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Carin Bondar
Works at National Geographic Wild
Attended University of British Columbia
Lives in Chilliwack
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Carin Bondar

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Enchanting look at seadragon courting and parental behavior. Learning experience enhanced by David Attenborough!



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These animals always remind me of how incredible other forms of life could be on other planets.
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Carin Bondar

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PUNS! Via mental_floss


You're about to stumble into the looking-glass world of “contronyms”—words that are their own antonyms.
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Sixty years ago, this man changed medicine forever. Today, we are grateful and amazed at such talent and heart. Via +ScienceAlert
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Now we patent then open source the IP.  Or sell to Google and they do it.
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It's interesting to see how succession occurs in Chernobyl.




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Don't you need bacteria/fungus for decay? Radioactivity hurts them? Who would have thunk? Glad people are immune.
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Cheers to everyday discoveries! 
Even when it's been dead for 110 million years, a shiver of fear might be expected on encountering the remains of a predator whose jaw is longer than many people. Robert Hacon was spraying weeds on his property in western Queensland when he noticed something sticking out of the ground. Drought in the area had killed the grass and made previously hidden rocks visible. Hacon saw light reflecting off the bone, but “thought they were muscle shells so...
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Reading these articles makes me wish I had a time machine so that I could see these creatures firsthand. The closest I've come is a Disney ride :/. Maybe soon there will be a virtual reality environment to showcase these creatures.
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+Rick Durrett just finished his talk at the Evolutionary Game Theory meeting at Ohio State University. You can follow his (and other talks) following +Ruchira Datta's stream. But if you want to know more about his work, here's the link to one interesting paper.
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Have her in circles
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Carin Bondar

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+Marielena Rosario CHECK THIS OUT
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More fiction than fact. 
The internet is a testament to how much we love animals. When people aren’t busy looking up cute cat videos, they are sharing random facts about their favorite animal. There is just one problem, though – a lot of these “facts” are plain wrong. 1. A Duck’s quack doesn’t echo
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The article gets some "facts" wrong too. Red is not used because people thought that bulls attacked red (as attested by the matador's assistants who use their capes which are faded pink on one side and yellow on the other).

It's rather a chicken and the egg thing... the human spectators will certainly be more sensitive to red, and so it is used to denote the matador. The whole theory that "bulls attack red"  probably came after this custom was established.
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Chameleon hatchling!


Super cute or kind of creepy? You decide!
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Wow. I love your posts. 
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Transitional fossils are exhilarating finds but sometimes they leave is with more questions than answers. 
A new feathered dinosaur unearthed from Jurassic rocks in northeastern China had long bones protruding from its wrists that may have supported wing membranes—like the kind you’d find in bats and flying squirrels, not birds. Yi qi, as the critter is called, is an extraordinary example of early evolutionary experiments with flight. Although ultimately, it may have been a failed experiment. The findings were published in Nature this week. 
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I presume you meant "leave us with more questions than answers"?

That said this fossil reminds me of some of the ones I saw in "Vertebrate Palaeontology" by Michael Benton (I used this as text in an undergraduate course years ago):
http://www.amazon.com/Vertebrate-Palaeontology-MICHAEL-BENTON/dp/0412738104/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1430500850&sr=8-7&keywords=vertebrate+palaeontology

We are starting to find a lot of interesting evolutionary dead ends as the fossil record continues to expand.  Some big questions remain though on the authenticity of some of these fossils; there was one from a Chinese site not long ago that was eventually shown to have been significantly altered. 
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Hummingbird close-up via ScienceDump
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Beautiful bird
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Caterpillar with erupting tentacles? Check this video out! Via +National Geographic


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Clearly a defense mechanism. Probably mimics something really nasty in that biome.
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Have her in circles
210,507 people
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Work
Occupation
I write, blog, produce cool videos and such.
Employment
  • National Geographic Wild
    Host/Presenter, 2012 - present
  • Earth Touch Productions
    Host/Presenter, 2012 - present
  • Discovery Worldwide
    Presenter, 2012 - present
  • Scientific American Blogger, Freelancer
    writer/blogger/filmmaker, present
  • ScienceAlert
    BioStarlet, 2012 - 2013
  • The David Suzuki Foundation
    Writer/Videographer, 2012 - 2012
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Chilliwack
Previously
Palmerston North - Vancouver - Victoria - Mainz
Story
Tagline
Biologist with a Twist
Introduction
I spend a good deal of time thinking about biology - social behavior, evolution, sexual behavior and all sorts of weird and wonderful stuff.  

I'm an aspiring foodie - love great food and wine, love to be an experimental chef.  
Bragging rights
Proud Canadian! Mom of 4, dedicated to family and science.
Education
  • University of British Columbia
    PhD Biology, 2001 - 2005
  • University of Victoria
    MSc Biology, 1999 - 2001
  • Simon Fraser University
    BSc Biology, 1995 - 1999
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Tyson is extremely easy to work with, and he listens to EXACTLY what his clients want. I love his work and am completely happy with my experience! #recommend
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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