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Cara Schulz
Works at PNC News
Lived in Minneapolis, MN
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Cara Schulz

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Don't let organizations limit debates to only two candidates - demand  if a candidate is ON THE BALLOT, they are IN THE DEBATE.
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Cara Schulz's profile photoWilliam D.'s profile photo
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If Gary Johnson is on NC's ticket again, I'll show up to vote for him, but mostly just to get one more number out there than a belief I'll make a difference.
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Wendell Fitzgerald's profile photoNicholas Ritter's profile photo
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"Apparently you do not care about people who do not own real estate."

This is rather a leap, sir. I think I understand how you have arrived at this conclusion, based upon one particular point of Cara's platform, but I also think that your conclusion is based upon ungrounded assumptions. There are two things to keep in mind:

1) This is only one part of Cara's platform, not the entirety. Before assuming that she is in favor of shifting the burden of taxation to non-homeowners, it might be more prudent to ask her where she is looking at to replace that revenue.

2) You do not know Cara. Granted, this is through no fault of yours, but it seems to me that you are making assessments of her character and  motives based upon a very small and incomplete set of data. I do happen to know Cara, and based upon my knowledge of her, the assertion that she does not care about people who do not own real estate could not be further from the truth.

Having been an apartment-dweller making a low wage for several years in my youth, I agree with your point that shifting the tax burden to income or sales taxes unduly handicaps people in similarly difficult financial straits.
I did find your thoughts on possible other sources of tax revenue to be interesting, particularly taxing the ownership of land as opposed to improvements upon it.
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ARE YOU A FOOD CRIMINAL?

"If people let government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny."—Thomas Jefferson

Federal, state, and local laws combine to make criminals out of most of us - even for things like growing tomatoes and giving a hungry person our homemade lunch. I'll work to roll back absurd local ordinances that make common decency a criminal act or punish you for planting vegetables in your front yard.

https://www.facebook.com/caraforburnsville caraschulz.com
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Scott Swain's profile photoRobert Hirsch's profile photo
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I agree, recently, that having an FDA is an extremely inefficient and unreliable method of providing "safety". What we all want is the same thing, a third party review of the science.

Part if this comes from science itself, through repetition and verification, publication and review. But I too would like to see a UL version for medicine. I would like to see a stamp, voluntarily placed by corporation to meet the market desire for safety. Different certs can compete for reputation as they do now for other safety aspects.

Greed is a valid remark and observation. But it's too hard to figure out how it comes into play, is it by fooling customers or is it more a result of corporate-government symbiosis making meeting actual customer needs irrelevant?
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So this chick with Celiacs is going to drink an awesome craft beer

No joke. I'm going to crack open this APA and drink it down all casual like. And I'm going to enjoy every drop.

I haven't had beer very often, once I had to go #GlutenFree ... and the few gf beers I've had have bern ermented vomit with soy sprinkles on top. Not tastey.

This gf beer from Burning Brothers? Freakng amazing. Nice crisp, hoppy APA - can't tell it's gf. At all.

I think they only sell in Minnesota right now, but that should change.
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Te-Erika Patterson's profile photoSean Holt's profile photoCara Schulz's profile photoshailesh verma's profile photo
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I like it
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I....ummmm...yeah. I'll just put this out there for you.
You can thank me later.
New Zealand's national rugby team, the All Blacks, celebrated in a very special way after winning the Hong Kong Sevens tournament on Sunday.
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Cara Schulz's profile photoKaren Conlin's profile photoMichael Nielsen's profile photo
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Elected officials shouldn't live in an echo chamber.

Here's a clip from the Burnsville City Council Candidates Forum. I had a 102 fever with the flu (Oh Joy!) Running for office has been a weird, fun, and sometimes frustrating ride. I'm up against two VERY entrenched incumbents who bring new meaning to the term "cronyism." They spent most of the forum complimenting one another and asking people to vote for both of them because they're such good friends and think just alike. I'm campaigning hard, going door to door. We'll see what happen on November 4th.

caraschulz.com
www.facebook.com/caraforburnsville
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Jeremy “SerJermzalot” Simmons's profile photoCara Schulz's profile photoDaniel Lemire's profile photoAnanta Androscoggin's profile photo
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Sounds like they're the types who tend to have several "bodies" buried in hidden places around town. Kinda goes hand-in-hand with cronyism.
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The Industrial Revolution's Effect on Creating Public Education

Before the Industrial Revolution education was private. But the IR brought about a change in needs because now everything was standardized on the assembly line. So two types of workers were needed - the worker standing in the line who needed to be about to read, write, and do basic arithmetic (sound familiar?) to do his job - and a smaller groups of managers who would be better trained and able to make limited decisions.

It would take too long and was cost-prohibitive for factory owners to train workers and managers themselves...so a group of industrialists (Henry Ford, John Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, etc) began to push for and create the modern public education system. To say these men had the political power to do something like this is an understatement.

Then, as now, public education focuses on how to teach your kids the 3 R's - reading, 'riting, and 'rithmetic. They do get a bit of liberal arts thrown in there, but neither STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) nor critical thinking (Socratic method which teaches through logic and questioning everything and not accepting things on face value) are a focus. Unlike "prepatory" private schools, both then and now, who mirror image this focus.

In public school, kids are put into an assembly line. They are grouped by age rather than skills and everyone receives a standardized curriculum. They're a widget with overworked and understaffed teachers in place of line workers. (How can we expect teachers to work miracles in this situation??) Every year kids are given a battery of standardized tests and if they pass, they move to the next level. Classes were (and are) divided into set time periods which are dismissed by a bell, just like on an assembly line. The curriculum is set up into "credit hours" which used to be called Carnegie Units. After the public school finished producing literate workers ready for the assembly line, the top students went to college to learn skills for management.

Our current public education system was designed and built to produce factory workers. And it has done an excellent job. There are pros and cons to this and a major pro is movement between economic classes. But we no longer need factory workers in such large numbers.

And now we have another shift in what companies need from their workers. Now we need workers to have some level of critical thinking skills, but our current system just wasn't set up for that. It was set up as an assembly line to turn out interchangeable cogs with standardized skills.

Just like in the IR, industry leaders believe it is too costly and time consuming to train workers in the way they wish them to be trained. So over the past 3 years Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Oracle have been meeting with President Obama about how education needs to change.

Education WILL change in the US. It has to because the needs of our economy is changing. How it will change and what it will look like - well...that's the question, isn't it?

But it wasn't created for the benefit of kids, it was created for our economic needs. And it won't change to benefit the kids, it will do so because our economic needs are changing. If it does end up benefiting our kids, that will be a by-product and one brought about by some seriously dedicated teachers.
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robert elder's profile photoNiki Whiting's profile photoPaul Gowan's profile photo
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There are serious flaws with this piece of writing in terms of historical accuracy.
Industrialists and the Industrial Revolution are two different things. There is an historical gap that needs to be properly filled.


Actually, Corporations need to take a much greater responsibility for the education of their workers in modern society and not offload it onto government or the public.

"The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution

"...a group of industrialists (Henry Ford, John Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, etc) began to push for and create the modern public education system. "

Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947)

John Davison Rockefeller Sr. (July 8, 1839 – May 23, 1937)
"Rockefeller was also the founder of both the University of Chicago and Rockefeller University and funded the establishment of Central Philippine University in the Philippines."

Andrew Carnegie ... November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919)
"In 1900, Carnegie gave $2 million to start the Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT) at Pittsburgh and the same amount in 1902 to found the Carnegie Institution at Washington, D.C. He later contributed more to these and other schools. CIT is now known as Carnegie Mellon University after it merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research. Carnegie also served on the Board of Cornell University."

John Pierpont "J.P." Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913)
Pg. 58 - graduate schools gifted primarily by J.P. Morgan and his partners
http://web.archive.org/web/20020207051515/http://www.bfi.org/education_automation.htm




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What should government do when many people ignore a law & there's no injury or damage? There's two approaches to take. Decide that all of you are the problem and take steps to force compliance OR take a look at the rule and see if it's necessary or should be modified in some way. Which do you think is the more needed, common sense approach?
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Derek Anderson's profile photoJohn C. Reid's profile photo
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If no one is injured then it is technically a moot point due to Corpus Delicti.

EDIT: I spell things wrong when I am on my phone. What I had before was more like cease the body . . . eww.
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There is a very false binary idea being presented that people are falling for. The idea that the only way to care for your neighbor, if they are in need, is to have the government do it. Anything else means you're a horrible person and Jesus hates you.

I'm much closer to the flip side on this. If YOU can't be bothered to give people food, to give them blankets and mittens, to smile and talk to them and treat them with dignity and instead you leave it to the government... YOU are the one who needs to do a morality check on yourself. As far as I know, Jesus didn't tell people to leave it up to Judean administration to care for those in need. He told people to get off their butts and get their hands dirty while they open their hearts.

Delphi also tells us to help those in need, directly, and as often as we can, with respect. Most religions and nonreligious ethical systems say the same thing.

This cartoon is an excellent example of how we have made it ethically superior to totally abdicate our responsibility to care for one another. 
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shailesh verma's profile photoHeather Johnson's profile photoAdam Lund's profile photoDaniel Benskin's profile photo
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+Theodore Minick +T Thorn Coyle It looks like you two are mostly talking about the same things, but could communicate more effectively with a few substitutions:

Market <-> Community
Trade <-> Collaboration
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Attention Star Wars Geeks

You know you want this. 
Yes! Luke's favorite warm-me-up, mounted and ready to hang on the wall. Made from a used, recycled action figure with a soft, faux suede pad just behind the head. The plaque is lightweight wood making it easy to hang. The back comes complete with felt and a metal hanger. Also, the plague is covered in luxurious 100% leather - very classy! Size: 8" wide x 13 1/2" high x 6" deep.

If he does Jar Jar, it shall be MINE!
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I don't use Mozilla because it crashes. I don't use Explorer because I'm not a total moron. Sending a questionnaire to senior management on their personal and religious views is NOT how I choose my web browser. Know why? Because it's none of my freaking business, that's why.

And OK Cupid? You have zero, and I mean ZERO, moral high ground. The misogynistic, sexually violent, and harassing crap you allow to go down on your site? Yeah.... slow clap ...you're a real hero.
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Arthur “TheAlchemyst” Gwynne's profile photoApril Christie Bodner's profile photo
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So +Justen Robertson am I hearing correctly that, rather than have the power and responsibility to defend yourself from mean words, you would prefer others to do it for you? Are you not worried about the choices that will be made for you, as to what you can see/hear and to what you can show/say?
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Story
Introduction
Journalist.  Glamper.  Libertarian.  Foodie. 
Bragging rights
I don't have a single tattoo.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Minneapolis, MN - Zaragoza, Spain - Fort Dodge, Iowa - Austin, Minnesota - Fremont, Nebraska
Work
Occupation
Managing Editor for PNC News. On G+, I write about politics, religion, weight, and age - but throw in the occasional post about food. I'm married, have an adult son, and no tattoos. Chair of the Executive Committee for International Pagan Coming Out Day. Former President of ISES (International Special Events Society) Minneapolis-St Paul
Employment
  • PNC News
    Managing Editor, present
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Birthday
August 29
Relationship
Married
I'm pro-vaccine but any Dr who says they will report you for neglecting for asking to spread immunization shots out over a longer period has forgotten his oath to "First, do not harm." Children in foster care are far, far more likely to experience true physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and neglect than the general population. The impact of being removed from your parents causes deep and lasting harm. That a doctor would threaten this action is appalling. If you question his medical care on other health issues, will he report you for that, too. As a parent, I wouldn't take that chance.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Get the fresh spring rolls. Or anything, really. They take care that you enjoy your meal.
Food: ExcellentDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Excellent gyros and cheese steak sandwiches. Haven't had the pizza. Good cocktails for very low prices. Go there a few times and the staff remembers you.
Food: ExcellentDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
I really like this particular DoubleTree. The staff busts butt to make your stay perfect. We stayed in a 2 room suite with microwave, fridge, and balcony and we had a blast. So happy Paganicon has them as their host hotel - I'm happy to go back every year.
Quality: Very GoodFacilities: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
11 reviews
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Amazing food! Haven't had a bad meal there. The staff is very welcoming and attentive without being annoying. Lunch is cheaper, but dinner still affordable for a family.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Solid diner fare, especially breakfast.
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
The biggest negative for La Belle Vie is portion size. I've been to similar restaurants around the country and I do understand that the portions are intentionally small so you can enjoy several courses. However, five courses and $80 per person later, your entire dinner group shouldn't leave the restaurant and go eat a second dinner somewhere else. For a 5 course dinner the portions are simple too small for that number of courses. So do the 8 course dinner (at a higher cost) or don't eat here. Or eat something before you go. Even if you are small female. That out of the way.... The food is amazing. There's no other way to say it. And no matter what your food allergy or preference, they will cheerfully and creatively accommodate you. I only rated the food as "good' due to portion size. Otherwise it would be excellent. The cocktails are some of the very best in the entire Midwest. Good balance of daring and tried and true. The service, likewise, is the best in the Midwest. I cannot find a single fault with it. You will feel special and pampered.
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Food: GoodDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago