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Cell Sciences Inc.
2,131 followers -
Experiment, Discover, Understand.
Experiment, Discover, Understand.

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Seen here is an x-ray of a developing bat embryo. A substance called Alcian blue staining is used to get a better view of its cartilage and bones.
 
Image: Rodrigo G. Arzate-Mejia, Marina Venero Galanternik, William Munoz, Jennifer McKey
Found on Science Alert: https://www.facebook.com/ScienceAlert?fref=photo
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The film covering this tree frog’s eye is called a nictating membrane. It extends from the lower eyelid. This membrane keeps the frog’s eyes moist while he’s asleep, while also letting in light, allowing him to detect predators while sleeping.
 
Photos via The Featured Creature on FB, credited: Heidi and Hans-Jürgen Koch, erezmarom on Deviantart
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2014-12-08
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If you click on #seemoremicro  you can see a collection of tiny beauties that have been posted to our page!
What is this beautiful substance? It's vitamin C under the microscope. Photomicrographers Spike Walker and David Maitland showcase the hidden beauty of vitamin C in these incredible images.

see more here: http://goo.gl/X77qcL
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Elements by color

See this and other great chemical reactions here : http://goo.gl/jClyJL
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New test could give smokers early warning of lung cancer.

Scientists from the University College London have discovered that the way light reacts with human cells may indicate the likelihood of a person having lung cancer. Patients with lung tumours were found to have subtle abnormalities in the cells of their mouth, lungs and nose. Using swabs from patients’ cheeks, researchers found that cells of lung cancer patients reflected and refracted light slightly differently to those who did not have the disease.

http://goo.gl/ohDhSS
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Researchers have found the brain networks that give humans superior reasoning skills.

UC Berkeley scientists have found evidence that helps explain why humans excel at “relational reasoning”, a cognitive skill that allows us to discern patterns and relationships to make sense of seemingly unrelated information, such as problem solving in unfamiliar circumstances. A good example of relational reasoning occurred when the Apollo 13 crew improvised to create a chemical filter on a lunar module to prevent carbon dioxide buildup that would have killed the crew.

The key to our superior reasoning skills, scientists found, lies in small changes in the frontal and parietal lobes. The team discovered these changes by using an array of neuroimaging, neuroanatomical and cognitive methods to compare the brains of many different species. The report, published in Neuron, states that three specific areas seem to be responsible for humans’ exceptional reasoning abilities: the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the inferior parietal lobule.

Read more from NeuroScientistNews: http://goo.gl/9Yit8r
Image: Lobes of Brain, Wikispaces.com
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World’s first artificial enzymes suggest DNA and RNA are not necessary for life.

Scientists have constructed artificial enzymes using lab-grown genetic material called XNA. This experiment promotes the idea that life could evolve without what we thought to be the fundamental building blocks of life- DNA and RNA.

Scientists created these artificial enzymes from scratch, using genetic material created in the lab. These enzymes contain XNA- xeno nucleic acid. These nucleic acids could be used to find new medical treatments and even find life on other planets.

"Our work with XNA shows that there's no fundamental imperative for RNA and DNA to be prerequisites for life,” one of the researchers, Philipp Holliger from the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, told Andy Coghlan at New Scientist.

Read more: http://goo.gl/hlIZz2

Image: DNA, Wikipedia
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Diatoms are a group of algea, and are among of the most common types of phytoplankton.

Most diatoms are single celled, but they can exist as colonies in many exciting shapes.
Klaus Kemp has devoted his life to understanding and perfecting diatom arrangement, where diatoms are arranged carefully into beautiful patterns. He is acknowledged as the last great practicioner of this beautiful marriage of art and science. Watch The Diatomist to see his incredible work.
http://vimeo.com/90160649
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