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Bryce Anderson
Works at Being a better narcissist
Attended University of Utah
Lives in Salt Lake City, UT
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Bryce Anderson

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Does your teenager like to read YA adventure stories?  Get a hold of +Jefferson Smith.
 
Hey stream buddies, do any of you have sons or nephews who might be interested?
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<FARNSWORTH_VOICE>Good news, everyone!</FARNSWORTH_VOICE>

TL;DR : The Improbable Rise of Singularity Girl will be re-released on April 15th (with a new cover, better writing, and more jokes).  And the first place you can get it is at StoryBundle.com, packaged with a bunch of other great indie sci-fi and fantasy books courtesy of #ImmerseOrDie.

Now for the TL.

The Improbable Rise of Singularity Girl survived +Jefferson Smith's #ImmerseOrDie treadmill last June.  It was a happy moment for me, because, well, you know how insecure authors are.  Having my own work validated by someone who I felt knew the craft, it felt like a bit of weight fell from my shoulders.  JSmith published his review--my book was actually the first to pass the forty-minute goalpost--then I got a couple dozen sales, and I figured that would be the end of the matter.

I figured too soon.

Months later, Jeff contacted me out of the blue, said he was putting together a StoryBundle.  "A what?" I asked the googles.  Imagine the Humble Bundle for e-books, if that helps.  If that doesn't help, imagine getting a basket of great ebooks for the low, low price of "whatever you want to pay," with some of your money going to charity.  StoryBundle.com offers new baskets every few weeks for the discerning, price-conscious reader.

And Jeff wanted to add my book to the upcoming #ImmerseOrDie basket.

To understand the company my book is in (and I have to say, it's good company) you have to understand #ImmerseOrDie.  Each morning, Jeff hops on his treadmill, with a new ebook loaded and ready to go.  He starts walking, starts reading, and starts charging 'WTFs' whenever something about the book "breaks immersion" (that is, knocks him out of the story).  Once the book gets its third WTF, the timer stops.  He writes a report, telling a bit about the book and saying what knocked it off the Treadmill of Judgment.

But if he makes it to the end of his morning walk (40 minutes) and he's still eager to keep reading, he gets to write a "survivor" report instead.  To see what the reports look like, check out mine: http://creativityhacker.ca/2014/06/26/the-improbable-rise-of-singularity-girl-by-bryce-anderson/

To be clear: Jeff did finish reading each of the books in the bundle to make sure their performance early on wasn't a fluke.  They all kept his interest from start to finish.

Win or lose, all his reports are fair and thoughtful.  As he started the project, I watched with increasing interest, especially after my own book survived.  For perfectly narcissistic reasons, I wanted to know if he was any good at snagging good books out of the river of dreck that indie publishing often becomes.  In my considered, honestly-not-biased-by-the-fact-that-I'm-about-to-make-some-money-here opinion, he is.  When he says an indie book is good, I usually find myself agreeing.

But not always.  I looked at the slate of books and found one glaring exception: The Improbable Rise of Singularity Girl, by Bryce Anderson.  That's an exaggeration.  I was proud of my book when it first came out, and I still think I was right to be.  But when I started reading it again, this time keeping in mind that it was about to go out to perhaps thousands of readers, my inner critic went nuts.  Hence the decision to do the second edition / re-release dance, which I'd previously promised myself I'd never do.  I still feel the first edition was something to be proud of, and well worth my readers' time.  But I'd basically written two books since then, and learned a lot along the way.  I wanted Improbable Rise to reflect my best work, and it no longer did.

Plus, +Nick James was doing a brand new cover for me.  The first cover, beautiful as it was, didn't really scream 'science fiction' the way it needed to.  Between the new cover and the improved writing, I'm putting my best foot forward here.

On April 15th, once you're done filing your taxes, why not celebrate by relaxing with a nice book?  Or eight?  And if you want to help me succeed as an author, or support indie publishing, or just get some social media points from your friends for pointing them to some great indie books, then I'd be grateful if you help spread the word.

Thanks for reading.
 
In the last eight months, I've read over 150 indie books in science fiction and fantasy, separating the strong from the weak, and on April 15 I'll be presenting the eight very best of them—each one a truly top-notch read. If you've ever wanted to gorge yourself on the gems that are hiding in the weeds of indie genre fiction, this will be a great place to scratch that itch. Check out all the details in the comprehensive posting on my site: http://creativityhacker.ca/2015/03/13/storybundle-announcement/

If that all sounds like good news to you, then please consider sharing this post. After that, sit back and wait for the starting gun on Apr 15. Meanwhile, keep your eyes on my stream, because there are one or two more goodies that will be announced as we get closer to launch.
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Oh shit, you're gonna be in a StoryBundle? That's awesome! Something something bigtime.
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Bryce Anderson

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"Hey!  Kool-aid Cat!"
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Give that cat a shovel, let him go at the whole driveway.
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Bryce Anderson

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The inner life of the editor, explained.
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Blogger makes some interesting points.  You can learn from any book, even if you're only learning what not to do.  But I think it makes sense to keep most of your hate-reading to acclaimed authors.  Even if that means reading something iffy like Twilight or genuinely cringeworthy like Fifty Shades.  You know they've developed a following, and figuring out why it's gotten popular can help you figure out how to communicate better with your own audience.

On the other hand, if you find yourself disliking a no-name author, there may not be much there to learn.  Or if you find yourself disliking a famous author, and it's pretty easy to see why (like the blogger's relationship to Margaret Atwood's sometimes disturbing subject matter).

Note: Tangential hate-rant on unnamed book follows.  You have been warned.

So I tried out a book I heard about via BookGorilla.  The prose was a bit stilted, which grated on me.  But the worldbuilding, omigod what a train wreck.  Author, did you give any thought to the logistics of having the whole city show up for their Standard YA Totalitarian Monitoring Procedure on the same day?  Did you give any thought to how your society got from "disaster that wiped out 95% of the population" to "gleaming, modern city laid out in geometric perfection" in a few decades?  Every time I started thinking about how world feature X would work, I came to the conclusion that it probably wouldn't.

Then came the thing that sent the book wherever bits go when they're deleted.  Okay, your protagonist has been more or less kidnapped and enslaved so she can be forced to undergo which has a chance of saving the world, albeit in a handwavey fashion that kinda leaves you questioning Evil YA Totalitarian Government's competence.  But the way the author has set things up so far, the process could involve a high level of squick that the author is rightly hesitant to inflict upon the protagonist.  I was glad she gave herself an out.

But the "out" she gives the protagonist is problematic.  The fact that the option exists doesn't just make it unnecessary to in.  It makes nonsense of Evil YA Totalitarian Government's reasons for kidnapping her in the first place.

I don't know what I'm supposed to learn from this book.  "Don't set up your world in nonsensical ways?"  "Don't introduce story elements that suggest the whole story is unnecessary and your antagonists are doing evil when there's a far more effective and far less intrusive to accomplish their goals?"  While specific advice saying, "Hey, your world doesn't make sense for this reason" is valuable, the general maxim "Write a world that makes sense" doesn't feel helpful.  We're blind to our own worldbuilding problems, because of course we've written a world that seems to make sense to us.

Maybe I'm wrong.  Maybe watching a book utterly fail at some facet of storytelling is the best way to gain insight on how to do it better.  But that's not a thought I'm comfortable with, because I worked very hard on this rant, and the idea totally undermines my point.  So please forget I said anything.

Where was I?  Oh, right.  Before you set a book aside, try to figure out what you can learn from it.  But sometimes all you can learn is, "there's such a thing as a bad book."

Totally unrelated note:  No web designer should ever use a hairline font like Raleway as their text font.  Cuts reading speed in half.  It's fun and modern for a headline font, but for text you need something a bit less slender.
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+Steve Turnbull I'm one too, and maybe it should just be one word: Optimasochist.
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Bryce Anderson

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Is that regular old string?  This looks like fun.
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Bryce Anderson
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Announcements/Events  - 
 
There's another reading night tonight at the Main Library (downtown), runs from 7-9pm.  http://www.slcpl.lib.ut.us/events/view/2950/

Email editor <AT> bigshinyrobot <DOT> com if you've got something you'd like to read.  2000 words is a good length for a reading.
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Have him in circles
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Bryce Anderson

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Who is this Bryce fella?
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Here's the cover that +Nick James did for the re-release of my book (soon, very soon).  It is epic, and I've seen him do great cover work for others.  Check out his work at http://nickjam.es .

His mad clicky-blendy-layery-composity-graphicking skillz can be yours for a fair price.  Hit him up, and he'll quote you a rate.
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What a beautiful cover.
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This makes me happy for some reason.
 
Can you imagine an adventure where the dragon just wants to be one of the girls?
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Bryce Anderson

Writing Opportunities/Conferences  - 
 
Looking for sci-fi stories set in the future envisioned by the 1939 World's Fair.
Call for Submissions: Stories from the World of Tomorrow – the way the future was! Darkhouse Books is seeking stories for an anthology of science fiction stories that take place in the future envisioned by the World's Fair of 1939, known also as “The World of Tomorrow”. NYWorldsFair1939 ...
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Thanks for posting this, +Bryce Anderson. I watched the "New Horizons" video about the General Motors pavilion and got inspired. Story finished now and ready to go. Fingers crossed.
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File this under "Truth is stranger than fiction."  If you tried to include these sorts of feats in your fantasy novel, people would demand a magical explanation, or at least that the archer be an elf.

When you include something in your fiction that people think is impossible, the only way to make it believable is to lay some groundwork to make the reader understand that it really can be done.  That's a tricky thing to do, especially in a high fantasy novel where you can't say "It's not like in the movies."
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I've seen so many other people sharing this, it floors me that my particular instance of sharing it netted me a +238.  Whatever will I spend my Internet point wealth on?
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People
Have him in circles
474 people
marimuthu kannan's profile photo
Clarke Anderson's profile photo
Lou Brom's profile photo
Елена Нестерова's profile photo
Mark Bell's profile photo
Chantelle Griffin's profile photo
Gordon Kildall's profile photo
Fawn Babcock's profile photo
Unbound Stories's profile photo
Education
  • University of Utah
    Computer Science, 2004 - 2007
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
The Brycenator, Hey You
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
Story
Tagline
The future is like the past, but moreso.
Introduction
We are but shadows projected onto the inner eyelid of sleeping Cthulhu.  Happy dreaming.
Bragging rights
Wrote The Improbable Rise of Singularity Girl: http://bannedsorcery.com/books/1
Work
Occupation
Whatever earns money to support my writing addiction.
Employment
  • Being a better narcissist
    2008 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Salt Lake City, UT
Previously
Lake Point, UT - San Francisco, CA - Austin, TX - Colorado Springs, CO
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