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Cay Horstmann
1,692 followers -
In my copious spare time, I write about programming languages and computer science education.
In my copious spare time, I write about programming languages and computer science education.

1,692 followers
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A few days ago I happened to notice that Project Amber is busy working on the syntax and semantics of switch expressions. You can write something like:

int numLetters = switch (day) {
case MONDAY, FRIDAY, SUNDAY -> 6;
case TUESDAY -> 7;
case THURSDAY, SATURDAY -> 8;
case WEDNESDAY: logger.info("It's Wednesday"); break 9;
};

I was all on board until I saw "break 9".

I mean, I write books and teach courses, and I actually have some idea what is difficult for readers and students. The switch statement is a dumpster fire, and break is no picnic either. Adding a new wrinkle to break seems like a really poor idea.

Not being a member of the spec group, I posted on the dev group and was sternly admonished to stop the bikeshedding.

I wrote up a short article at http://horstmann.com/unblog/2018-04-23/index.html and invite all bikeshedders to join the discussion.
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So, our government decided that Internet users don't have the most basic right to privacy, and that the utilities that provide Internet access can spy on their customers and sell whatever information they glean to the highest bidder. What's next? Can your electricity company meter what you use the stuff for and sell that? Can your car vendor harvest where you drive? I am fortunate to have an internet provider who is in the business of providing Internet access, and not in the peeping-Tom business. They hate it too (https://corp.sonic.net/ceo/2017/03/29/privacy-matters/). But that's just random fortune--most people have the choice between their phone company and their cable company. Good luck.

And for what gain? It is basic human dignity to be able to read or listen or watch what we want, without anyone sticking their nose into it. What does it say about our government? Are targeted ads more important than "We, the People"?

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