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Carlos Cordero
Lives in Hamilton, New Zealand
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From Alana:
 
Sometimes you just feel like a little bit of comfort food... here is one of my favourite dinner dishes - it's so good even the boys in my house will make it! #LowFODMAP #FODMAPfriendly #FODMAP #dairyfree   #glutenfree  
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Are you an amateur astronomer? The Rosetta mission has an opportunity for you, one that will allow you to collaborate with professional astronomers and study a comet in tandem with a real space mission!

Details: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/04/08/rosetta-ground-based-campaign-calling-all-amateur-astronomers/

Via +NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory #Rosetta  
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#CometWatch is back with two images, to offer a taste of Rosetta's trajectory in the past couple of weeks. The first of today's images is a 2x2 montage of NAVCAM images obtained on 28 March from a distance of 31.3 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. 

More in the blog: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/04/08/near-and-far-cometwatch-28-march-2-april/

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

#comet   #67P   #NAVCAM   #Rosetta  
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#CometWatch is back with two images, to offer a taste of Rosetta's trajectory in the past couple of weeks. The first of today's images is a 2x2 montage of NAVCAM images obtained on 28 March from a distance of 31.3 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. 

More in the blog: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/04/08/near-and-far-cometwatch-28-march-2-april/

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

#comet   #67P   #NAVCAM   #Rosetta  
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Using Google Tag Manager for Visitors Without JavaScript
/via +LunaMetrics  #analytics   #gtm  

"Sometimes, it can be useful to track browsers that do not execute JavaScript, whether we’re tracking hits, email click throughs, or other image tags. This can help your organization gauge how many users cannot make use of JavaScript-powered features, determine if things like headless browser-based bots are frequently scraping your site, and understand more about the differences in what Google Analytics records versus what your server logs might show.

Fortunately, Google Tag Manager has some fantastic built-in features to make doing this a snap, and you may not even realize that it’s already implemented on your site!"
You can use Google Tag Manager's built-in features to track users who don't have JavaScript enabled - even tracking them in Google Analytics!
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How do we train our astronauts? Through years of rigorous technical, health & safety training. They develop skills in systems, robotics, spacecraft operations, space engineering activities and even learn Russian. As we develop deep space exploration missions on our #JourneyToMars, we are investigating current training methods in order to adapt to the longer and longer missions.

Learn more: http://go.nasa.gov/1NKPjcz
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Carlos Cordero

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Calling all amateur astronomers: Join the Rosetta mission's ground-based campaign that will allow you to collaborate with professional astronomers and study a comet in tandem with a real space mission. Details: http://go.nasa.gov/1FjurrU

#NASABeyond
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A recent paper presented results from Rosetta's GIADA instrument reveals the properties of Comet 67P's 'fluffy' and compact dust particles.

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/04/09/giada-investigates-comets-fluffy-dust-grains/

#Rosetta #67P  
Tweet In a recent paper published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, the GIADA team present their findings on the properties of dust particles from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This blog post has been prepared with inputs from lead author Marco Fulle, and GIADA principal investigator Alessandra Rotundi. GIADA, the Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator, is designed to capture dust particles in the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenk...
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L+134, L+135: Logbook

The arrival of the Dragon resupply vehicle is now less than a couple of weeks away and it’s amazing to watch the Station getting ready for it.

I wish I could say that I have the overall picture, but that’s up to people way smarter than me who sit in the control centers and run the show. Up here, we just try to do our best in performing our daily tasks, but these are of course all pieces of a puzzle that will eventually become a full visiting vehicle mission, from capture to release, with a significant complement of science to perform while Dragon is berthed to ISS.

Yesterday I installed new software on several laptops, so they will be ready to support new science. Today I spent two hours gathering from all over the Station into one single bag all the equipment required for a specific experiment, so that everything will be readily available when those operations start a few weeks from now. And of course Terry and I continue to prepare for the capture of Dragon.

Today was our “offset grapple” practice, a two-hour session in which we could practiced flying the real arm, instead  of the simulator. I’ve talked about “offset grapples” in my L+20, +21 Logbook: check it out, in case you missed it! 

https://plus.google.com/u/0/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/UeZYA3DFrw1

When the last Dragon arrived, Butch performed the actual capture. This time I will be the prime robotic operator, so I will be at the controls of the arm, while Terry will be responsible for communication with the ground, running the procedures and the malfunction cue cards (the latter will hopefully not be needed).

And speaking of malfunctions, on our last “almost-grapple” today we practiced the response to a “safing event” occurring the arm end effector is already over the pin, so very close to pressing the trigger to capture, or even shortly thereafter. The arm will automatically go into a safe mode following a malfunction, making it impossible to command the joints, the end effector or the arm in its entirety.

Luckily, it’s really ‘two arms in one’: granted, there is only one set of beams and joints, but there’s otherwise full redundancy on all the components that allow the arm to function. In order to make use of that redundancy and complete the capture on the backup string, we would have to move from the Cupola to the Lab, where we have a second robotic workstation. On capture day, that second workstation is in a “hot backup” mode, meaning that literally one button press is sufficient to make it prime and put it in control of the arm. Wouldn’t you love to have that kind of redundancy on your car when that red light appears?

Ah, yesterday I also spent some time on my periodic fitness assessment. We do that on our bike, CEVIS, once a month, using a dedicated protocol, while our electrocardiogram is recorded and blood pressure is measured every five minutes. Based on this data, specialists on the ground can make an estimation of our VO2max, which is a commonly used measure of cardiovascular fitness. The typical trend observed in 6-month missions is a significant, quick decrease of VO2max early on and then a slow recovery through the daily workouts on bike and treadmill. And the closer we are to returning to Earth, the more critical it is to exercise, to be ready to face gravity again.

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
 
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From Alana
 
Are you feeling a little bit confused about how to replace onions? Check out my latest article for some safe low FODMAP subsititutes.
#LowFODMAP #FODMAPfriendly #FODMAP #NoOnion #IBShelp  
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The  NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has imaged phantom objects near dead quasars - ethereal green objects which mark the graves of these objects that flickered to life and then faded.

http://sci.esa.int/hubble/55732-hubble-finds-ghosts-of-quasars-past-heic1507/


+Hubble Space Telescope +NASA  #galaxy   #quasars  
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Developers -  Update to OAuth2! 

Parts of the Account Authentication APIs (ClientLogin, AuthSub and OAuth 1.0) were officially deprecated on April 20, 2012 and will be shut down on April 20, 2015

If you use any of the Google Analytics Reporting or Configuration APIs, make sure you’re using OAuth2.0, or upgrade as soon as possible. Here’s the Authentication API migration guide: http://goo.gl/DzFvyc

Read the original announcement on the Google Developers blog: http://goo.gl/YO921L  
Learn more about authorization in the Core Reporting API: http://goo.gl/ACAc69 
And in the Management API: http://goo.gl/PXDQnE 

#GADevs
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Have him in circles
73 people
Stephen Slater-Brown's profile photo
Carlos muñiz's profile photo
Jean Alania's profile photo
Fernando Grados's profile photo
Franca Cavassa's profile photo
Mirella Caffaro-Rore's profile photo
Jodie Garrett's profile photo
Jorge Ugaz's profile photo
Cesar Castro's profile photo
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