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Carl Webb
Works at I was one of the first soldiers to go public with their resistance to the Iraq War
Attended Austin Community College
Lives in Austin, Texas
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Carl Webb
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Discussion  - 
 
Google Fiber + Small Businesses - Breakfast at the Fiber Space

April 29, 2015
7:30 a.m. - 10 a.m. 

Google Fiber Space
201 Colorado Street
Austin Texas 78701

Hello, Austin Small Business Owners!

As you may have heard, Google Fiber is now available for small businesses. To learn more about it, please join us for a special breakfast on April 29, at the Google Fiber Space. Our team will be onsite to answer questions about the product, discuss timelines and help you get signed up. RSVP here so we know you’ll be coming.
 
https://fiber.google.com/cities/austin/events/
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Carl Webb

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Austin Online: Digital Inclusion & Broadband Access

Wednesday, April 22, 2015
12:15pm - 1:30pm

UT Austin
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum
Rm. 3.124

Free lunch provided!

Our digital world is constantly evolving with new technologies and digital tools coming online daily. But for many people, the digital divide is only growing wider. Too many people do not have access to the skills, knowledge or resources necessary to engage in our digital society. But government, nonprofits and the private sector are working together to bridge this digital divide. 

Speakers:
Juanita Budd, Austin Free-Net Executive Director
Parisa Fatehi-Weeks, Google Fiber Community Impact Manager
John Speirs, City of Austin Digital Inclusion Program Coordinator
Chris McConnell, PhD, dissertation on the relationship between social inequality and Internet use in Austin 

Moderator:
Prof. Sherri Greenberg

https://www.facebook.com/events/1582290655389249/
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Carl Webb

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Video that captures violent abuse by police or a government can send shockwaves through a society, but even if it goes viral, it may not stand up in a courtroom as evidence. Hari Sreenivasan reports on how one organization is training citizens around the world to shoot better video when they witness crime, while protecting themselves from becoming targets.
Video that captures violent abuse by police or a government can send shockwaves through a society, but even if it goes viral, it may not stand up in a courtroom as evidence. Hari Sreenivasan reports on how one organization is training citizens around the world to shoot better video when they witness crime, while protecting themselves from becoming targets.
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Google Education on Air is a free online conference about leading for the future and shaping today’s classrooms. This event which will take place on May 8-9 is open to anyone with an interest in education: teachers, administrators, students,parents, school leaders
Join us for a free online conference. You have the best seat in the house (your own!) to learn with other educators. Sign up today to stay informed.
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Carl Webb
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Outside Plant (OSP) Project Manager, Google Fiber - Austin, TX

Google's projects, like our users, span the globe and require managers to keep the big picture in focus. As a Program Manager at Google, you lead complex, multi-disciplinary projects. You plan requirements with internal customers and usher projects through the entire project lifecycle. This includes managing project schedules, identifying risks and clearly communicating goals to project stakeholders. Your projects often span offices, time zones and hemispheres, and it's your job to keep all the players coordinated on the project's progress and deadlines.

Responsibilities
Manage the design and deployment of Google's Fiber to the Home (FTTH) build in a metropolitan area.
Lead a project team within a metropolitan area including vendors and contractors.
Coordinate with city officials, jurisdictional authorities, and utility representatives.
Manage proposals, bids, scope definition, engineering design cycles and design review and approvals for a FTTH network, specifically, the selection of EPC vendors.
Manage vendor scope of work (SOW), project change orders and materials procurement sufficient to meet contractual requirements.


Minimum qualifications
BA/BS degree or equivalent practical experience.
10 years of experience managing large telecommunication, utility or distributed infrastructure construction or implementation projects and project teams with profit and loss responsibility.
Experience in developing requests for proposal (RFPs), scheduling projects, cost engineering, budgeting and forecasting costs, reporting project status and costs, procurement and experience in negotiating with contractors and vendors.
Management experience in driving contractor performance.


Preferred qualifications
BS degree in Construction Management or an engineering field.
10 years of experience with fiber network deployments, including experience with constructing new outside and inside plant fiber infrastructure, and 5 years of experience with FTTH infrastructure.
Experience with Primavera project management system.
Familiar with GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and database management including AutoCAD, ESRI, and shape file functionality.
Working knowledge of inside and outside plant fiber optic network infrastructure, engineering design and construction.
Knowledge of network drawings, route maps and scopes of work and interpreting fiber test results and auditing projects for compliance with scopes of work.


Area

At Google, we're always trying to provide our users with the fastest services possible. Google Fiber works to go the very last mile, providing fiber-optic Internet connections directly to users' homes. We're building one of the fastest networks in America so that users can experience the future of broadband because we know that your Internet connection can never be too fast.

Austin 

We mostly focus on sales and marketing, and like most of Google, we’re growing fast, with new, Texan-sized opportunities opening up all the time.

Learn more about our Austin office 

Program Management 

Lead complex, multi-disciplinary projects and usher them through the entire lifecycle.

Learn more about our Program Management roles

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/27473306
Google's projects, like our users, span the globe and require managers to keep the big picture in focus. As a Program Manager at Google, you lead complex, multi-disciplinary projects. You plan requirements with internal customers and usher projects through the entire project lifecycle. This includes managing project schedules, identifying risks and clearly communicating goals to project stakeholders. Your projects often span offices, time zones a...
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Carl Webb
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
State of the Arts in Austin at Google Fiber Space

May 19, 2015 at 6-8:30 p.m. 

Register online to attend

Future Forum members are invited to join us for an engaging conversation about the intersection of the arts and the Austin economy on Tuesday, May 19 at the cutting-edge Google Fiber Space in downtown Austin.

Confirmed participants include:

Jennifer Chenoweth, Artist and Founder of Generous Art
Robert Faires, Arts Editor at The Austin Chronicle
Austin Nelson, Director of Development and Communications, Co-Lab
Jennifer Ransom Rice, Executive Director of The Texas Cultural Trust
We will discuss how the art scene influences, and is affected by, our local economy and quality of life. After the panel, the conversation will continue at a reception with drinks, appetizers, and mingling.

Google Fiber is located at 201 Colorado Street. We recommend parking in the City Hall garage (301 W. 2nd Street with entry on Lavaca), at the AMLI downtown garage (201 Lavaca), or using metered street parking.

This evening is co-sponsored by Texas Cultural Trust, Generous Art, and Dripping Springs Vodka. Please register online if you plan to attend.

http://www.lbjlibrary.org/events/state-of-the-arts-in-austin
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Carl Webb

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Local Guides know local places like no other.
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Carl Webb
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Austin Online: Digital Inclusion & Broadband Access

Wednesday, April 22, 2015
12:15pm - 1:30pm

UT Austin LBJ School of Public Affairs
Sid Richardson Hall, Rm. 3.124
2300 Red River St
Austin, TX 78712

Free lunch provided!

Our digital world is constantly evolving with new technologies and digital tools coming online daily. But for many people, the digital divide is only growing wider. Too many people do not have access to the skills, knowledge or resources necessary to engage in our digital society. But government, nonprofits and the private sector are working together to bridge this digital divide. 

Speakers:
Juanita Budd, Austin Free-Net Executive Director
Parisa Fatehi-Weeks, Google Fiber Community Impact Manager
John Speirs, City of Austin Digital Inclusion Program Coordinator
Chris McConnell, PhD, dissertation on the relationship between social inequality and Internet use in Austin 

Moderator:
Prof. Sherri Greenberg

https://www.facebook.com/events/1582290655389249/
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Carl Webb
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
The Most Important Decision the FCC Made Last Week Wasn't on Net Neutrality

By David Dayen  @ddayen

Last week’s Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruling codifying the principles of net neutrality is a victory for grassroots organizing. But in 20 years, we might be talking more about another FCC decision made last Thursday.

In a party-line 3-2 ruling, the FCC pre-empted state laws in Tennessee and North Carolina that sought to prevent two community broadband networks from delivering high-quality, high-speed Internet access as a public utility. Overall, 19 states have laws banning or restricting community broadband, but the FCC’s ruling, if it survives court challenges, all but disintegrates them, allowing any municipality to offer a “public option” for broadband access. The ruling has major implications for promoting competition, increasing broadband speeds, and perhaps even making Internet access look more like electricity.

Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Wilson, North Carolina, southern cities far from the dominant financial, media, and governance corridors on the coasts, both provide publicly owned community broadband. Wilson’s offering, Greenlight Community Broadband, and Chattanooga Gig both offer “triple play” service (phone, television and Internet) and speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second (Gbps), which is roughly 30 times the average Internet speed in the United States (some put the number at 200 times higher). 

The 1 Gbps service costs Chattanooga residents just $70 a month, and slower plans which still outpace the national average are even cheaper (Wilson’s menu of options are somewhat more expensive). City-owned agencies in Wilson and Chattanooga manage the networks. And they’re not alone: The Institute for Local Self-Reliance reports that more than 40 communities in 13 states offer public, ultra-fast broadband. They happen to be mostly clustered in rural, Republican communities that telecom giants have abandoned, showing that getting fast-loading YouTube cat videos is a priority that transcends political party.

But in far more communities across the country, Internet users have virtually no choice of service provider, a situation that would grow worse if Comcast and Time Warner Cable merge. FCC Commissioner Tom Wheeler said in a speech last September that three-quarters of all American households have “no competitive choice” for high-speed broadband. Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner have effectively divvied up the entire country, forcing consumers to use their products if they want access to the Web. 

This lack of competition has kept Internet prices up and speeds down. The United States has fallen behind the world in broadband speeds, as Americans often pay more for less. Monopolies set their prices higher because they can, and neglect the relative decrepitude of their infrastructure to save on capital costs, because they know their customers have nowhere else to go. Countries in Europe and elsewhere force broadband companies who lay down infrastructure to lease part of the pipe to rivals. But this concept, known as “unbundling,” is basically dead in the United States (although there’s a chance that net neutrality rules will open this up again). 

As an illustrative example, Verizon’s 500-megabit-per-second plans in New York, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.—half the speed of networks in Seoul, Hong Kong, and Tokyo, not to mention Chattanooga—cost around $300 a month, significantly more than abroad. In fact, the only exceptions to this rule in America come from either cities equipped with Google Fiber or community broadband cities.

Most community broadband networks are fiber optic, which the major Internet service providers have been slow to install, citing infrastructure costs. The potential for communities to switch to a community network could be just the spur the telecoms need to invest in upgraded networks, or else get left behind. Community broadband has also been shown to keep prices down through competition; in Wilson, Time Warner broadband prices are as much as 40 percent lower than in nearby cities like Raleigh. 

Municipalities have financed fiber rollouts through revenue bonds and savings from canceling leased services. Those who have already made the switch are testaments to the potential economic rewards. Online travel company Expedia recently moved a major call center to Springfield, Missouri, a city with community broadband, creating 900 jobs. Chattanooga cites its gigabit service as crucial to attracting an Amazon distribution center and a Volkswagen auto assembly plant. Lafayette, Louisiana is being called the Silicon Bayou, bringing in multiple tech firms on the promise of its 21st-century digital infrastructure. 

Telecoms have reacted to this wave of community broadband in ways you would expect from politically powerful, deep-pocketed corporations. First they sued the pants off any municipality trying to build their own network. Then they used their clout in state legislatures to restrict their reach. In Tennessee, only municipal electric companies can provide broadband, and only in the markets they serve. In North Carolina, community broadband networks cannot jump county lines. States like Missouri and Texas ban communities from building their own fiber-optic networks. 

Chairman Wheeler and his Democratic colleagues overturned the restrictions in North Carolina and Tennessee because they found them inconsistent with the FCC’s mandate, explicitly authorized by Congress in the 1996 Telecommunications Act, to “remove barriers” to deploy high-speed Internet “to all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion.” The Republican commissioners questioned whether the agency had the authority to shoot down the laws, and you can expect legal action. Pre-butting the inevitable claims that decision damages state’s rights, community broadband advocates are already calling the Chattanooga and Wilson orders victories for local choice. 

If the order holds, it presents real promise for a city-by-city public option for broadband. Net neutrality ensures that the worst practices of telecom monopolies—charging for content to deliver across their pipes—won’t happen. But the public option, as Harvard law professor and former White House official Susan Crawford explained last April in an interview with Vox, could remove the monopoly itself, and the tendency among those corporate behemoths to deliver expensive, substandard service and leave many communities behind. “Just as we have a postal service that's a public option for communications in the form of mail, we also need public options in every city for very high-capacity, very high-speed fiber internet access,” Crawford said. 

The Roosevelt Institute’s Mike Konczal has written compellingly about the necessary role of public options in the welfare state, where government does not just provide coupons to purchase private, for-profit services, but actively delivers the services themselves. They can often generate better outcomes for less money than private enterprise. Broadband is a perfect example. You can make the case that maximizing supply through direct public/private competition will ensure quality, affordable access to a service that has become almost as critical to the modern household as electricity.

In fact, wiring the country for power, particularly rural areas the utility companies neglected, was a hallmark of the New Deal. In 2009, $7.2 billion in federal stimulus money was earmarked for building out broadband, and while more funds won’t pour out of the GOP-controlled Congress anytime soon, facilitating community broadband is about as close as we can get to that New Deal spirit of ensuring equal access to opportunity and economic competitiveness. And in this case, not just rural outposts, but all of us, can benefit.

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/121188/fcc-community-broadband-ruling-could-transform-internet-access
Chattanooga, Tennessee's internet is faster and cheaper than yours—and will remain that way.
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Hot dang, that's great! The Texas lege put the kibosh on Austin's municipal broadband initiative in 1995, and the issue has been ping-ponging through the courts ever since.

Texas was early in that game, thanks in part to the fact that Michael Levy, publisher of Texas Monthly, used to be roommates with the guy who was Southwestern Bell CEO at the time.

Levy then managed to get "a little ole amendment" into the Texas Telecommunications Act of 1995 (HB 2128) that was aimed directly at Austin's broadband effort. He even bragged about it in Neal Spelce's newsletter, broadside for the Metropolitan Club gang that actually runs the joint.

If you want to know why we're stuck with crappy 3rd-world private broadband, you can thank the proprietor of a second-rate print publication who was terrified of the digital writing on the wall and made a second career out of dissing all things City of Austin.
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Carl Webb
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Municipal Fiber and the Digital Divide: A Modest Proposal

This is a guest post by Angela Siefer and Bill Callahan.

http://citiesspeak.org/2015/03/27/municipal-fiber-and-the-digital-divide-a-modest-proposal/

With a little effort, city leaders could develop account-sharing models and policies that encourage smart, grassroots solutions to the affordable broadband problem at little or no public cost. (Getty Images)

The explosion of interest in community-owned fiber on the part of elected officials and technology leaders has created an opportunity that few have noticed: cities could leverage these investments to help lower the barriers to home Internet access that still keep low-income, less educated and older citizens out of the digital mainstream. This could be easily accomplished, at it would cost cities practically nothing.

Here’s how: cities could allow neighboring households and community groups to share that terrific bandwidth – and its cost – by using community-owned fiber to power grassroots Wi-Fi networks.

Almost all Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and community-owned fiber networks employ Terms of Service language that prohibits customers from extending their networks across property lines to share access with their neighbors. City-owned networks can expand the possibilities for affordable broadband access in disadvantaged neighborhoods simply by changing their Terms of Service to allow network sharing.

As demonstrated by the rise of Google Fiber, the advent of city-owned networks selling 100 megabit or gigabit Internet access for $75, $90 or $100 a month raises the competitive ante on broadband speed and price for traditional cable and telecommunications ISPs. This is great news for tech-savvy middle- and upper-income residents, as well as for data-dependent businesses and community anchor institutions like libraries and hospitals.

But in many city neighborhoods, we’re faced with the stubborn fact that large numbers of mostly low-income citizens still don’t have home Internet access at any speed.

The American Community Survey for 2013 reports data for 575 U.S. “places” with more than 15,000 households. 282 of these communities – nearly half – reported no fixed broadband connections (defined as any connection beyond dial-up or mobile) in at least 30 percent of their homes. 151 reported that at least one fourth of their households have no home Internet access of any kind – no dial-up, no mobile access; nothing. Not surprisingly, these Internet-free households are concentrated in low-income neighborhoods where residents are least able to afford the $30, $40 or $50 monthly cost of an Internet service subscription.

Of course, low-income households that can’t afford current DSL or cable Internet services have little to gain from the availability of fiber broadband service that costs twice as much.

But suppose that cost could be split among five, ten or twenty users?

One of the great value propositions of Big Bandwidth is its shareability. There’s not much a single household can do with a gigabit connection that couldn’t be accomplished with a tenth (100 mbps), a twentieth (50 mbps) or even a fortieth (25 mbps) of that capacity. But put that gigabit connection into an office, a call center or library where forty, fifty or more users share it, and its value becomes apparent. All the users sharing that gigabit start connecting to the Internet at speeds far greater than their “shares” (because of how network routers optimize and balance packet streams) – and at a total cost far below the equivalent number of single-user accounts.

The economic advantage of networked access sharing has been so obvious for so long that no business or organization would even think about buying individual Internet service accounts for employees working at the same location – and no ISPs would waste time trying to sell them. Since home broadband took root a decade ago, the same has become true of households; we provide for our family members’ need to connect simultaneously in different parts of our homes with routers, network cables and Wi-Fi – not by subscribing to multiple Internet service accounts.

ISPs are happy to encourage all this access sharing within their customers’ premises. But they draw the line – a hard, bright line written into their Terms of Service – when it comes to letting customers share their network with the neighbors. The reasons are commercial, not technical; ISPs make money on account charges, and they don’t want their customers to get ideas about avoiding them. It’s a profit-driven business model.

But municipal broadband networks don’t have to follow that model.

Over the past eight years, cheap, modular “open mesh” Wi-Fi devices have transformed the possibilities for community networking at the very local level – the apartment building, housing estate or city block. Any building owner or group of neighbors can acquire a few of these devices for less than a hundred dollars each, distribute them at 100-200 foot intervals around a target area, connect at least one of them to the Internet, and start distributing robust, secure Wi-Fi Internet throughout the area.

Open mesh networks are providing public or “house” Internet access in thousands of hotels, apartment complexes, campuses and campgrounds. These networks are also found in some public housing estates and high-rises, installed by local housing authorities who understand the importance of affordable Internet for tenants’ income and education prospects.

There’s no technical reason why block clubs and community organizations in lower-income neighborhoods can’t use this same cheap, off-the-shelf technology to create truly affordable local broadband access, by sharing connections and costs among neighboring households. But unlike the people running apartment buildings, campgrounds and hotels, community residents will almost always find that Terms of Service restrict them from sharing bandwidth with their neighbors, at any price.

Municipal broadband providers can solve this problem with the stroke of a pen, simply by allowing neighborhood account sharing in their Terms of Service.

With a little effort, city leaders could take the next step: Working with neighborhood leaders and digital inclusion advocates to develop account-sharing models and policies that encourage smart, grassroots solutions to the affordable broadband problem at little or no public cost.

About the Authors:

Angela Siefer is a digital inclusion consultant and an adjunct fellow at the Pell Center at Salve Regina University. She envisions a world in which all members of society have the skills and the resources to use the Internet for the betterment of themselves and their communities.

Bill Callahan is a Cleveland-based community organizer who has worked for the past twenty years on grassroots training and access strategies to close the digital divide. He currently serves as the director of Connect Your Community, a collaborative of community-based digital inclusion advocates in greater Cleveland and Detroit.

http://citiesspeak.org/2015/03/27/municipal-fiber-and-the-digital-divide-a-modest-proposal/
This is a guest post by Angela Siefer and Bill Callahan. With a little effort, city leaders could develop account-sharing models and policies that encourage smart, grassroots solutions to the affor...
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Carl Webb

General Discussion  - 
 
THE DIVERSITY EXPO AT SXSW

FRIDAY, MARCH 13 AT 6:00PM
 
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 
1165 ANGELINA STREET 
AUSTIN, TX 78702

One of the most pressing issues facing the technology industry is the diversity gap. From Google to Facebook to Amazon to Intuit to Apple, tech companies recently released their statistics on the racial and gender makeup of their workforces and the percentages are in the single digits.
 
In answering that challenge, MVMT50, in conjunction with MANDO RAYO COLLECTIVE and AUSTIN SOCIAL CIRCLE are looking to implement the first ever DIVERSITY EXPO focused on African American and Latino/a talent during SXSW Interactive.
 
SXSW Interactive attracts the world’s most innovative and talented minority tech and creative professionals. The DIVERSITY EXPO will – for the first time – allow these highly skilled job seekers, bloggers, marketers and entrepreneurs the opportunity to explore new employment opportunities and make connections and engage in strategic conversations.

http://diversityexpoaustin.com
One of the most pressing issues facing the technology industry is the diversity gap. From Google to Facebook to Amazon to Intuit to Apple, tech companies recently released their statistics on the racial and gender makeup of their workforces and the percentages are in the single digits.   In answering that challenge, MVMT50,  in conjunction with MANDO RAYO COLLECTIVE and AUSTIN SOCIAL CIRCLE are looking to implement the first ever DIVERSITY ...
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Education
  • Austin Community College
    biology, 2008 - 2008
  • St. Philip's College
    nursing, 1994 - 1994
  • Delgado Community College
    nursing, 1992 - 1993
  • West Los Angeles College
    general studies, 1983 - 1983
  • Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
    electronics, 1994 - 1994
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November 6
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Introduction

I'm originally fron New Orleans, La but I've been living in Austin, TX off and on since 1995. Before that I lived in San Antonio where I trained as a Healthcare Specialist in the US Army.

I was one of the first soldiers to go public with their resistance to the Iraq War. Iraq Veterans Against the War formed in July 2004 which was the same month I was told I'd be going to Iraq. I became an IVAW member in January 2005.

I dropped out of school in 1982. Just before turning 17 a recruiter convinced the me to join the military. I left my home in New Orleans and spent 7 years on and off active duty between 1982 to 1994, which included two overseas tours. One in Korea and one in Germany. In 1993, while serving in the Louisiana Army National Guard I got the opportunity to train in San Antonio, TX at Fort Sam Houston. First as a combat medic and then as a licensed practical nurse. After my discharge in December of 1994 I decided to stay in Texas and work in the health care industry.

In September of 1995 I moved to Austin, TX. In August of 2001 I enlisted in the Texas Army National Guard for three years and the very next month 911 happened. I was a medic assigned to the 249th Main Support Battalion in Austin, TX. I got stop-loss orders in July of 2004 right before his very last drill. I was told that I was to be involuntarily extended and reassigned to the 56th Brigade Combat Team as part of the 36th Infantry Division and deploy with this unit to Iraq.

According to the army's stop loss policy they can make null and void any contractual obligation you have with the military and extends your service in the military against your will. Some refer to it as a back door draft. An activist from Austin Against War got the Austin Chronicle to print an article titled Jail, Exile, or Iraqabout my situation as an anti-war activist being ordered to war. And the very next day KTBC-TV, our local Fox News affiliate, requested an interview. The week I was supposed to report for active duty I announced that I was having a goodbye party. Most of the guest didn't know it but instead of reporting for duty I'd plan to run away. On the day I was to report to Fort Hood, TX some friends of mine in Veterans For Peace hid me at their house and bought me a bus ticket the next day. I went to Tennessee to stay with a friend.

I had decided not to leave the country because I didn't want to live indefinitely in exile. My plan was to hide out until my military unit dropped me from it's roster. Then I was going to turn my self over to the USADIP(United States Army Deserter Information Point) at Fort Knox. Since deserters are no longer assigned to a unit I hoped to just get kicked out or do jail time. Either would be better than going to Iraq. But to my surprise my unit didn't drop me from the rolls so I was never entered into the [Wanted Person File] of the FBI National Crime Information Center. So I went to New York and spent the next year traveling around doing anti-war activism.

I gave interviews to newspapers, magazines, and TV and radio stations. I stayed on the East Coast until Hurricane Katrina forced me back down south to look for my missing family in New Orleans. After about two years of desertion I was kicked out of the military. I think my decision to go public with my struggle helped to pressure the military to release me in August 2006. While I was on the run in Tennessee someone made a video that was sent to Amy Goodman and she invited me to be on her [Democracy Now!] TV show. So on March 15, 2005, just before the protest of the third year of the war, I was on a show called Three U.S. Soldiers Refusing to Fight Speak Out Against the Iraq War. She had me on again about six months later for a show called Missing in New Orleans: Voices of Those Seeking Loved Ones. The video that was made by MonkeyRay Productions while I was on the run in Tennessee is now on KLRU's Docubloggers which is a video blog on our local PBS station's website in Austin. I hope to be an example for others.

It's been a few years since I updated this but I guess one of the more recent important changes has been my expulsion from IVAW though I'm still a current member of VFP.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Carl_Webb

------------------------------------------

I'm involved in Public Circles Project

Who are your favorite Google+ users? Help them to be seen! And don't miss a sweet incentive for you (it's described before the end of the post). 

------------------------------------------

Learn about the Public Circles Project:
https://plus.google.com/111873853137122484021/posts/PtKotY6hLGg
------------------------------------------

Public Circles Project was created by Jarek Klimek to help visitors to leave your profile in a way that works for people you admire and even for you! Put the names of people you admire on your Google+ About page! So, the project gives a nice additional exposure to the people you like.

Google+ users I recommend:


Bragging rights
I deserted from the military and refused to fight the Iraqi people!
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    Marxist, present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Austin, Texas
Previously
New Olreans, Louisiana - Korea - Germany - Mexico
Carl Webb's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Inequity in the Technopolis: Race, Class, Gender, and the Digital Divide...
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Identity Crisis: The Israeli ID System | Visualizing Palestine
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Help SnagFilms reach the Promised Land in the Webbys People's Voice. Vote with me.

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Google-eBay merger? Alibaba's growth may make it worth pondering - Silic...
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As Google Inc. grapples with competing in the e-commerce and payments industries and eBay Inc. deals with challenges to spin off its PayPal

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Página oficial del Patio del danzón, y de la Danzonera SierraMadre.

Budget Mobile Lifeline
plus.google.com

Lifeline Cell Phone | FREE cell phone and 250 FREE minutes

Open Austin - Google Groups
groups.google.com

happy data innovation day, Chip Rosenthal, 6:07 AM. please join our meetup group, Chip Rosenthal, 1/16/14. next meetup: Jan 27, ATXFloods, C

That's what Rudys do!
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Rudy Malveaux, proud East Austin resident, political activist and filmmaker suffered a stroke the day after Christmas leaving his left side

I've been going to Casey's since 1995 when I moved to Austin. As a native of New Orleans I can confirm they are the REAL DEAL!
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
I highly recommend Tetris Cleaning Service if you need to remove stains from your upholstery.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Via Julia Foree 2014 Chair, North Lamar Contact Team: Objective P.2 Improve the Access to and Safety of Brownie Playground I met last Friday morning with new park maintenance staff and manager Jeff. By the middle of July they have committed to: mow a wide swath on both sides of path that comes from Longspur to keep it passable. reroute path so it does not cross onto retention pond area (which is private land) but stays within park, crossing through the creekbed. remove the tall vegetation just to the south of the Brownie Dead end to provide a clear line of sight. remove fence sections located wholly within the park i.e. the fence just to the south of the playscape. (but not those on the boundaries, so not the one the path currently passes through.) repair the picnic table and play structure and replace the non-working water fountain with one which has a dog watering bowl. Please plan to attend the upcoming Contact Team meeting (July 12 at 1pm at the YMCA meeting room 1 on Rundberg) to discuss future improvements you would like to see to Brownie park and its extension. The Brownie Addition will likely change shape as IDEA builds their school. IDEA School, the new owner of the large tract of land to the south of Brownie Park is in discussions with us, Parks and Recreation, Public Works and Site Plan Review about the possibility of connecting Brownie Drive and Longspur Drive via road. This would remove existing parkland, which they would need to replace with some of their own land. The completion of this road would provide the neighborhood children who attend IDEA with a safe route to school remaining inside the neighborhood. The only other entrance to the school property is from I-35. Please let me know your thoughts. Julia Foree 2014 Chair, North Lamar Contact Team
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Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
51 reviews
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I had flautas and charro beans and it was great!
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
I took some of my military dress uniforms there and they did a great job!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Doing a great job at providing skill training to low income people.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago