Profile

Cover photo
Carlyn Maw
Attended Haverford College
710 followers|13,611 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Carlyn Maw

Whatcha Makin'?  - 
 
We're doing a new Arduino class at crashspace.org - I haven't even put it on our blog yet. It is trying to be simple but complete. Tired of classes that all you have at the end is a breadboard and an Arduino on a slab. Would have previously submitted this to the calendar but I'm not sure where that has gone to.  I think the prototypes came out pretty cute.
3
Add a comment...

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
I think this speaks for itself...
1
2
Wook Wook's profile photorod van meter's profile photo

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
 Maggie Koerth-Baker in the NYT Magazine this week:

The electric light was a failure.

Invented by the British chemist Humphry Davy in the early 1800s, it spent nearly 80 years being passed from one initially hopeful researcher to another, like some not-quite-housebroken puppy. In 1879, Thomas Edison finally figured out how to make an incandescent light bulb that people would buy. But that didn’t mean the technology immediately became successful. It took another 40 years, into the 1920s, for electric utilities to become stable, profitable businesses. And even then, success happened only because the utilities created other reasons to consume electricity. They invented the electric toaster and the electric curling iron and found lots of uses for electric motors. They built Coney Island. They installed electric streetcar lines in any place large enough to call itself a town. All of this, these frivolous gadgets and pleasurable diversions, gave us the light bulb.

We tend to rewrite the histories of technological innovation, making myths about a guy who had a great idea that changed the world. In reality, though, innovation isn’t the goal; it’s everything that gets you there. It’s bad financial decisions and blueprints for machines that weren’t built until decades later. It’s the important leaps forward that synthesize lots of ideas, and it’s the belly-up failures that teach us what not to do.

When we ignore how innovation actually works, we make it hard to see what’s happening right in front of us today. If you don’t know that the incandescent light was a failure before it was a success, it’s easy to write off some modern energy innovations — like solar panels — because they haven’t hit the big time fast enough.

Worse, the fairy-tale view of history implies that innovation has an end. It doesn’t. What we want and what we need keeps changing. The incandescent light was a 19th-century failure and a 20th- century success. Now it’s a failure again, edged out by new technologies, like LEDs, that were, themselves, failures for many years.

That’s what this issue is about: all the little failures, trivialities and not-quite-solved mysteries that make the successes possible. This is what innovation looks like. It’s messy, and it’s awesome. 
1
Thomas Edwards's profile photo
 
This is like 3D.  Stereoscopy was known about in the 1840s.  Polarized 3-D projection was demonstrated experimentally in the 1890s, and became very practical after Polaroid was developed in the 1930's.  Non-glassed based 3D systems using parallax barrier and lenticular systems were developed in the first decade of the 1900's.  Only recently has 3D movies and non-glasses 3D displays become really practical.

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
I love watching things move...
Steve originally shared:
 
Making objects self assemble using a heat lamp and an inkjet printer.
More info here: http://news.ncsu.edu/releases/wmsdickeyfolding/
5
1
Robin Gruver's profile photo

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
Very cool, and the right direction! Go Fayetteville.
Audrey Watters originally shared:
 
The Fayetteville Free Library is building what appears to be the first makerspace in a U.S. public library. It has a Makerbot (a 3D printer), and it has big plans to help bring the next generation of technology tools to its community.
1

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
Now that's a killer trick or treat costume.
Cody Sumter originally shared:
 
Remember when Boston Dynamics showed off BigDog, their awesome quadruped robot, and you scoffed and said "Come back to me when you've built bipedal cylons"?

Well... hi.
3
2
Nick Garcia's profile photoRobin Gruver's profile photo
In their circles
312 people
Have them in circles
710 people
David Dickinson's profile photo
Sai Sriskandarajah's profile photo
TIOEE EngineeringEducation's profile photo
Pete Prodoehl's profile photo
valdeir monteiro's profile photo
Gel Gsm's profile photo
Lance Pickens's profile photo
stephicon jones's profile photo
Hem Raj Pandey's profile photo

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
1

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
Mhhhawwwwww!
2
1
Joachim Thuau's profile photo

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is too funny. A Chrome extension that changes all the gendered words in the webpage you're reading. A really good way to test your assumptions!
Jailbreak the Patriarchy: my first Chrome extension. I just released my first Chrome extension! It's called Jailbreak the Patriarchy, and if you're running Chrome, you can head over here to in...
2
19
Judy Bauer's profile photoRob Ray's profile photo

Carlyn Maw

Shared publicly  - 
 
Vague technology laws. Lovely.
Scott Beale originally shared:
 
Protect IP and SOPA, A New Round of Federal Anti-Piracy Laws
http://laughingsquid.com/protect-ip-and-sopa-a-new-round-of-federal-anti-piracy-laws/
1
People
In their circles
312 people
Have them in circles
710 people
David Dickinson's profile photo
Sai Sriskandarajah's profile photo
TIOEE EngineeringEducation's profile photo
Pete Prodoehl's profile photo
valdeir monteiro's profile photo
Gel Gsm's profile photo
Lance Pickens's profile photo
stephicon jones's profile photo
Hem Raj Pandey's profile photo
Basic Information
Other names
carlynorama
Education
  • Haverford College
    1993 - 1997
  • New York University
    Interactive Telecommunications Program, 2003 - 2005