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Public health partners can work together to ensure every newborn baby is screened. If you missed our recent CDC Public Health Grand Rounds session on newborn screening, watch the video and earn free continuing education. http://bit.ly/2dbjajx
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Teachers: Looking for a fun way to teach science? Help your students learn how to be Disease Detectives and download CDC’s Solve the Outbreak app to teach your students about epi curves, attack rates, and epidemiology. GooglePlay: http://bit.ly/1YDwKfN iTunes: http://bit.ly/Y7pFEn
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Teachers: Are you looking for a fun, educational game to teach students about health and science? Check out CDC’s new Health IQ App for your students. Available in GooglePlay http://bit.ly/1FrAifv and iTunes http://apple.co/1V8easC.
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Traditional bloodspot screening and point-of-care screening tests share the goal of making sure that newborns are tested for certain potentially life-threatening conditions. However, there are still many challenges in standardizing and reporting test results. Watch the next CDC Public Health Grand Rounds webcast on Tuesday, September 20, at 1:00 pm ET http://1.usa.gov/1rzB4JL
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Newborn screening began in the United States in the 1960s to test for medical conditions that may not be apparent just by looking at a baby. Finding these conditions soon after birth can help prevent certain serious problems, such as brain damage, organ damage, and even death. The traditional method of newborn screening is bloodspot testing, wherein blood is sent to a lab to be screened for a number of conditions. There is also a newer paradigm of point-of-care newborn screening to test for hearing loss and critical congenital heart defects, conditions that are not identifiable through blood tests.

Both traditional bloodspot screening and the newer point-of-care screening tests share the goals of making sure that newborns are tested for certain potentially life-threatening conditions, and ensuring that providers follow up based on test results. The newer tests, however, do pose some unique challenges for public health. Because these tests take place in the health care setting rather than in a lab, it is difficult to standardize both the implementation of the tests and reporting of the test results. Newborn screening is also mandated by each individual state, so tests required in some states may not be in others.

In this session of Public Health Grand Rounds, you will hear how some states have implemented point-of-care newborn screening and what challenges they have faced in standardizing these tests and tracking test results. Speakers will also discuss how public health partners at all levels can work toward ensuring that every baby is screened.

Presented By:
Stuart K. Shapira, MD, PhD
Associate Director for Science and Chief Medical Officer
National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC

Marci K. Sontag, PhD
Associate Professor, Colorado School of Public Health
University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Campus

Kim Van Naarden Braun, PhD
Epidemiologist, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health
Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders
National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC

Craig A. Mason, PhD
Professor, Education and Applied Quantitative Methods
University of Maine

Watch the live webcast on Tuesday, September 20, at 1:00pm ET. Follow @CDC_eHealth on Twitter for live tweeting during the event, and use the hashtag #CDCGrandRounds to participate. If you are unable to attend, post your questions in the comments below or send to grandrounds@cdc.gov.

For more information on CDC Public Health Grand Rounds, visit http://1.usa.gov/1rzB4JL
“Newborn Screening for Hearing Loss and Critical Congenital Heart Disease”
Tue, September 20, 1:00 PM
https://twitter.com/CDC_eHealth

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CDC scientists with a wide range of expertise come together to work with CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to combat Zika. Learn more how they’ve responded to Zika: 1.usa.gov/29p5SNt
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CDC will participate in this year’s Georgia Bio Innovation Summit conference in Atlanta on 9/28! If you plan to attend the conference, please stop by Exhibit Booth #19 to learn more about CDC and our technologies available for licensing. Not able to attend? Visit our web page to learn more about our work: www.cdc.gov/tto.
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PulseNet, a national network of laboratories, launched in 1996 to help detect and define outbreaks using the DNA of the foodborne bacteria making people sick. See more in CDC’s 70th Anniversary: 7 Decades of Firsts: http://1.usa.gov/29axqXC
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Newborn screening is mandated by each individual state, so tests required in some states may not be required in others. Today’s live webcast of Public Health Grand Rounds discusses how some states have implemented point-of-care newborn screening and the challenges they have faced. Join us at 1:00 pm ET and use the hashtag #CDCGrandRounds on Twitter to ask questions during the event. http://1.usa.gov/1rzB4JL
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Sir,I work in a project of epidemic disease control.I am working public health worker in District health department of gujranwala city.I want to do international job please help me
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In 1991, CDC began development of a national strategic plan for early detection and control of breast and cervical cancers among all American women. See more in CDC’s 70th Anniversary: 7 Decades of Firsts: http://1.usa.gov/29axqXC
CDC’s 70th Anniversary: For 70 years, CDC has put proven science into action to keep Americans safe from health threats. See key moments in CDC history.
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Newborn screening identifies medical conditions that can affect a child's long-term health or survival. Early detection, diagnosis, and intervention can prevent death or disability and enable children to reach their full potential. Join us for the next CDC Public Health Grand Rounds on Tuesday, September 20, at 1:00 pm ET. Follow @CDC_eHealth on Twitter and use the hashtag #CDCGrandRounds to participate in the event. http://1.usa.gov/1rzB4JL
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Are you a health care professional? You can help patients take their blood pressure medication as directed. The latest CDC Vital Signs offers tips on how to simplify blood pressure treatment and work with other health care professionals to improve medication adherence in patients. http://bit.ly/2ckRYyc
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The CDC is dedicated to protecting health & promoting quality of life through prevention and control of disease, injury, and disability. *To review the CDC Comment Policy visit http://go.usa.gov/EOT.
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