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Exploring the frontiers of knowledge
Exploring the frontiers of knowledge

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With the New Year, everyone is making new resolutions. Ours is to make sure we give everyone the best content in the best places. Over 2016, the number of followers and the level of engagement on CERN’s Google+ page has declined. In 2017, we will no longer post on Google+ and will focus on our other social media channels. You can continue the adventures with us by following:

twitter.com/cern/
instagram.com/cern
youtube.com/cerntv
facebook.com/cern
linkedin.com/company/cern

You can also continue on Google+ by following +ATLAS Experiment and +CMS Experiment.

It’s been a pleasure to share our love of physics with you. Thank you very much!

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The past year has seen an avalanche of record-breaking results, exciting developments and new experiments at CERN.

In this short video, CERN looks back on the highlights and headlines that have made 2016.

You can read more about individual news items on our Updates page: http://home.cern/about/updates

Produced by: CERN Video Productions
Editor: Noemi Caraban


Copyright © 2016 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/

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With the last part of our #InPractice series, find out why the future for experimental physics is most definitively bright.

http://cern.ch/go/G1inpractice4

Image credit Sophia Bennett/CERN © CERN – for terms of use see: http://cern.ch/copyright
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The BASE (Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment) antiprotons celebrate their first birthday!

Read more: http://cern.ch/go/v6TJ

Image credit Image: Stefan Sellner/CERN © CERN - for terms of use see: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/
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In a paper published today in Nature, the ALPHA collaboration reports the 1st ever measurement on the light spectrum of an antimatter atom. This achievement features technological developments that open up a completely new era in high-precision antimatter research.

Read more: http://cern.ch/go/AlphaG

Producer: CERN Video Productions
Director: Jacques-Hervé Fichet / Paola Catapano

Copyright © 2016 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/

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Did you guess it?

This photo shows part of the neutron time-of-flight facility, n_TOF. It has been in operation at CERN since 2001 and studies neutron–nucleus interactions.

The name n_TOF comes from the fact that neutron kinetic energy is determined by time-of-flight. To produce neutrons, a pulsed beam of protons from the Proton Synchrotron (PS) is directed at a lead target.

Data produced by n_TOF are used in astrophysics to study stellar evolution and supernovae. Intense neutron beams are also important in hadrontherapy (the treatment of tumors with beams of hadrons) and studies of how to incinerate waste.

Learn more about n_TOF: http://cern.ch/go/Rd8p

Congratulations to +Bob Looter, the first to get the answer to Friday’s post.

Image © CERN – for terms of use see: http://cern.ch/copyright
Guess what it is?

Image © CERN – For terms of use see http://cern.ch/copyright

(Answer will be posted on Monday.)
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Yesterday, the Sun aligned with the centre of our galaxy allowing the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) to search for any exotic particles it might emit.

Find out more: http://cern.ch/go/9wgT

Producer: CERN Video Productions / Madalin-Mihai Rosu
Director: Madalin-Mihai Rosu

Copyright © 2016 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/
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Slovenia will enter the Associate Member State family of CERN.

Read more: http://cern.ch/go/r8Dm

Image credit Sophia Bennett/CERN © CERN – for terms of use see: http://cern.ch/copyright
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Guess what it is?

Image © CERN – For terms of use see http://cern.ch/copyright

(Answer will be posted on Monday.)
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1970: ISR main control room

#ThrowbackThursday #TBT

This photo shows the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) main control room on the night of 20 October 1970 when a beam of protons was first successfully injected into Ring I. Later, on 27 January 1971, two beams of protons collided in the ISR for the first time.

The ISR was the world’s first hadron collider and performed the first-ever proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions.

Read more about the ISR: http://cern.ch/go/NP6h?utm_campaign=engagor&utm_content=engagor_MzgxMzUzMA%3D%3D&utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus

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