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Bryce Anderson
Works at Being a better narcissist
Attended University of Utah
Lives in Salt Lake City, UT
469 followers|132,237 views
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Bryce Anderson

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Here's the cover that +Nick James did for the re-release of my book (soon, very soon).  It is epic, and I've seen him do great cover work for others.  Check out his work at http://nickjam.es .

His mad clicky-blendy-layery-composity-graphicking skillz can be yours for a fair price.  Hit him up, and he'll quote you a rate.
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What a beautiful cover.
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Bryce Anderson

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The inner life of the editor, explained.
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Blogger makes some interesting points.  You can learn from any book, even if you're only learning what not to do.  But I think it makes sense to keep most of your hate-reading to acclaimed authors.  Even if that means reading something iffy like Twilight or genuinely cringeworthy like Fifty Shades.  You know they've developed a following, and figuring out why it's gotten popular can help you figure out how to communicate better with your own audience.

On the other hand, if you find yourself disliking a no-name author, there may not be much there to learn.  Or if you find yourself disliking a famous author, and it's pretty easy to see why (like the blogger's relationship to Margaret Atwood's sometimes disturbing subject matter).

Note: Tangential hate-rant on unnamed book follows.  You have been warned.

So I tried out a book I heard about via BookGorilla.  The prose was a bit stilted, which grated on me.  But the worldbuilding, omigod what a train wreck.  Author, did you give any thought to the logistics of having the whole city show up for their Standard YA Totalitarian Monitoring Procedure on the same day?  Did you give any thought to how your society got from "disaster that wiped out 95% of the population" to "gleaming, modern city laid out in geometric perfection" in a few decades?  Every time I started thinking about how world feature X would work, I came to the conclusion that it probably wouldn't.

Then came the thing that sent the book wherever bits go when they're deleted.  Okay, your protagonist has been more or less kidnapped and enslaved so she can be forced to undergo which has a chance of saving the world, albeit in a handwavey fashion that kinda leaves you questioning Evil YA Totalitarian Government's competence.  But the way the author has set things up so far, the process could involve a high level of squick that the author is rightly hesitant to inflict upon the protagonist.  I was glad she gave herself an out.

But the "out" she gives the protagonist is problematic.  The fact that the option exists doesn't just make it unnecessary to in.  It makes nonsense of Evil YA Totalitarian Government's reasons for kidnapping her in the first place.

I don't know what I'm supposed to learn from this book.  "Don't set up your world in nonsensical ways?"  "Don't introduce story elements that suggest the whole story is unnecessary and your antagonists are doing evil when there's a far more effective and far less intrusive to accomplish their goals?"  While specific advice saying, "Hey, your world doesn't make sense for this reason" is valuable, the general maxim "Write a world that makes sense" doesn't feel helpful.  We're blind to our own worldbuilding problems, because of course we've written a world that seems to make sense to us.

Maybe I'm wrong.  Maybe watching a book utterly fail at some facet of storytelling is the best way to gain insight on how to do it better.  But that's not a thought I'm comfortable with, because I worked very hard on this rant, and the idea totally undermines my point.  So please forget I said anything.

Where was I?  Oh, right.  Before you set a book aside, try to figure out what you can learn from it.  But sometimes all you can learn is, "there's such a thing as a bad book."

Totally unrelated note:  No web designer should ever use a hairline font like Raleway as their text font.  Cuts reading speed in half.  It's fun and modern for a headline font, but for text you need something a bit less slender.
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+Steve Turnbull I'm one too, and maybe it should just be one word: Optimasochist.
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Is that regular old string?  This looks like fun.
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Bryce Anderson
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There's another reading night tonight at the Main Library (downtown), runs from 7-9pm.  http://www.slcpl.lib.ut.us/events/view/2950/

Email editor <AT> bigshinyrobot <DOT> com if you've got something you'd like to read.  2000 words is a good length for a reading.
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Bryce Anderson
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Announcements/Events  - 
 
This Thursday night there's a geeky/authory/creative-writingy gathering at the SLC Public Library.  Hosted by +Bryan Young, author of Lost at the Con.  Come and mingle with like-minded sci-fi geeks.  I'll be there if I don't get any better offers.  :)

http://www.slcpl.lib.ut.us/events/view/2950/
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Have him in circles
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Bryce Anderson

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"Hey!  Kool-aid Cat!"
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Give that cat a shovel, let him go at the whole driveway.
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This makes me happy for some reason.
 
Can you imagine an adventure where the dragon just wants to be one of the girls?
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Bryce Anderson

Writing Opportunities/Conferences  - 
 
Looking for sci-fi stories set in the future envisioned by the 1939 World's Fair.
Call for Submissions: Stories from the World of Tomorrow – the way the future was! Darkhouse Books is seeking stories for an anthology of science fiction stories that take place in the future envisioned by the World's Fair of 1939, known also as “The World of Tomorrow”. NYWorldsFair1939 ...
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Thanks for posting this, +Bryce Anderson. I watched the "New Horizons" video about the General Motors pavilion and got inspired. Story finished now and ready to go. Fingers crossed.
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File this under "Truth is stranger than fiction."  If you tried to include these sorts of feats in your fantasy novel, people would demand a magical explanation, or at least that the archer be an elf.

When you include something in your fiction that people think is impossible, the only way to make it believable is to lay some groundwork to make the reader understand that it really can be done.  That's a tricky thing to do, especially in a high fantasy novel where you can't say "It's not like in the movies."
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I've seen so many other people sharing this, it floors me that my particular instance of sharing it netted me a +238.  Whatever will I spend my Internet point wealth on?
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I watched the The Force Awakens trailer today. Only one scene really stood out for me. Can you guess which one?
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Not sure I see the need for the cross guard, I don't recall ever seeing lightsaber blades slide against each other in any of the films...
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Have him in circles
469 people
Alexei Othenin-Girard's profile photo
Roland Boykin's profile photo
CharityBasic Needs's profile photo
Adam Scull (Eat Sleep Write)'s profile photo
Stephen Hayes's profile photo
Kimberli Grant's profile photo
ginka georgieva's profile photo
Vicky Hennegan's profile photo
Laura Anderson's profile photo
Education
  • University of Utah
    Computer Science, 2004 - 2007
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
The Brycenator, Hey You
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
Story
Tagline
The future is like the past, but moreso.
Introduction
We are but shadows projected onto the inner eyelid of sleeping Cthulhu.  Happy dreaming.
Bragging rights
Wrote The Improbable Rise of Singularity Girl: http://bannedsorcery.com/books/1
Work
Occupation
Whatever earns money to support my writing addiction.
Employment
  • Being a better narcissist
    2008 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Salt Lake City, UT
Previously
Lake Point, UT - San Francisco, CA - Austin, TX - Colorado Springs, CO
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3 reviews