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Carol Darnell
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Carol Darnell

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Mulling over the feasibility of a powerful NPC wizard being able to separate the two halves of a scion NPC, particularly a Changeling.  Starts out as temporary, with the fae half not being able to leave the NeverNever unless summoned - similar to other summoned creatures from there. It would have memories and some abilities, but no soul, that would be the human half's.  Re-integration is possible, but after a certain time it could 1. Not be possible, too much change between the two halves for a proper re-integration, or 2. One of  the halves (or both) could decide this is what they want.  Complication for a PC: the NPC is his wife.

Thoughts?
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Matt Cogoli's profile photoCarol Darnell's profile photo
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Well, her inner conflict has come up in the game before. The warlock doing this is doing it to cause strife and pain to the wizard and his friends, of whom the NPC's PC husband is one. Rather than just have this be a damsel/friend in distress situation, I want it to spark a further conversation about the conflicting natures of scion characters. If you asked her, she doesn't want to be split, she doesn't even like facing that she has a Choice to make. In the attack, I want the situation to come upon her unexpectedly, bringing those subconscious conflicts to the surface.

I want to use this to have the PCs further explore themes like their own (sometimes dual) natures. Still not sure if either "half" can survive without the other. Even if they find a way, how will each be changed?  If allowed to live, how will they grow into new individuals, etc. Our group likes conflicts like that - they love the hard questions :)
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Carol Darnell

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The review has been posted at http://www.agcpodcast.info for anyone who is interested.
 
Running through my rough-draft review of Fate Core - I would like to pose a question: Do you think there is an ideal number of players for a Fate game?  Do you feel that larger games would bog down the world/setting creation process?  

Of course any large game is going to be taxing, but I'm thinking more about the relationships, and a bit of "too-many-cooks" as well.

While it could make sense that all the characters do know each other to some extent, would they know each other well enough to add to each other's background from a mechanical / Aspect perspective?

Sure, characters A, B and C could know each other, but what if D only knows A pretty well?  That could work, but when you get to F or G, does it become too unwieldy? 

I'm thinking that you could at that point have two groups that are coming from different areas of the world/setting, and each group could have participated in creating their own area, complete with current and impending issues, and other factions, being brought together to fight a bigger evil.

What does everyone think?
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Carol Darnell

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Running through my rough-draft review of Fate Core - I would like to pose a question: Do you think there is an ideal number of players for a Fate game?  Do you feel that larger games would bog down the world/setting creation process?  

Of course any large game is going to be taxing, but I'm thinking more about the relationships, and a bit of "too-many-cooks" as well.

While it could make sense that all the characters do know each other to some extent, would they know each other well enough to add to each other's background from a mechanical / Aspect perspective?

Sure, characters A, B and C could know each other, but what if D only knows A pretty well?  That could work, but when you get to F or G, does it become too unwieldy? 

I'm thinking that you could at that point have two groups that are coming from different areas of the world/setting, and each group could have participated in creating their own area, complete with current and impending issues, and other factions, being brought together to fight a bigger evil.

What does everyone think?
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Andrew Jensen's profile photohari capra's profile photoCarol Darnell's profile photoSusann Ryser's profile photo
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I'm taking your 5 man band into account, quite a bit, when I say 4 players seems best. If I wasn't considering what you said, +Andrew Jensen , then I'd be saying 3 players is better. 
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Carol Darnell changed her profile photo.
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Carol Darnell

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I got to play in one of these sessions run by Sean himself, and it was so much fun!  Can't wait to play again.
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WTF? Gail Simone fired from Batgirl? She brought intelligent writing and good storylines.  You gave a crap about the character because she was three-dimensional.  She had doubts and fears, and her strength and courage was in facing them and overcoming them.  She wasn't perfect when she did it, but she did it because it was the right thing to do.  Now (in my opinion) DC's new editor for Batgirl, Brian Cunningham has apparently decided that a realistic female hero is apparently a bad idea.  I loved the Batgirl series, and hearing that none of Simone's plans for the title are likely going to be carried through, I'm just going to have to let our FLCS know to take that out of the file after the last of her issues is published.

If the title were failing, if the story was bad, I'd understand this.  But the graphic placed #4 on the NYT Bestseller's list, and the title is one of the best -selling in the New 52.  This makes NO SENSE!

(info from the following article):

http://www.themarysue.com/gail-simone-off-batgirl/
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Mick Bradley's profile photoCarol Darnell's profile photoBrianna “Brie” Sheldon's profile photoSusann Ryser's profile photo
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I've calmed down a touch after talking it out and reading some of Ms. Simone's tweets.  It was nice to hear that the other Bat-Family writers were backing her up, even if the end result was that she was still fired.  I went fairly quickly to the "editor is hostile to women" explanation without the facts to back it up.  But I really do get the feeling sometimes that it's harder for strong, realistic female characters to get the kind of support that their male counterparts get, and I still don't understand why a strong-selling, critically popular book has its writer fired.

I've heard "creative differences" cited too as a reason (don't remember if that was in Wired's article or another one) as well.  Which doesn't prove my assumption, but doesn't disprove it either.

On the plus side, Ms. Simone was tweeting about other projects she'd like to do and mentioned that DC would be interested in having her on other projects as well.  

On another note, who else is going to check out "Leaving Megalopolis" when it comes out?
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Carol Darnell

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Jeff Jarvis originally shared:
 
The beauty of a hashtag is that no one can control it.

A hashtag is not like a marketing, media, or political message, whose creator thinks it can be created and controlled. It is not like the namespace in domains, on Facebook and Google+, or in trademarks, for anyone can use a hashtag without permission or payment. It's not like a dictionary with one definition. It's not like a word on an FCC list that prohibits or chills its use.

A hashtag is open and profoundly democratic. People gather around a hashtag. They salute it and spread it or ignore it and let it wither. They imbue it with their own meaning. The creator quickly and inevitably loses control of it.

That is what the #fuckyouwashington escapade has taught me: the power and importance of the hashtag as a platform. Hashtags allow us to gather around topics, events, and actions across platforms. Hashtags are in our control.

It's quaint that some folks lobbied to get me to change the hashtag, as if I controlled it. Some scolded me for not scolding Congress or the GOP or the Democrats or the White House. But what was fascinating about the #fuckyouwashington is how it brought out users' opinions -- rather than mine -- on why Washington is fucked up and by whom. Soon after the hashtag got out there, people starting tweeting "#fuckyouwashington for...", filling in their grievances.

Humorless Washingtonians got pissed at me for supposedly maligning their fair if stifling city. How inane.

Some wanted me to clean up the hashtag because it offended them. But as I tweeted in response, #dagnabbitwashington would not have had the same impact. It was the profanity about profane politics that made it take off, I believe.

No less than John Perry Barlow (@jpbarlow) and @anonyops tried to change the hashtag to better assure it could get past filters some suspect Twitter puts on its trending topics list. "The hashtag is now #FYW," they and others decreed. But they made the mistake of thinking they could control this any more than I could. I didn't much want the discussion to become forked, but I didn't have anything to say about it either.

By the way, some Twitter folks told Jeff Howe (@crowdsourcing) that Twitter doesn't filter the Trending list for naughty words. But then, as he points out, their protests don't explain how lesser tags made the list and #fuckyouwashington didn't.

I don't much care about the trending list in any case. It is a product of mass-media-think: Only the biggest win, goes that thinking. But online, even the biggest topics are small. Though I think Twitter should be transparent with its statistics, we don't need it to be, as Topsy, Trendsmap, and Trendistic can count for us. According to Topsy.com, by latest count, #fuckyouwashington produced 84k tweets. In mass-media audience terms, that's tiny. But then again, how many of those opinions would ever have made it into a letters-to-the-editor column in a newspaper? 84k opinions got expressed and seen by some untold community thanks to the coalescing power of the hashtag.

We don't want an institution to hold our conversation hostage -- not media, not Twitter. Hashtags can free us from that fence. Through discussion around hashtags, we can hear the voice of the people, unmediated.

#fuckyouwashington got some attention in media -- but after the fact. Media are no longer needed to create critical mass. Indeed, appearances on CBS and NBC network news and on the sites of the Washington Post, Reuters, and even German papers didn't cause spikes in the usage of the hashtag, which is now pretty much petered-out.

Note that well: media now follow the public conversation. That's as it should be, according to scholar James Carey, via Jay Rosen, who explained his view: "The press does not ‘inform’ the public. It is ‘the public’ that ought to inform the press. The true subject matter of journalism is the conversation the public is having with itself.” That natural state of the relationship of media-to-public is made possible by the hashtag.

The hashtag was invented by Chris Messina only three years ago. So far, its power has been limited to Twitter. But I see an opportunity to expand its use and its empowerment the more it is supported on other platforms. When Google+ finally gets search and when it releases its API, it would be wonderful to see it enable users to easily enter tags and cluster conversations around them. There's an opportunity to use tag data to learn more about the topicality of conversations and content all around the net, on Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, maybe Facebook. There's our chance to limit the power of these silos.

All that from the humble hashtag.
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Have her in circles
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  • University of Louisville
    Psychology, 1994 - 1999
  • University of Kentucky
    Library and Information Science, 2002 - 2004
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Co-host / Research gal on All Games Considered, Freelance editor
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