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Casey Brienza
Lecturer in Publishing and Digital Media at City University London - http://www.caseybrienza.com
Lecturer in Publishing and Digital Media at City University London - http://www.caseybrienza.com
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Just published! "The Field of American Media Sociology: Origins, Resurrection, and Consolidation" by Casey Brienza and Matthias Revers http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/soc4.12384/abstract

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JUST PUBLISHED! For a special issue in Journal of Historical Sociology on "Academic Freedom and the Contemporary Academy."

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A summary rather than a review, honestly, but that makes it a useful addition to reviews of 'Manga in America.' http://review31.co.uk/article/view/382/importing-manga

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Routledge has put its logo on the 'Global Manga' anthology. I wonder if they'll reprint in paperback?

My review of the book 'Embracing Differences: Transnational Cultural Flows Between Japan and the United States' by Iris-Aya Laemmerhirt for the journal Pacific Affairs. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/paaf/paaf/2016/00000089/00000001/art00030

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Inaugural editorial lineup for Inks, the official journal of the soon-to-be-launched Comics Studies Society http://www.comicssociety.org/journal/

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WHOA. "#1 New Release in Media Studies" on Amazon~!!! #TakeaPictureItWillLastLonger 
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A lovely review written by a non-academic reader and manga fan:

"Manga in America: Book Publishing and the Domestication of Japanese Comics is the book I wish had existed during the shakeup of manga and manga production in 2011. But since those events are part of the history that Manga in America examines, this is a futile wish.

Nevertheless, this is fascinating reading for anyone who cares (or cared) about the subject matter, and essential reading for anyone who wants to understand where we’ve been and where we’re going. Don’t let its origin as an adaptation of Brienza’s doctoral dissertation fool you. Those without academic or sociological inclinations might want to skip the methodological explanations in Chapter 1, but otherwise this is a smooth, conversational read. Brienza imposes order (and confidentiality) on what could have been an unwieldy recounting of the interviews with manga insiders that comprised her fieldwork."

http://lawless523.dreamwidth.org/392014.html

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"I don’t think it is an exaggeration to say that at this point, Manga in America is a one-of-a-kind book. As someone who has been following manga in the U.S. (and the U.S. manga industry) going back to Viz’s mid-1990’s editions of Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind and Sanctuary, and Mixx‘s single monthly issues of Card Captor Sakura, I am plain-out excited to know that it exists – and pleased to know that it is high-quality work, and one that gives its subject a treatment that is elegant and comprehensive, without mistakes, omissions, or needless sensationalism. And, I look forward to following the impact that Manga in America will have on how scholars write about the production of Japanese comics – and their reception around the world."
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