One reason to go to an education conference is to have one's belief in the blindingly obvious confirmed. This paper, presented at SIGCSE 2016, concludes with: "In this paper, we have found evidence that programming ability is hierarchical, and goes beyond what can be as-
sessed by a multiple choice test."

Hear, hear. I taught CS1 many times without a single multiple-choice question on an exam, much to the chagrin of the students. After all, it's loops and array and functions that matter, and a pretty good way to test those topics is to make students trace code, fix code, or write code. 

And when teaching CS2, many students joined the class who had learned to excel in multiple-choice questions in CS1, with a limited ability to write code. Many of them caught on and wrote in their evaluations something like "assignments much more reasonable towards the end of the semester", but unfortunately others didn't in time--"assumes super-human powers from students".

Another paper in the same conference proposed a multiple-choice test for assessing a "concept inventory" of programming knowledge. I went to the presentation, and it didn't pass the smoke test for me. I wish I had read the other paper first so that I could have raised my hand and said "Aren't you aware that there is evidence that programming ability is hierarchical, and goes beyond what can be assessed by a multiple choice test?"
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