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Capt. John Swallow
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Capt. John Swallow

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Trying to scrape a few more barnacles off the ship and be on our way.
Our 7th 'official' year o' volunteering, promoting & sharing in New Orleans and Louisiana. Our travels have taken us all o'er the state (in one form or another) and, like our ancestors before us, we mark the map with the amazing people & places we visit. There are obviously many places in New Orleans itself, but there are many more outside it's boundaries; from places like Cocodrie - where there is more water than land now - to hidden gems o' antiquity upriver past Donaldsonville!
(Ye can check the map here: http://j.mp/1r9zsaE)

Give us a hand if yer able...be a part o' the adventure.
NOLA Pyrate Week - Take what ye can, GIVE something back!
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Capt. John Swallow

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Elegant and excellent was that Pyrate's answer to the great Macedonian Alexander, who had taken him; the King asking him how he durst molest the seas so, he replied with a free spirit: "How darest thou molest the whole earth? But because I do it only with a little ship, I am called Brigand: thou doing it with a great navy art called Emperor."
(St. Augustine, City of God, Book IV)
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Ship's Stores
Partial list of stores loaded aboard an English privateer at the Irish provisioning port of Kinsale, in 1708

Four Barrells of Beefe
Four Hogsheads of Pork
Eighty two ferkins of Butter
Six hundred weight of Cheese
Eighteen Butts of Beere
Three Boxes of Soape
Fourteen Boxes of Candles
Twelve Barrells of Oatmeale
Three Hogsheads of Vinegar
Six Pieces of Canvas for Hammocks
Fourty Beds
Fourty Pillows
Fourty Rugs
Fifty Red Coats
One hundred and fifty Capps
Four Casks of Tallow
Six hors hydes
Three Sole Leather hydes
One earthen Oven
Twelve dozen Stockings
One hundred weight of Corke
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V. That Man that shall strike another whilst these Articles are in force, shall receive Moses’ Law (that is, 40 Stripes lacking one) on the bare Back.
VI. That Man that shall snap his Arms, or smoke Tobacco in the Hold, without a Cap to his Pipe, or carry a Candle lighted without a Lanthorn, shall suffer the same Punishment as in the former Article.

Yer looking for pipes with a covered bowl - still used today by sportsmen, sailors and many places in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In fact on ships they were written into "the code" or "articles" (as above - from Capt. John Philips of The Revenge)

Covering a pipe's bowl had the obvious benefit of keeping the burning embers from blowing out - a common problem especially if the contents were not properly tamped (compressed into the bowl before lighting with a small tool or a finger - helps burn longer too). It also kept the pipe burning longer as the wind would not increase the rate of burning. Covered pipes may have originated in the North Africa, Middle East and throughout Asia, so they would have come to sailors early on from the marketplaces near the coast - especially throughout the Mediterranean.
 
This site has an entire museum of pipe history and several example of bowl covers from the plain to the very elaborate. http://www.pijpenkabinet.nl also here http://www.kalyna.ca/pipes.htm
 
In the day (as today) pipes would have been hand carved of hardwoods, meerschaum (a mineral that floats in the Black Sea), bone, or formed of clay (though these were somewhat impractical at sea).
 
Lighting pipes would often be done with a "punk" lit on a candle (the same way ye'd light a cannon fuse). A punk was often a piece of tightly wound hempen cord dipped in tallow...a bit like a candle wick. The spark from a small bit of flint and iron could light a pipe, though more difficult. A small protected fire was often kept burning (on deck) for such things in a covered bowl (about the size of a half coconut).
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Of all the water on earth, only 3 percent is fresh water. Of all the fresh water on the planet, 69 percent is frozen in glaciers and the icecaps, 30 percent is underground, and less than 1 percent exists as rivers, lakes, and streams. Less than 1 percent of all water on our planet is usable to quench our growing population’s thirst for drinking water, irrigation, and industry. ~ Jean-Michel Cousteau
March 18, 2015. Indispensable, yet often undervalued – water is the source of all life on our planet. Each year, the United Nations (UN) celebrates International World Water Day on March 22nd, focusing global attention to the importance of freshwater and advocating for sustainable management of ...
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We still need to collect a few doubloons to help us on our journey. Hundreds o' folks connect with us on 'social media'; if each could spare at least $10-$20, we'd have the ship patched in no time! It all goes to several good causes in the end...
Most o' ye are aware o' NOLA Pyrate Week - and whiile it's always "fun up to yer Buccaneers", it's a lot o' work...which we do for a few reasons.1. We love it and love the people, places & communities it helps promote/support. 2. It's a great way to engage folks into giving back - and learning a few things at the same time (history & culture). 3. It's a huge "mental health" (health in general) respite. We have volunteered and helped encourage don...
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Pyrates doing good? Aye! 200 years ago the Laffite brothers & their crew helped save the US...we're just asking for a little help to get us on our way.

This year NOLA Pyrate Week has plans to volunteer & help Villalobos Rescue Center, Education Day in Jean Lafitte, Pyrate Day in Houma (families) - working with Keep Terrebonne Beautiful, Street Survivors RC, United Houma Nation...and o' course sharing the history & culture o' Louisiana!
#Pyrates   #culture   #history #education #NOLA #HamOnt  
AVAST! It's been a bloody awful year and the ship is aground. We come afore ye, hats in hand, to ask yer assistance. A helping hand to patch the ship and move foreward - help us, so that we may continue to help others.
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Have him in circles
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Capt. John Swallow

➭ Past: Ain't Dere No More/History  - 
 
Another (silent) look at New Orleans, 1923 -footage produced by Ford Motor Co. (#100 in the series "Ford Educational Library - Cities Of America")
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It's interesting to see what has/hasn't changed...nice to see so much preserved!
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Some fine accoutrements...
Your one stop shop for Hand Forged Throwing Tomahawks and Boarding Axes, Pirate Swords, Knives and daggers made for use and battle ready
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Thank ye to the folks who've helped (ye know who ye are) - yer good mates. Thank ye to those who responded at all - we understand.
It's interesting who responds to these calls - always most surprising and uplifting. A bit like how we feel when folks thank us for helping out where we do. From a lovely elderly Woman who spent 3 days trapped in her attic with her disabled Nephew (who is twice her size and she had to pull him up there) during the flooding in the 9th Ward, whose house we helped fix...to folks in Bayou Lafourche thanking us for taking the "110 degrees in the shade, dodging traffic" position in the Bayou Cleanup. It means something...and that's what counts.
AVAST! It's been a bloody awful year and the ship is aground. We come afore ye, hats in hand, to ask yer assistance. A helping hand to patch the ship and move foreward - help us, so that we may continue to help others.
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+Capt. John Swallow I clicked on the doubloon and got the paypal NOLA page. Correct?
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A grand gift and a fitting tribute...from Ireland to the Choctaw Nation.
As reported by Ireland Calling, city officials in Cork, Ireland were looking for a unique way to mark the Choctaw Nation’s generosity and kindness during a dark period of Ireland’s history: The Great Irish Famine. Approximately one million people died of disease and starvation, and another million were forced to leave Ireland in order to ...
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Capt. John Swallow

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Ye could help Pyrates do good & support real #nola communities & causes http://j.mp/18dpYIB
Or invest in the ridiculous http://j.mp/1GeZH7T <-really? "Single use Monocles"?!? This is why we can't have nice things...
AVAST! It's been a bloody awful year and the ship is aground. We come afore ye, hats in hand, to ask yer assistance. A helping hand to patch the ship and move foreward - help us, so that we may continue to help others.
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Have him in circles
669 people
danuta Chojecka's profile photo
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Pyrate, Photographer, Historical Fictioneer
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Pyrate, Photographer, Historical Fictioneer...(that's CAPT. John Swallow)
Introduction
Buccaneer...Pyrate Of The New World...a founder of the Pyrates Union...a founder of NOLA Pyrate Week...

Take what ye can, GIVE something back!™
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Capt. John Swallow's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Still one o' the best Po'Boys in New Orleans! Classic sandwich, dressed or not, fresh bread & ingredients, prepared as fast as humanly possible given the usual lineup...the staff are a jolly crew and do a fine job. Great food, casual atmosphere, free parking...classic NOLA. Pyrate Approved™
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Mizener's is a great place to spend the day - nice folks, lots o' variety and many hidden treasures! There is food & drink on site, lot's o land to wander around (or picnic outside) and many buildings filled with treasure - everything from antiques to tools & sports gear! A "Family Adventure" on a Sunday! Wave to Danya (the Owner) on the way in and tell her the Pyrates sent ye!
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
8 reviews
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