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Spray Foam Insulation Helps Pest and Sound Proofing
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Your walls may not be as tough as you think. Alone they aren’t enough to keep you insulated from the weather, sound, and pests. A barrier between walls is necessary to keep heat and sound in the house, and cold, dampness and pests out. Most homes are already fitted with some sort of insulation, but not all of them are created equal.
Many homes, especially older ones, are outfitted with fiberglass insulation. Fiberglass is made of lightweight, wiry pink fibers that are compressed together into sheets. Although inexpensive and to a small degree effective at climate control, fiberglass offers minimal protection and saves little energy.
It also can be harmful to your health. Touching fiberglass can make the skin itchy and sore, while inhaling one of the sharp fibers can cause serious health issues. They can become caught in the throat, creating scars that can potentially cause further problems.
To create the strongest barriers between your walls and the outside world, consider the benefits of spray foam insulation as an alternative to traditional fiberglass. Spray foam is liquid polyurethane which solidifies into a spongy material once it hits the wall.
Since it is applied in liquid form, it is able to penetrate the entire surface being treated, filling in the tiniest of cracks. The fewer gaps there are between the insulation and the walls, the stronger the protection against outside elements.
The thick barrier created by spray foam makes it nearly impossible for small pests and insects to burrow into your home. Whereas fiberglass is easily chewed, torn, or simply displaced over time, spray foam insulation sticks permanently to the area.
Its uneven texture and strength make it a formidable obstacle for any pest that would dare attempt to break through it. Water and mold will also be discouraged from seeping in and causing damage. Spray foam is a safe alternative to other materials with benefits that include mold prevention.
Spray foam insulation can also be used to better soundproof the walls. The thick surface dampens loud noise. It also can be sprayed in a variety of places, including ceilings and floors. No more will you have to suffer loud noise from your basement or teen’s bedroom.
In addition to pest control and soundproofing, it is a green material. It saves far more energy than fiberglass, keeping more heat in during cool months and more hot air out during summers.
It is also created using renewable and recyclable resources, which helps to contribute back to the economy as well as the environment. And while initially it may seem expensive, spray foam insulation will increase the value of your home and save you plenty on electric bills, saving you more money in the long run. Your home is your fortress, so if you want to protect it, you have to start with the foundation first. Investing in spray foam insulation will make your house less vulnerable to the elements (as well as your noisy neighbors). And you won’t have to worry about potential health risks. Contact an insulation specialist to find out more.

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How To Build Jon Risch's DIY Acoustic Panels
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Jon Risch’s DIY acoustic panels have changed my system more than any other tweak and component upgrade. After placing the panels at my listening room’s early and diffraction reflection points (two behind the speakers and four on the sidewalls (the two panels closest to me actually sit in easy chairs because I can’t move the chairs out of the way)) I heard these improvements. Since that initial listening session I’ve had mixed results from CDs played in my Pioneer DV-47ai and Taddeo Digital Antidote II: certain frequencies and instruments are too laid back. I’ll remove the Taddeo and see if I get the same great performance as from my Airtunes playing MAX ripped Apple Lossless tracks.
Read on for my tips and tricks to build these panels yourself and save up to 90% over commercial acoustic panels.
Materials needed for 6 17×48 inch acoustic panels:
* Home Store: 24 feet R-25 Insulation (15 in. wide and 8 in. thick)
* Home Store: 16 4 foot long 1×4 Std boards
* Home Store: #8 2 in. Screws (I bought the self-drilling kind so I only had to drill countersunk pilot holes in the long boards of the frame, the shorter boards to the screws without any splits)
* Home Store: 9/16 Staples (you need the long staples to get through the many layers of fabric and batting)
* Fabric Store: 10 yards 4 oz. 100% Polyester Batting
* Fabric Store: 10 yards Burlap (let your spouse help pick the color, then she can’t complain later)
Tools needed:
* Power Drill/Driver
* Corner Vise (spend at least $8, the $3 one broke as soon as it touched wood, which cost me another trip to the home store)
* Staple Gun (you will be stapling like a madman on this project so be sure and get a nice staple gun, I killed my Black and Decker Powershot half way through the project and had to buy a new one that still had jamming problems, so don’t use a Powershot, get a nice Arrow gun)
* Miter Hand Saw
Construction
Wood Frames
* Match 4 ft. studs for length into 6 pairs
* Take 4 worst studs and cut down to 12x 15 in. lengths with hand miter saw (or table saw), make 90 degree cuts
* Take a small scrap of 1×4 and mark depth at either end of 4 ft struts
* Drill 2 counter sunk pilot holes at each end in the middle of the marked off area on the long boards
* Using a 90 degree corner vice, butt up a short and long post. Drill screws through the pilot holes into the short board. Repeat for the other long and short pair. You now have two “L” shapes.
* Attach the two “L”‘s just like in the previous step to form a rectangle 17 in. x 48 in. x 4 in. depth.
Attach Insulation to Frames
* With all the frames finished set up two saw horses (or storage boxes like I improvised) in an area where you can easily cut and clean up fiberglass (like your garage)
* Measure the inside length of your first frame, it should be about 46 in depending on the accuracy of your long 48 inch 1×4’s.
* Put on your fiberglass insulation protective gear (my get up includes a respirator, suede gloves and Tyvek coveralls (sweaty))
* Partially unroll your insulation on a cutting surface (like the concrete garage floor) and measure a length of 46 in. (or whatever the previous inside length of the frame was)
* Lay the frame across the saw horses with the horses about a quarter length in from each end
* With the kraft face side up, press the insulation into the frame. Staple the paper strips to the frame, securing the insulation.
* Set first frame aside and repeat for the rest.
Wrap frame in Polyester Batting
* Roll out your polyester batting on the same cutting surface as the insulation (you should have this all cleaned up now)
* Measure the length and add it to depth of either end of the frame including the insulation thickness. I decided to cut the lengths of my batting at 60 in. lengths (frame = 48 in. length + 2 x 6 in. depth) and keep the width to 48 in.
* Set the frame on the saw horses facing up (the kraft side of the insulation on the opposite side)
* Lay the polyester batting on top of the frame. Get the length as even as you can while positioning the batting along the width so the side closest to you hangs down about an inch below the frame, the opposite side should be hanging down by 24 in.
* Tuck the the short side batting between the bottom of the frame and the saw horses and flip the frame toward you so the 24 inch side falls across the kraft side of the frame.
* Staple along back frame
* Cut away excess batting and staple ends after folding like wrapping paper
* Make sure no insulation is exposed, the batting should completely encase the front, back, sides, top and bottom of entire framed fiberglass panel.
Wrap Frames in Burlap
* Wrapping the frames in burlap is just like the polyester batting with some tricks
* Cut the burlap to 60 in. lengths (another how to suggests starting a cut in the burlap and then pulling a loose string from the cut to create a straight line to cut along. This didn’t work for me, pulling the string would bunch up the fabric and then snap, at best I would get a straight line across half the cut)
* Lay the fabric over the panel unevenly and flip, wrapping the fabric around the back as described above with the polyester batting
* Pulling the burlap snug staple the long sides to the back of the wood frame
* Fold and staple the burlap to the bottom end of the frame like you’re wrapping a present
* Take off saw horses and give open top end a tug to pull front of fabric tight until wrinkles disappear. Cut away excess fabric and staple.
* Finish with fabric border to cover up staples
Place Frames at Early Reflection Points in your Listening Room
* While sitting in your sweet spot have a friend move a small mirror along your front and side walls. Have your friend mark the points along the walls that you can see the speaker drivers for the side walls and the inside corners of the loudspeakers on the front wall (or if you’re like me and couldn’t bring yourself to ask your eight month pregnant wife to slowly walk around with a mirror and tape you can use a CAD application or this formula and verify the calculated locations with a mirror taped to the wall in the approximate place)
* Place the panels at the mirror points (I’m just leaning mine against the wall at an angle so they don’t fall over, I’m not attaching the panels because I need to move them out of the room when not in use), bass absorption is improved by placing the panels at least four inches out from the wall
* Listen and enjoy!

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Home Insulation: Your Money-Saving Investigation
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Everyone can agree that energy costs are rising currently and will continue to rise in the future. That’s exactly why home insulation is one of the most important and wisest investments a homeowner can make. From the attic to the basement, there are many insulation options and choices that can make a great “degree” of variance.
Comparing Common Attic Insulation Types
Since heat rises, it’s important to know what’s going on in your attic. There are several different types of attic insulation, the most common of which are batt and loose-fill insulation. Let’s take a look at the different types of insulation and where they can be applied in each area of your home:
Loose-fill insulation is designed out of materials such as cellulose, fiberglass, rock wool and slack wool and is generally a more economical approach. This type of insulation also provides great protection from outdoor elements, as well as being the ideal choice for tough-to-reach areas.
Batt insulation is a more traditional approach that involves precut walls or blankets of fiberglass insulation. Fiberglass is a lightweight, inexpensive material that is available in your local box store and is very simple to install. Bear in mind that compressing this type of material inhibits its effectiveness. Cutting holes into the material to allow for wiring and pipes will also reduce its insular capability. Whichever choice you choose to install is completely up to you — and depends on your particular needs and wants.
Advantages Of Basement Insulation
Next we can move on down to the basement, and discover how home insulation can help you save significant amounts of money — especially in colder climates.
Not only does basement insulation help with your energy bills, it also transforms a previously cold and uncomfortable space into a warmer, usable area. This alone is a worthwhile investment for many people.
The two main types of basement insulation consist of either wall insulation or ceiling insulation. A myriad of options are available as far as the materials are concerned, and can range from classic roll insulation to panels and spray foam. Talk with your local contractor to determine which option would be best for your basement.
Take a bit of time to do some research and determine whether this a job that you can perform yourself or if it is better left to the professionals.
Optimizing Your Homes’ Energy Efficiency Through Insulation
As you have probably determined by now, home insulation is a very important part of your homes health and will ultimately save you money in the long run. As energy costs continue to rise, home insulation is something to consider and will ultimately contribute to a warm and happy home.

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Tips for an Eco-Friendly Summer
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Summer can be a particularly challenging time for people who want to lead a green lifestyle. Longer, hotter days mean more hours indoors, which inevitably leads to higher energy consumption. With summer quickly approaching, it’s important to prepare your household for peak temperatures, ensuring you use energy as efficiently as possible. Here are a few tips that will help reduce your energy consumption even in the heat.
Tactics You Can Use Year Round

Plugged-in electronics constantly pull electricity, so get in the habit of unplugging electronic devices when you aren’t using them. The biggest offenders include flatscreen TVs, cable boxes and DVRs. A power-strip is an easy way to quickly turn off and on your entertainment system or any number of electronics at once.
Completely turn off your computer, rather than simply letting it hibernate.
Use a solar mobile phone charger.
Turn off the lights whenever you leave a room and consider installing dimmer switches in the future.
Use fluorescent light bulbs whenever possible.
Only heat or cool the areas of the house you are actually using. Close doors and shut vents in spaces like unused guest rooms.

Household Chores

Water lawns and gardens early in the morning – 4am or earlier – allowing water to fully soak in before the afternoon heat. Every 7 to 10 days, add one-to-three parts microbial inoculant to your lawn water mix. A microbial innoculant will help ensure a healthy micro-environment, improving soil structure, drainage and water retention (increased drought tolerance).
Install low flow show heads in your shower and opt for short showers rather than baths.
Wash clothes on the cold setting whenever possible and hang towels out to air dry.

Control Your Indoor Environment

Install darkening curtains or window treatments in rooms with significant sun exposure during peak summer hours. The room will remain cooler, requiring far less air-conditioning.
Rather than simply closing blinds or shutters, angle them to directly reflect the sun.
Attics are one of the easiest and least expensive parts of the house to insulate. The good news is, attic insulation can shave between 20 and 25% off your electricity bill, paying for the upgrade in just a matter of months.
Seal cool air in and keep hot air out by closing gaps around doors and windows. Easy remedies include caulk around windows and weather stripping on doors.
Air sealing with spray foam insulation will tighten up the house as well. Simply pull back insulation and spray cracks in joints and around joists. Then place the insulation back. Be sure not to crush the insulation if it is fiberglass. If you have blown cellulose insulation, there is no need to air seal.
Check your insulation to see if there are lots of gaps or if it has settled a lot. Fiberglass insulation looses its insulating value as it compacts. Cellulose insulation value increases as it settles. If there are lots of gaps in the fiberglass insulation or it has settled to only a few inches, it may be a good idea to install cellulose insulation to increases.
Make sure there is a cover over your attic entry way that fits properly. These look like big styrofoam coolers and fit over pull-down stairs. If you have a door entryway, there are insulation boards that can be fitted in the doorway to block hot or cold air.
Insulate pipes with pipe insulation that are either in the attic or underneath the house if you have a crawl space or basement. This can be done easily by yourself.
In the transition months, when temperatures aren’t unbearable, opt to use fans rather than a/c whenever possible.
Check the filters on your a/c unit and replace them when necessary. Have a pro look at you’re a/c system every year to ensure Freon levels are sufficient. When filters are clogged or Freon is low, the system has work harder, for longer in order to produce the same cooling affect.


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How to Assess Different Types of Insulation
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Insulation is a major issue for any type of construction, whether it’s a residential or commercial building. Basically, insulation is a building material designed to reduce heat loss through the exterior walls of the building. Since the 1930’s, fiberglass has been widely used all across the world, and it is still the most common insulation type in the United States. Fiberglass insulation is made from woven blankets or fine glass fibers, creating affordable and easy to install insulation solutions. However, compared to other modern types of insulation, their effectiveness is rather poor.
Nowadays, there are numerous other types of insulation, available to meet every budget or need. Now you can choose from a wider variety, with various insulation products made from different types of foam, cellulose or cotton. Foam sheets, for instance, either made from polyurethane or polystyrene, provide far higher R-values than fiberglass insulation. However, with a price to match.
An intermediate solution so to say, between fiberglass and foam regarding price ranges, is cellulose. Cellulose insulation prices are a bit higher than those for fiberglass, but then again, the insulation level is also higher. It is made from shredded wood or newspaper. With special equipment, cellulose insulation is blown into attics or ceiling spaces to reduce heat loss.
The best way to compare different types of insulation is to check the R-value of each material. The R-value refers to the ability of a material to block heat transfer, measuring its effectiveness. Based on these measurements, higher R-rates are assigned to materials that provide more effective insulation. According to the United Stated Department of Energy, fiberglass, the R-values for fiberglass or cotton blankets insulation range from 2-3 per inch, while the R-values for foam insulators may go as high as 8 per inch. Cellulose has R-rates between 3.4 and 3.8 per inch.
There are several factors to be considered when choosing the type of insulation. Of course, price is always an issue, but any investment will have effects in the long run. Consider the price of materials and installation, but take into account the future energy bills. An effective insulation will result in lower utility bills, without sacrificing the comfort level. And if energy use is reduced, it not only helps your budget, but it also helps the environment.
The climate should also play a very important part in your decision, because it will directly affect the effectiveness of a certain type of insulation. Consider the average temperatures to determine the required level of insulation. Different types of insulation are suitable for different applications, so ponder your options carefully in order to choose the most appropriate type.

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Disadvantages Of Using Fibreglass Insulation In A Cellar
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Why do people use fibreglass?
Fibreglass insulation is extremely popular with the DIY market for several reasons. Firstly, it’s readily available at all large home improvement stores; secondly, it’s cheap; and thirdly, it’s a lightweight material that’s easy to work with and simple to remove and replace. Your basement or cellar is very different than any other room in your home. So whilst fibreglass insulation is a great choice for insulating your roof, it’s not such a smart option for basements and cellars. Here’s why:
Disadvantages of Fibreglass
1. Ruined by water and moisture
Much like a sponge, fibreglass absorbs water and humidity. As a result, it can become saturated with moisture via basement flooding, water leaking through walls, or simply from the high humidity levels that occur in this below-grade space.
2. Sagging and falling down
Wet fibreglass loses nearly all of its insulating value. Adding moisture to fibreglass transforms a light, fluffy material into a heavy material that sags, compresses and often falls out of place. Fibreglass batt insulation installed between ceiling joists in a cellar or basement often ends up on the floor if it gets wet.
3. Supports mould growth
It’s not rocket science to figure out that before too long, wet fibreglass is going to encourage mould and mildew growth, which is very bad news for your health. Mold growth that originates in fibreglass insulation can eventually lead to wood rot in nearby structural lumber, which can threaten the building’s structural integrity.
4. Air circulation
Fibreglass insulation can’t stop air circulation. So the insulation does nothing to stop air leaks that occur around cellar windows and around the perimeter of the cellar or basement. Fibreglass insulation does nothing to stop cold, damp air from leaking into the basement and up into the living space above.
5. Compression and settling
Over time, fibreglass insulation can settle and/or compress. This significantly reduces its insulating effectiveness (referred to as ‘R-value,’ for Resistance to heat transfer). In older fibreglass insulation, the R-value will drop as the insulation settles or compacts. Whether installed in wood-framed walls or between joists, fibreglass batts compress easily and are prone to falling out of place. This not only creates a mess; it also renders the insulation all but useless.
6. Loose fibres
Be warned: fibres can loosen and float around, making them really uncomfortable to work with. If you do attempt to work with fibreglass, always wear long sleeves, eye protection, and a hat and gloves to keep the fibres off your skin and nowhere near your lungs.
7. Excellent pest habitat.
Mice, rodents and insects find fibreglass insulation to provide an excellent habitat. Mice find the material’s light, fluffy texture to be ideal for nests. Anyone who has removed old fibreglass insulation from a basement, crawl space or cellar will be able to confirm how much rodents like this material.
8. Environmental impact
Although fibreglass insulation saves energy post-installation, the manufacturing process isn’t terribly green. It takes around three times as much energy to produce fibreglass as it takes to manufacture cellulose insulation.

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Spray Foam Vs Fiberglass: Two Insulation's Duke It Out for Champ Status
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In this corner, weighing in at ½ lb. to 4 lbs. per cubic foot, new kid on the block and up-and-comer — spray polyurethane foam insulation. And in this corner, king of the insulations and industry standard for decades — fiberglass. In the battle to determine which building insulation is the better value for money, which one wins? The answer may surprise you.
Many people wonder how spray foam and fiberglass compare. Usually, what they really want to know is how much more expensive spray foam is. Phrased another way, which building insulation is the better value for money? The answer is always the same: spray foam and fiberglass can’t be compared, price-wise or in any other way. That’s because these two insulations are completely different products that work on different principles.
Let’s take a deeper look…
ROUND ONE: Fiberglass as Insulator
Fiberglass insulation has been the industry standard insulation for decades because it’s usually easy to install, quick to put in place, and relatively inexpensive. Sure, it’s a decent insulator, doesn’t significantly add to building costs, and can be retrofitted easily and inexpensively for existing buildings. But while fiberglass has been the big man on campus for a long time, it doesn’t solve all of a building’s energy problems. That’s where spray polyurethane foam comes in. More on that in a minute, but first let’s touch on which is perhaps the number one problem plaguing most buildings today: air leakage.
Eliminating air flow is critical to a building’s overall energy efficiency and creating a high-quality building envelope. But because traditional forms of insulation, including fiberglass, are not air barriers, wherever these types of insulations are installed, approximately 40-50% of an energy bill is related to air leakage. That’s a lot of money and energy being wasted.
Fiberglass, in other words, is an insulator only. It does little, if anything, to combat air leakage.
ROUND TWO: Spray Foam as Insulator and Air Barrier
Air leakage may not sound like a big deal at first. What’s the harm in having a few cracks here or there, right? That might not sound like a catastrophe, but consider that the average building has more gaps and crevices than you might think: windows and doors are biggies, as are floors, walls and ceilings, but don’t forget about recessed lights, plumbing penetrations, fireplace flues, electrical outlets, vents and fans, attic hatches, wall air conditioners, mail slots…the list could go on and on. Adding all those areas up amounts to approximately 60% of the air in a building being lost through a leaky building envelope.
Spray polyurethane foam to the rescue. Spray foam is two products in one. Because it’s spray applied, it fills every nook and cranny and hole and crack and crevice, thus eliminating air leakage. Partner this with a high R value, and you’ve got yourself a product that solves two major problems that exist in buildings today: insufficient insulation and air leakage.
Spray foam, in other words, is an insulator and air barrier. Now compare this to fiberglass that only insulates. Foam offers something that fiberglass can’t, an extra benefit that comes standard, like power windows in a car. Fiberglass will never be an effective air barrier, whereas foam by its very nature is an air barrier. Now do you see how these types of insulations can’t be compared?
ROUND THREE: The Price Comparison
So when faced with the inevitable question, “Is spray foam more expensive than fiberglass?” we always say, “Well, yes, of course.” That’s because foam offers additional benefits that fiberglass can’t. Wouldn’t you expect to pay more for a product that offers more benefits? It’s like asking if a car with power windows is more expensive than a car with manual crank windows. Unless the car with manual windows has other amenities not available in the car with power windows, the power window car will be more expensive.
So how much more expensive is spray foam over fiberglass? Usually about twice as much. That’s a hard pill to swallow for a lot of people on a tight budget, or otherwise fearful of outlaying twice as much money upfront for a product they’ll probably never see. But it’s important to keep this in mind: spray foam is a permanent once-and-done insulation, so while you’re paying more upfront for it, it’ll last the lifetime of your building and will never need to be updated. Plus, the money you pay upfront will come back to you over time in the form of a less expensive utility bill every month. Remember that spray foam is an air barrier, so the 40-50% of your utility bill associated with air leakage will be eliminated. That’s a huge bonus compared to traditional fiberglass insulation.
So in the battle of spray foam vs. fiberglass, fiberglass still has a place in the market for its inexpensive ability to insulate quickly (yet not permanently). But if you’re looking for a product that offers more, in the form of air leakage protection and increased savings on utility bills, spray foam is the champ.

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Dealing With Fiberglass Insulation in Air Duct Cleaning
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Many commercial air duct cleaning contractors encounter fiberglass insulation in the air handlers, plenums and ductwork of the HVAC systems they are cleaning. Engineers originally designed in fiberglass insulation in HVAC systems for acoustical reasons (help control sound) or for thermal reason (to help prevent temperature loss). Dealing with fiberglass insulation can be a real challenge. It can be damaged or degraded by:
• Air erosion from the fan in the air handler
• Smoke contamination from a fire
• Mold or microbial contamination cause by the combination of excessive moisture and a microbial food source (dirt).
What do you do? What are your options? In all cases, the first thing you must do is to inspect the fiberglass to determine the condition it’s in. Can it stand up to the rigors of cleaning or does it fall apart when you touch it? Is it wet?
In air handles and large plenums/ductwork that you can crawl, you have the following options to consider:
• If the fiberglass insulation is in good shape and can stand up to the rigor of cleaning you can clean the insulation or clean and coat the insulation.
• If the fiberglass insulation is not in good shape and cannot stand up to the rigor of cleaning you can remove the insulation or remove and coat the sheet metal or remove and replace with new insulation or remove and replace with new coated material or remove and replace with close cell material.
• If the insulation is wet you can remove the insulation or remove and coat the sheet metal or remove and replace with new insulation or remove and replace with new coated insulation or remove and replace with close cell material.
In ductwork that is too small to crawl you have the following options to consider:
• If the insulation is in good shape and can stand up to the rigor of cleaning you can clean the insulation or clean and coat the insulation.
• If the insulation is not in good shape and cannot stand up to the rigor of cleaning you can remove the ductwork and replace with new ductwork (with insulation on the outside).
• If the insulation is wet you can remove the ductwork and replace with new ductwork (with insulation on the outside).
Normal cleaning methods include contact vacuuming or cleaning with a powered brushing system/robotic system with a nylon brush and then air washing. This removes the dirt/contamination from the surface of the insulation but does not remove the dirt/contaminating from the interior of the fiberglass insulation. To keep this dirt/contamination in the interior of the fiberglass insulation from becoming a future problem you can coat the mechanical insulation. The benefits of coating include:
• Locking down any remaining loose fiberglass fibers after cleaning.
• Locking in the dirt/microbial spores/smoke contaminates inside the interior of the fiberglass so we can’t smell the smoke particulate and the microbial spores can’t combine with moisture and grow.
• Providing a more durable air steam surface that is more resistant to air erosion and moisture and is easier to clean in the future.
• A way to extend the life of the HVAC system for the building owner at a lower cost than replacing ductwork, air handlers and other system components.
Another option to cleaning and coating is to replace the damaged/degraded mechanical insulation with closed cell insulation. You remove the existing insulation; measure and cut the appropriate size close cell material; then glue and rivet the close cell insulation in place; seal all exposed edges and butt joints. The benefits of relining with closed cell include:
• You have eliminated the damaged fiberglass insulation altogether.
• Providing a more durable air steam surface that is more resistant to air erosion and moisture and is easier to clean in the future.
• A way to extend the life of the HVAC system for the building owner at a lower cost than replacing ductwork, air handlers and other system components.

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Installation of Polystyrene Insulation on Fiberglass
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Insulating a home can be performed by setting up a blend of fiberglass and the polystyrene foam insulation. Generally the fiberglass filling is utilized in between the hoops of the walls that are outside the home and is set up from indoors. On the other hand the polystyrene foam insulation is generally set up and fixed to the externals side of a home. The polystyrene insulation and the fiberglass insulation combine in a form where the polystyrene filling is set up on the fiberglass one. Given below I have provided the process by which these two kinds of insulation can be combined.
Utilize a measuring strip in order to determine the proportions of the place that requires to be covered with polystyrene foam insulation. Determine the altitude from the peak to the base and then measure the breadth from sides. Buy the panels of polystyrene insulation from any house development store. Utilize the calculations that have already been taken of the entire place in order to decide the number of panels you must buy.
First of all set up lone panels as they will not require to be slashed for fitting. Now set a panel straightly on the fiberglass filling and then fix it to the side. Utilize a mallet and fixers to secure the panel of the filling to the hoops in the side. Afterwards determine the dimensions of places that will require a particular range of filling cut. Always remember to create a mark on the panel of insulation with a pen or marker at the place from where you are going to cut it. Finally take the help of a sharp blade or saw in order to slash the panel of the filling to accurate dimension and afterwards fix it on the fiberglass filling on the wall.

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Why Is Pipe Insulation Important?
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Good insulation keeps heat in and out in certain conditions to maintain an ideal temperature. In homes and buildings where pipes serve as passage way for hot or cold water, insulation is a must. Insulating pipes is done for three main reasons:



Preventing water in pipes from freezing

During winter, the weather will freeze the water in pipes outside a house or building. This can cause the pipes to clog up, leading to bursting pipes. Pipe insulation will ensure that water will run lukewarm or hot depending on the setting that you choose. It will also save you from the additional repair and replacement costs of pipes.



Preventing heat transfer or heat loss

If your home or office building has centralized heating, pipe insulation prevents the heat loss that can lead to higher electric bills and more CO2 emissions. Your central heating system will exert less effort in order to maintain an ideal water temperature in the pipes.



Safety measures

Heated pipes have high temperatures. That is why they should be lined with an insulative material not just on the interior but also on the exterior. Pipe insulation prevents accidental scalding.
Types of Insulation
For thermal insulation, pipes are often insulated using fiberglass and foam lining. The heat resistance depends on the thickness of the fiberglass and foam used. The types of foam typically used are made from rigid phenolic, polyisocyarunate, polyethylene and polyurethane. These substances, together with fiberglass, do not emit or leak toxic by-products when they come in contact with high heat or fire.
Installation and Maintenance
Insulating your pipes should not be a DIY project. Insulation materials are often standardized to ensure safety. Moreover, there are different factors such as surface area, thermal conductivity and density to consider when browsing for insulative materials. If your pipes at home are not yet insulated and you live in a region with a cold climate, you should hire a professional to perform the insulation. This could be a plumber or a heating engineer. The cost of their services, the materials used, installation and repairs (if any) would vary depending on the amount and location of the pipes. There are insulation companies that offer free quotation online or by phone.
Pipe insulation naturally wears off over the years. Before winter comes, it is important to have your pipes checked to see if anything needs to be fixed. This could be a leaky pipe, substance (mineral, grease, etc) buildup, or a worn-out insulation.

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