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Carol Smith
Works at IBM
Attended Denison University
Lives in Pittsburgh, PA
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Carol Smith

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Article touching on AI ethics. How do we benefit from the awesomeness that AI promises without sacrificing diverse work opportunities for our communities?
Elon Musk met with ethicists recently at a secret conference to figure out the future of AI. The AI industry is taking off. Should we be scared?
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I should start studing to become the first AI therapist.
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Carol Smith

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The long nose of innovation - discussed at celebration of 20 years of HCII program at CMU. Many friends/family still aren't sure what I do - guys we have to keep on the nose. :)
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Worth the read. 
I've been that bitter, lonely gamer looking for someone to blame. And I'm devastated that it's come to this
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Hackers are just people who have great memories and look at a computer like a jigsaw puzzle. The best are hired by Uncle Sam.
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Carol Smith

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In case you missed it (I did), this is a thought provoking article that discusses UCD (towards the end) and how it affects Agile.
In 2001, seventeen American, British and Canadian software engineers and IT managers met at a ski resort in Snowbird, Utah, to start a movement to remake the way software is built. Over the previous decade, the attendees had independently created similar processes for organising and managing ...
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Copy 'n' paste of wot I wrote on A.N.Other-List for what it's worth ;-) ----

I have to admit I didn’t find this particularly compelling when I read it a while back.  It struck me more as something written by somebody who has read a lot about agile, but not worked on many agile teams. Especially good agile teams (there are lots of teams labelling themselves agile, but aren’t really doing agile in any meaningful way).

Both in the way it characterised the motivations behind agile, and some of the details about practices (agile certainly doesn’t 'rejecting documentation' for example, it reprioritises and repurposes it). Taking the 'protecting the interests of knowledge workers who build software' as the primary motivation for agile doesn’t match my experiences of working on agile teams at all.

I think the problems it highlights are not with agile, but with the value system of the organisation that the agile team sits in. 

In particular:

"Agile is naïve in assuming that a new system’s customer (who is often drawn from the ranks of management) can adequately represent the goals, needs, context and interests of its users. Agilists often collapse the distinction, defining “the customer” as the people who are paying for the software and who are going to use it, as if they are simply the same."

doesn’t match most of my experiences - where teams have been very aware of that distinction and have been very active in addressing it. Folk have been talking about UX and usability almost from the time that the Agile term was coined (agile-usability mailing list started in 2002 I think, more than seven years of a UX track at Agile 20XX, etc.)

This is not a problem "agilists" have. It’s a problem companies have. Some of them just happen to building things with agile practices. You see exactly the same issue in non-agile companies. Right problem. Wrong cause.

And the summary of Lean (and why a bunch of folk in the Agile/UX world, including myself, are exploring it) is so deeply wrong I don’t really know where to start…

----
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What can we do to make tech better for women?
Stories from 716 women who left tech show that the industry’s culture is the primary culprit, not any issues related to science education.
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Interesting reading for hiring remote workers.
Over the course of Zapier's 34-month existence, we've grown from three founders cramped in a small apartment to a team of 16 around the world. While we're certainly not experts at hiring, we have picked up a few tricks (and things to avoid) to make building a remote team easier.
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Carol Smith

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My Not-so-Smart Smart Watch

I have come to rely on my smart phone completely. I use it to organize my life and work tasks, access email, social media, take pictures, and navigate. A smart watch seemed like a natural step in the progression of my digital life experience. 

I've been wearing an Android smart watch (specifically, the LG G Watch) for a few months. I've found that it is really helpful when I have a busy meeting day. It provides a handy way to preview alerts for upcoming meetings and my ToDoIst app alerts. It also gives me at least a preview of incoming calls and I can dismiss or attend to them as needed. The GPS integration with my phone is very nice.

However, on weekends I leave it at home and on work days when I'm just at my desk I usually wear it as a watch, but I don't connect it to my phone. This is partially due to the battery drain on my phone (slightly more than a typical day) and also because the redundant alerts just get annoying.

Size
It does matter and I am very conscious of it - the watch is quite large and noticeable on my wrist. I'm 5'2" (heels get me to 5'5" if I'm lucky) and the watch covers more of my arm than two of my typical watches. The wide, though comfortable, band is not attractive. This watch was clearly designed for a man. 

Using my palm to put it to sleep is surprisingly challenging. My palm is just not that big. I'm not sure if it's the lack of light or the "heat" from the hand that it senses, but I just don't provide what it needs to sleep.

Visibility
It's audacious. I assume the man it was designed for typically wears long sleeves at work. When you are in a meeting, elbow-to-elbow with colleagues, you don't necessarily want them all to be able to read your personal alerts.  While I can turn the alerts off, what's the point of wearing it if it's not alerting you?

It's winter now so I'm always in long sleeves, plus being a manager I tend to wear a jacket most days. I do wonder what if my behavior will change as the weather warms up. I don't think I'll be as eager to put it on (if you could call me eager now).

In addition, there are times when I don't want to call attention to electronics on my arm. A giant glowing device on my arm calls more attention than I would prefer when I am trying to keep a low profile.  

Pedometer
As I expected the pedometer is not as accurate as my FitBit and way over-estimates my activity. It doesn't help that I wear watches on my right arm and I am right-handed. So if I do any activities - cleaning, tossing a ball, etc. they are typically with my right arm. It looks like I've been quite active, but really I was mixing cake batter (not a relaxing activity, but not an aerobic one either).

Google has my numbers
Google already owns me as far as access to data. Now they have my steps. Some watches also track heart rate and other data. Hey Google, how's my heart rate when I'm reading that news article? How about when my GPS showed I was at a basketball game? How about when I took those photos of my kids? When I responded to that inflammatory tweet? So much data is being collected. At what point does connecting the dots between all of this information start to be too much? I'm still game, but aware of the risks.

On the other side, as a big data nerd, this amount of data is awe inspiring. The data that Jawbone collected (https://jawbone.com/blog/napa-earthquake-effect-on-sleep/) during the earthquake in California a few months ago was not terribly helpful, but really interesting. Think you're the only one who can't go back to sleep? Nope.

It's late for holiday gifts, but if you are still considering a smart watch, consider carefully who will receive it. These watches make a great gift for people who need their hands during the day and cannot reach for the phone, people who use their GPS a lot, and those that work in an environment where they need to be kept apprised of alerts from their phone. If you have one already, please share your experience in the comments.
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Carol Smith

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This is a wonderful compilation of tweets giving the lovely Princess Bride movie (which I'm proud to say our kids like) quotes a feminist twist.
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Apple's process revealed (sort of).
Many aspects of Apple's product development process have long been shrouded in mystery. The process is discussed in a new book Inside Apple: How America's Most Admired--and Secretive--Company ...
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Carol Smith

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This is a great way to describe hashtags and how they relate to our conversations both on and offline.
I have spent the year obsessed with Instagram and have learned a lot about how hashtags are used for listening, connecting, sharing and engaging inside of Instagram....
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Time to take a walk!
Visual explanation why prolonged sitting and standing is unproductive and how you can improve it. The key is balancing between sitting and standing.
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I love the use of type style to let the reader determine how much they will see of this movie review. Sounds like a decent movie.
Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike bring the battling young marrieds of Gillian Flynn's best-selling thriller to creepy screen life
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that is really cool.
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Have her in circles
429 people
Michael Helbling's profile photo
Reinaldo Silva's profile photo
Jill McCauslin's profile photo
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Ben Werner's profile photo
Quoc Huy Nguyen's profile photo
Stephen Smith's profile photo
Fabian Rademacher's profile photo
Education
  • Denison University
    Journalistic Photo & Video, 1992 - 1996
  • DePaul University
    Human-Computer Interaction, 2000 - 2002
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Other names
Carol Jacobs
Story
Tagline
I make it easier for people to get things done. I'm a wife, mom of two great kids, and a runner.
Work
Occupation
UX (User Experience) Professional
Employment
  • IBM
    Design Team Manager, IBM Watson, Pittsburgh, 2015 - present
  • UPMC TDC
    Manager, UX Design, 2014 - 2015
  • Thermo Fisher Scientific
    eBusiness User Experience Manager, 2014 - 2014
  • The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company
    Customer Insights Manager, 2012 - 2013
  • Perficient
    Lead UX Business Consultant, 2011 - 2012
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Pittsburgh, PA
Previously
Akron, Ohio - Loudonville, Ohio - Centreville, VA - Chicago, IL - Columbus, Ohio - Charleston, WV
Great ice cream shop with old style parlor appeal.
Public - in the last week
reviewed in the last week
Tasty food and great atmosphere. The restaurant is large and roomy with an out door seating area.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Fun farm atmosphere and friendly staff. Beautiful area and good produce.
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Excellent buffet and friendly staff
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
38 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Food is wonderful and that alone would give it 5 stars. Service is friendly and good. The interior is a little dark and the outside looks sketchy. We will definitely return.
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Great food and nice atmosphere. Food was served quickly and staff is very friendly. No buffet for dinner but meals are reasonably priced.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great buffet for lunch
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago