Profile cover photo
Profile photo
CatCentric
8 followers -
Feline nutrition, general health, and behavior: Better lives through better care!
Feline nutrition, general health, and behavior: Better lives through better care!

8 followers
About
CatCentric's posts

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all!

This week we are going back to basics on the importance of "Maintaining whole-body health in the indoor cat".

Cats are born to hunt, chase, pounce, run, and climb. That need to move doesn’t vanish when they no longer have the outdoor space to do so. They are also born for vigilance, the awareness of their status as both predator and prey, and they have a need for avenues of escape and places in which to hide.

It is vital for their overall health and happiness that their indoor environment recognizes and addresses these and other innate, natural needs.

At CatCentric.org you can read more about how to enhance these needs using:
-Food, water and litter boxes;
-Play time
-Environment
-Safety
-Love

http://catcentric.org/behavior-and-psychology/maintaining-whole-body-health-in-the-indoor-cat/

Best,
~Holly
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all!

Did you know that from a genetic viewpoint, the modern housecat is virtually indistinguishable from Felis sylvestris lybica, the subspecies of wildcat called the African Wild Cat, that hails from the Middle Eastern deserts of Israel, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, and well as parts of Africa.

Although the African wild cat still exists to this day, mitochondrial genetic analyses indicates that our beloved housemates are likely descended from only five female cats taken from that region approximately 10,000 years ago.

The domestic cat (Felis catus) is closely related to three wild cats, the European wildcat (Felis sylvestris), the African wildcat (Felis lybica), and the sand cat (Felis nigripes) (Buff et al. 2014).

"Domestic cats are generally considered descendants of the Old World wildcats, but differ from these hypothesized progenitors in behavior, tameness, and coat color diversity" (Driscoll et al. 2007).

Interestingly, in both feral domestic cats (Felis catus) and wild cats (Felis sylvestris) small mammals were the dominate prey item followed by birds and hares (Biro et al. 2005). Studies have shown that the dietary preference in cats closely resembles their wild ancestors (Buff et al. 2014).

To read more about it, visit us at:
http://catcentric.org/…/fact-the-domesticated-cat-is-desce…/
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday to you and your kitties!! :D

When considering your cat’s weekly diet, why not add something she’ll actually get to hunt? Crickets are readily available in many pet stores and contain high amounts of protein and other essential nutrients, including taurine. In fact, Florence Dunkel, associate professor of entomology at Montana State University, notes that a 100 grams of insects contains more protein, calcium and iron than an equal amount of beef!

Crickets are also an ecologically sensitive – no land-clearing needed to raise them – and more sustainable feeding option than mass-produced farm animals. According to the United Nation’s, “Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed“, they use substantially less water and grain than livestock. Pound for pound, crickets require, “…12 times less feed than cattle, 4 times less feed than sheep, and half as much feed as pigs and broiler chickens.” In other words, the same amount of feed needed to produce 1 pound of beef will produce a full 12 pounds of crickets.

As if all that isn’t enough to perk your interest, crickets, like their genetic cousins, the ocean shrimp, are full of healthy Omega 3’s, making them as attractive on the menu as sardines or salmon oil. Unlike shrimp, however, crickets have zero cholesterol.

Plus, they’re just plain fun to catch! So drop a dozen in your tub and offer your kitty a super-nutritious snack and a chance to exercise her predator instincts. It’s a win-win! ♥

To read more about it, visit us at:
http://catcentric.org/…/fact-crickets-pack-an-awesome-nutr…/
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday everyone :)

Like a handful of other animals – including birds, dogs and dinosaurs – cats actually walk on their toes. This is the primary reason declawing, which includes amputation of their toes up to the first knuckle, is so cruel.

All cats have claws, and all except the cheetah can retract them at will. Along with the giraffe and the camel, cats step with both left legs, then both right legs when they walk or run.

Cats don’t have sweat glands on their bodies like we do. Instead, ‘though they do sweat through their paws, they rely more on the evaporation of saliva off their fur to maintain normal body temperature. Cat’s paws also contain scent glands, and the scent, mixed with the sweat from their paws, is used to mark their territory while they’re engaged in walking, kneading and scratching behaviors.

And speaking of scratching, in addition to marking their territory, cats use scratching posts and other surfaces to hook their claws in deep to allow them to engage in a full body stretch. This benefits them physically and mentally and is another reason not to declaw.

To read more about it, visit us at:
http://catcentric.org/…/fact-cats-walk-on-their-toes-and-s…/

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all :)

Let’s talk about scent and social behaviour!

According to Vitale Shreve and Udell (2016) cats collect social information using chemical cues first, i.e. sniffing and/or flehmen. They use sniffing to gather information about their surroundings, whether it’s smelling other humans, cats, nesting materials, urine, feces, etc. before any other behaviour is taken.

When placed in a new room, cats will begin by investigating a new area by sniffing it and/or using flehmen where they slightly open their mouth to allow scent molecules to reach their vomeronasal cavity. Once they have smelled a new area and deposited their scent, they can start to feel more settled and relaxed.

Cats also use their scent as a reference tool. This is why careful positioning of the litter boxes and scratching posts is essential for them to feel safe, but also prevent them from scratching or urinating in other areas.

Since cats are extremely effective sniffers, it may be possible in the future to train them for search and rescue since they are smaller and more flexible than dogs.

Cats are so cool.

Please visit us at Catcentric to read more random Friday Fun Facts: http://catcentric.org/blog/

Or to read more about it at:
http://www.appliedanimalbehaviour.com/article/S0168-1591%2816%2930350-1/abstract?cc=y=
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all :)

Let’s talk about scent and social behaviour!

According to Vitale Shreve and Udell (2016) cats collect social information using chemical cues first, i.e. sniffing and/or flehmen. They use sniffing to gather information about their surroundings, whether it’s smelling other humans, cats, nesting materials, urine, feces, etc. before any other behaviour is taken.

When placed in a new room, cats will begin by investigating a new area by sniffing it and/or using flehmen where they slightly open their mouth to allow scent molecules to reach their vomeronasal cavity. Once they have smelled a new area and deposited their scent, they can start to feel more settled and relaxed.

Cats also use their scent as a reference tool. This is why careful positioning of the litter boxes and scratching posts is essential for them to feel safe, but also prevent them from scratching or urinating in other areas.

Since cats are extremely effective sniffers, it may be possible in the future to train them for search and rescue since they are smaller and more flexible than dogs.

Cats are so cool.

Please visit us at Catcentric to read more random Friday Fun Facts: http://catcentric.org/blog/

Or to read more about it at:
http://www.appliedanimalbehaviour.com/article/S0168-1591%2816%2930350-1/abstract?cc=y=
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all :)

Let’s talk about scent and social behaviour!

According to Vitale Shreve and Udell (2016) cats collect social information using chemical cues first, i.e. sniffing and/or flehmen. They use sniffing to gather information about their surroundings, whether it’s smelling other humans, cats, nesting materials, urine, feces, etc. before any other behaviour is taken.

When placed in a new room, cats will begin by investigating a new area by sniffing it and/or using flehmen where they slightly open their mouth to allow scent molecules to reach their vomeronasal cavity. Once they have smelled a new area and deposited their scent, they can start to feel more settled and relaxed.

Cats also use their scent as a reference tool. This is why careful positioning of the litter boxes and scratching posts is essential for them to feel safe, but also prevent them from scratching or urinating in other areas.

Since cats are extremely effective sniffers, it may be possible in the future to train them for search and rescue since they are smaller and more flexible than dogs.

Cats are so cool.

Please visit us at Catcentric to read more random Friday Fun Facts: http://catcentric.org/blog/

Or to read more about it at:
http://www.appliedanimalbehaviour.com/article/S0168-1591%2816%2930350-1/abstract?cc=y=
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all :)

Let’s talk about scent and social behaviour!

According to Vitale Shreve and Udell (2016) cats collect social information using chemical cues first, i.e. sniffing and/or flehmen. They use sniffing to gather information about their surroundings, whether it’s smelling other humans, cats, nesting materials, urine, feces, etc. before any other behaviour is taken.

When placed in a new room, cats will begin by investigating a new area by sniffing it and/or using flehmen where they slightly open their mouth to allow scent molecules to reach their vomeronasal cavity. Once they have smelled a new area and deposited their scent, they can start to feel more settled and relaxed.

Cats also use their scent as a reference tool. This is why careful positioning of the litter boxes and scratching posts is essential for them to feel safe, but also prevent them from scratching or urinating in other areas.

Since cats are extremely effective sniffers, it may be possible in the future to train them for search and rescue since they are smaller and more flexible than dogs.

Cats are so cool.

Please visit us at Catcentric to read more random Friday Fun Facts: http://catcentric.org/blog/

Or to read more about it at:
http://www.appliedanimalbehaviour.com/article/S0168-1591%2816%2930350-1/abstract?cc=y=
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday all :)

Let’s talk about scent and social behaviour!

According to Vitale Shreve and Udell (2016) cats collect social information using chemical cues first, i.e. sniffing and/or flehmen. They use sniffing to gather information about their surroundings, whether it’s smelling other humans, cats, nesting materials, urine, feces, etc. before any other behaviour is taken.

When placed in a new room, cats will begin by investigating a new area by sniffing it and/or using flehmen where they slightly open their mouth to allow scent molecules to reach their vomeronasal cavity. Once they have smelled a new area and deposited their scent, they can start to feel more settled and relaxed.

Cats also use their scent as a reference tool. This is why careful positioning of the litter boxes and scratching posts is essential for them to feel safe, but also prevent them from scratching or urinating in other areas.

Since cats are extremely effective sniffers, it may be possible in the future to train them for search and rescue since they are smaller and more flexible than dogs.

Cats are so cool.

Please visit us at Catcentric to read more random Friday Fun Facts: http://catcentric.org/blog/

Or to read more about it at:
http://www.appliedanimalbehaviour.com/article/S0168-1591%2816%2930350-1/abstract?cc=y=
Photo

Post has attachment
Happy Fun Fact Friday y'all!

This week’s fun fact comes from a kitty book.

Did you know that in order for cats to avoid predators in the wild, they groom often because their saliva contains deodorizing enzymes which allows them to remain as scentless as possible?

This is also why your cat grooms him or herself immediately after eating - to prevent the smell of the prey they just consumed from attracting predators!

Everything happens for a reason in the cat world :)

Please visit us at Catcentric to read more random Friday Fun Facts:
http://catcentric.org/blog/

Reference:
Johnson-Bennett, P. 2007. Starting from scratch. How to correct behaviour problems in your adult cat. Penguin books. USA. 376pgs.
Wait while more posts are being loaded