on sunscreen and mosquito repellant for you and your family. Do not hesitate to ask if your medication or medical condition can increase your sensitivity to the sun, as many prescription medication can. Make this summer the most enjoyable one yet!

Email us at: pharmacy@shaw.ca
Visit us online at www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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Minor Ailment Prescribing

Did you know our pharmacists are qualified to prescribe for certain conditions?

Mild to Moderate Acne​
Allergic Rhinitis
Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)
Cold Sores
Diaper Rash
Menstrual Cramps
Heartburn
Hemorrhoids
Insect bites
Strains and Sprains
Certain Skin infections (Ringworm, Jock itch, Athletes Foot)
Canker Sores
​Headaches

At Cheetham's Pharmacy, patient overall health and satisfaction is our main priority. With our extensive pharmaceutical knowledge, our team is dedicated to providing the best possible health care while building strong relationships with our patients.

As pharmacy knowledge evolves, Cheetham's Pharmacy continues to be informed about upcoming healthcare services and new therapy.

Email us at: pharmacy@shaw.ca
Visit us online at www.cheethamspharmacy.ca

#Saskatoon #wellness #yxe #pharmacy #healthyliving #FluShot #Flu #Colds #prevention #CheethamsPharmacy #5Rs #Care #Carehome #Seniors #Personal #PersonalCare #Prescriptions
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