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Casey Artner
Worked at Ground Control Southern Oregon
Attended Southern Oregon University
Lives in Medford, OR
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Casey Artner

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Since when can G+ do full tweets? This is actually pretty cool!
“.@WSJopinion Mass surveillance doesn't make us safer. Congress has had YEARS to consider next steps. To say we need more time is clueless”
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Casey Artner

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Love this one, and try to live by it:
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.
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Yonatan Zunger originally shared to Brief Dispatches:
 
A few weeks ago, this image showed up on a notorious hyper-granola website called "The Naked Label," along with the reminder that "we cannot make better food than nature." I want you to look at it for a moment, and tell me if you spot anything wrong with this image.

Next, I want to get this on a t-shirt, with the back of the shirt printed with detailed biological and medical information about the fungus depicted here -- the 100% all-natural amanita muscaria, which is both poisonous and psychoactive. In fact, I want a whole series of shirts with this same logo, and all sorts of other natural things depicted -- say, a plague bacillus, a golden dart frog, and maybe someone getting eaten by a bear.


But surely we all know what the website meant, and I'm just needlessly nitpicking on their rather dubious art direction? No: I'm criticizing them for the "naturalistic fallacy:" the belief that "natural" things are good, and "artificial" things are bad, even without any real understanding of what one and the other really are. It's a way to perform one's social class ["I only eat natural foods, of course; I would never let my children encounter anything packaged."] while drawing political and financial ire at technologies which are out there saving human lives every day. We get to worry about obesity epidemics because until a few years ago, we were worried about famines. I know: several of my family members nearly died from them.

There was recently an excellent article about real food concerns and how to separate them from populist nonsense; if you're at all interested, I recommend it. It's called "The biggest concerns about GMO food aren't really about GMO's," and it's by +Beth Skwarecki​: http://vitals.lifehacker.com/the-biggest-concerns-about-gmo-food-arent-really-about-1702906290

For the lovely image below and more about it, and the nonsense which sites like that purvey, a h/t to Yvette d'Entremont (@thescibabe on Twitter) and a recommendation for her article: http://gawker.com/the-bullshit-hypocrisy-of-all-natural-foods-1702686054
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One of the more fascinating interviews I've seen recently. Also in comic form: http://www.stuartmcmillen.com/comics_en/rat-park/#page-1
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I hope I don't hit insolvency.
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Have some feels.

"I have been - and always shall be - your friend.": http://youtu.be/SPBGZRRrEKM
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Casey Artner

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Yonatan Zunger originally shared to Brief Dispatches:
 
A group of researchers has built a way to mine the giant corpora of pictures people have posted publicly (on sites like Picasa and Flickr) and build time-lapse images of landmarks. This involves huge technical challenges of identifying landmarks, building 3D models of them, stabilizing the images, and normalizing the motion and lighting -- and so far, they've managed to find over 20,000 such images, showing everything from changing seasons, to building construction, to moving glaciers.

They've made a video showing off their favorites: https://youtu.be/wptzVm0tngc. You can read the paper at http://grail.cs.washington.edu/projects/timelapse/ , and hopefully they'll soon have a way to see all their results.

h/t +Nate Koechley 
There are a zillion digital photos in the public domain and scientists have just figured out something very cool to do with them. A team from Google and
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I've been struggling for days to figure out what to say about Baltimore, or about the endless sequence of news reports of innocent men and women being beaten, robbed, and murdered by police officers across the country: Freddie Gray, Walter Scott, Mike Brown, Tamir Rice, Henry Davis, Rekia Boyd, Sharmel Edwards, Eric Garner, a list which just seems to go on and on and never stop. (You can read http://goo.gl/T8AVu4http://goo.gl/5kfcjp, or http://goo.gl/eH4zSv for more; see http://mappingpoliceviolence.org/unarmed for unarmed victims in particular, or simply go to killedbypolice.net for a full list of news stories of police killings in the US, if you feel like being even more depressed at the state of the country)

I'm still not really ready to talk about this in depth. There is too much going on, there are too many layers to it, for me to write a short and simple post trying to make sense of such a profoundly broken world. It makes me painfully aware of how there are two different police worlds in this country: some places (including the one where I live now) where the police see themselves as part of the community, and they are liked, respected, and trusted; some places where the police see the community as a mass of perps to be forced down, where they are feared, distrusted, and hated. When you live in one of these worlds, it's almost impossible to imagine the other.

I'm not going to offer the usual platitude of "rioting is bad, but." Everyone seems to want to offer this as a way of bolstering their "I'm not really supporting this frightening thing" credentials, often along with asking why the protests in Baltimore, in Ferguson, in anywhere else couldn't be "more like MLK." But this is a profound misunderstanding of King's work, as well: his peaceful protests happened in the context of pervasive violence, and were often the targets of unchecked violence. In fact, he gave a speech in 1968 which feels like it could have been given yesterday: (The full text being at http://goo.gl/l7Lq8N, and it's all quite relevant)

It is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.

And fortunately, on a day where I don't know what to say, several others have spoken, and said things worth hearing. One is Ta-Nehisi Coates, one of the best journalistic voices of our day, with the short article linked below. Another is John Angelos, COO of the Baltimore Orioles, who responded memorably and passionately to people who were upset that a game had been cancelled: you can read what he said at

http://www.businessinsider.com/orioles-executive-defends-freddie-gray-protesters-in-baltimore-2015-4

And third is the President, whose words today I'll leave you with: (https://youtu.be/ZmJlAxB5obg?t=3646)

This is not new. This has been going on for decades. And without making any excuses for criminal activities that take place in these communities, we also know if you have impoverished communities that have been stripped away of opportunity — where children are born into abject poverty, they've got parents, often because of substance abuse problems or incarceration or lack of education, and themselves can't do right by their kids, if it's more likely that those kids end up in jail or dead than that they go to college, and communities where there are no fathers who can provide guidance to young men, communities where there’s no investment, and manufacturing's been stripped away, and drugs have flooded the community and the drug industry ends up being the primary employer for a lot of folks — in those environments, if we think that we're just going to send the police to do the dirty work of containing the problems that arise there without, as a nation, and as a society saying what can we do to change those communities to help lift up those communities and give those kids opportunity, then we're not going to solve this problem, and we'll go through this same cycles of periodic conflicts between the police and communities, and the occasional riots in the streets and everybody will feign concern until it goes away and we just go about our business as usual.
When nonviolence begins halfway through the war with the aggressor calling time out, it exposes itself as a ruse.
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"No"
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Turn it up and rock out for the great man himself.
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Live long and prosper, while resting in peace, Mr Spock.

Leonard Nimoy - The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins: http://youtu.be/Aik18TiJjA8
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People
In his circles
153 people
Have him in circles
930 people
Andrew Halych's profile photo
Douglas Pierre's profile photo
Stelian Arjoca's profile photo
David Julio's profile photo
Tiago Torégão's profile photo
Ramesh Ramloll's profile photo
joseph patterson's profile photo
Mary Artner's profile photo
Robert Scoble's profile photo
Collections Casey is following
Education
  • Southern Oregon University
    BS Computer Science, Minor in Philosophy, 2012
  • South Medford High School
    2004
  • Oregon Institute of Technology
    Hardware & Software Engineering Technology
  • AI-Class.com, Stanford Online
    Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, 2011 - 2011
    Top 5% of class.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Story
Bragging rights
Successfully had peanut-sized parathyroid tumor removed Oct 2013! Wooo!
Work
Occupation
Software!
Skills
Critical Thought, Android, C/#/++, Go Language, MFC, Patching Systems, SharePoint
Employment
  • Ground Control Southern Oregon
    Computer Tech, 2009 - 2014
  • Harry & David IT
    SharePoint/.NET Intern, 2008 - 2008
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Medford, OR
Previously
Central Point, OR - Klamath Falls, OR - Canoga Park, CA
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Great food. Great service.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
2 reviews
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