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Catering Hygiene Specialists Ltd
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Flyscreen Windows & Doors - The Legislation

The main food hygiene laws in the UK are the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 (and equivalent regulations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) and Regulation (EC) No. 852/2004 on the Hygiene of Foodstuffs. The 2006 law is based on EU legislation that incorporates many points from previous UK food hygiene and safety acts

It is a legal requirement for businesses to implement a food hygiene plan based on HACCP principles. Flyscreens are a legal requirement where windows and doors open to the outside
Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29th April 2004 of the Hygiene of Foodstuffs states:

“Premises and vending machines are, so far as is reasonably practicable, to be sited, designed, constructed and kept clean and maintained in good repair and condition as to avoid the risk of contamination, in particular by animals and pests.” (Annex II Food premises: Chapter III: point 1)

“Adequate procedures are to be in place to control pests.” (Annex II Food premises: Chapter IX: point 4) “Those windows which can be opened to the outside environment are, where necessary, to be fitted with insect-proof screens which can be easily removed for cleaning.” (Annex II Food premises: Chapter II: point 1(D)) HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) All food businesses must put in place ‘food safety management procedures’ based on the principles of HACCP.HACCP helps businesses to put procedures in place to control hazards

Businesses must consider the control of pests in their HACCP plan, and maintenance records of any equipment (including fly killers) will become part of the plan

If a pest control company is employed to monitor the premises on a regular basis, their reports should be kept as part of HACCP documentation

The Food Standards Agency provide further information on food hygiene regulation and good practice - www.food.gov.uk

Should restaurant hygiene ratings be mandatory?
5 January 2014 Last updated at 17:21 GMT
Inside Out investigates London restaurants and food outlets which fall below standard on food hygiene ratings.
From Michelin-star restaurants to local cafes, reporter Mark Jordan joins the food inspectors as they track down some of London's dirtiest kitchens.
Restaurants are given a 0-5 rating based on their food preparation and hygiene standards, with five being the maximum.
But the present system has one flaw - restaurants and food outlets are not obliged to display their ratings.
Jenny Morris, from the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health, which helped introduce the scheme, believes putting ratings on the doors of eateries should be mandatory, as it is in Wales.
Food hygiene inspector Pip Broad, from Waltham Forest, also believes mandatory display of the ratings would help drive up food hygiene standards across the UK.
Inside Out is broadcast on Monday, 6 January at 19:30 GMT on BBC One London and nationwide for seven days thereafter on the iPlayer.

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Almost a quarter of the 24,000 accidental fires in non domestic buildings each year are attributed to cooking appliances, and in the last decade fires in grease extract ducts linked to catering facilities have caused considerable damage at Witney town centre, Heathrow Airport, South Mimms services and more recently the Hard Rock Café in London.
Building managers are rightly concerned about a visit from the Health & Safety Executive (HSE), but you might be surprised how sympathetic they will be if you can show evidence, including paper trails, that you have at least taken steps to address and monitor ventilation hygiene issues.
The potential risks associated with kitchen extract ventilation systems are now well documented. They will draw grease laden air directly from the areas above cookers, grills and fryers via the cooker hood and out to the atmosphere.  The filters usually found above the fryers are designed to trap grease particles, but they can never be 100% efficient and a significant number of these grease particles will pass through into the extract system.
This allows a potentially flammable coating to form on the inside of the canopy/extract plenum (the void behind the grease filters) in the extract ductwork and on the fan blades.  These grease deposits are easily ignited by even a small flash fire on or in the fryer, hob or grill and flames and heat can then quickly spread through the building.

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Founded in 1993 and initially offering its services throughout South East England CHS has expanded its expertise nationwide. From our Head Office near London, we have a fleet of vehicles and teams of specialist staff strategically positioned throughout the UK offering full ventilation ducting cleaning,kitchen deep cleaning services and installation of fly screens. Services can be tailored to suit the caterer from one-off cleans to more frequent cleaning schedules.

With a vast portfolio of customers we still manage to offer a friendly, efficient service normally associated with a smaller enterprise. CHS has worked hard to retain its reputation with national chains of retailers, restaurants, hotels and local authority premises through to privately owned golf clubs and public houses all benefiting from our expertise and professionalism.

As the business has evolved it has an increasing focus on legislation, fire risk and health and safety. CHS has gained certification and accreditation with relevant bodies and associations thereby ensuring our cleaning procedures and health and safety systems are fully audited on a regular basis.

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Ventilation ductwork is the focus of a barrage of legislation, but it also makes good business sense to keep it clean.
Ventilation hygiene remains something of a grey area. While there is no actual law telling a building operator how clean their ductwork must be, there is plenty of legislation floating around that could make life very uncomfortable for anyone who doesn’t address this area.
Over 80% of kitchen extract ducts in the UK are never cleaned and are, therefore, in a hazardous state.
The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order, which was published in 2006 ramped up the pressure on building operators to address potential hazards from ventilation systems.
This comes on top of the Health and Safety At Work Act where building occupants could sue their employer for failing to safeguard their health if they pick up an infection from airborne bacteria.

Almost a quarter of the 24,000 accidental fires in non domestic buildings each year are attributed to cooking appliances, and in the last decade fires in grease extract ducts linked to catering facilities have caused considerable damage at Witney town centre, Heathrow Airport, South Mimms services and more recently the Hard Rock Café in London.
Building managers are rightly concerned about a visit from the Health & Safety Executive (HSE), but you might be surprised how sympathetic they will be if you can show evidence, including paper trails, that you have at least taken steps to address and monitor ventilation hygiene issues.
The potential risks associated with kitchen extract ventilation systems are now well documented. They will draw grease laden air directly from the areas above cookers, grills and fryers via the cooker hood and out to the atmosphere.  The filters usually found above the fryers are designed to trap grease particles, but they can never be 100% efficient and a significant number of these grease particles will pass through into the extract system.
This allows a potentially flammable coating to form on the inside of the canopy/extract plenum (the void behind the grease filters) in the extract ductwork and on the fan blades.  These grease deposits are easily ignited by even a small flash fire on or in the fryer, hob or grill and flames and heat can then quickly spread through the building.
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