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Bryan Vartabedian
Works at Baylor College of Medicine
Attended Baylor College of Medicine
Lives in The Woodlands, TX
942 followers|18,872 views
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The evolution of our profession in a networked world must involve attention to how we think and share in the great wide open.

http://33charts.com/2014/04/medical-leaders-think-out-loud.html
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I think the currency of ideas will be driven by the few. 

IMHO, the medical profession is trained to adhere to proven protocols and guidelines backed by research and statistics.  Thus ideas have little room unless there is science behind it. 

Having said that, there is art in treating patients. So not all is science. 

However, it seems to me that the currency that the new generation will have to earn, is the art of aligning the abundant access of information with those ideas into the proper "context" for patient. 

Physicians that succeed in that role will succeed as physicians. 
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Why The Huffington Post needs more discussion about parasites.....

http://33charts.com/2014/03/worms-huffington-post.html
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Bryan Vartabedian

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It used to be that audiences were only relevant when they were massive.  Most of us still think in these mass media terms.  But the right audience of just a few can change the world.  And it doesn’t have to me more than a dozen.
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One of the advantages I see that physicians have over other professionals and certainly corporations, is that the MD behind their name almost guarantees an audience by default. This is especially true in primary care. In Pediatrics, for example, there is an inherent trust that gets established almost as a default, but still grows over time.

Pediatricians have more time with their audience (and more time to establish trust) than other specialties due to the frequency babies visit the pediatrician, especially the first 5 years of life. And when you add 2 or 3 kids per family, the audience builds a strong bond with the "presenter."

Unfortunately, in my humble opinion, pediatricians are missing out on the advantage they have over others as trusted sources of information with an audience eager to listen to them.

This bond, and trust I'm talking about can change how people view and understand healthcare. But at least in Pediatrics, the world I live in, we have yet to embrace the platform, and the megaphone that the Internet now affords us.

As a specialty, we still insist on changing healthcare inside an examining room, one patient at a time.

It is too bad. Because we already know who is our audience.




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Bryan Vartabedian

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Why a hospital's approach to content has to center on the patient, not the institution.  
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It’s infuriating to feel the subtle criticism of a physician who steps out to make, create, and change.
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Totally true. I love that ZDoggMD is willing to step through the controversy and reach people in ways that are real & important.
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Bryan Vartabedian

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Try this experiment: Take a impactful message from a source, boil it down to 140 characters, then share it on Twitter with a broken link.  

Lots of folks will  share your link.  Is this a problem?
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The Exponential regurgitation of information can be pretty dangerous. More so with those dramatic, exaggerated titles that many sources are now using
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I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it. 
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Today LinkedIn expanded its publishing platform to allow users to create and share long form posts. 
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This week I posted a brief comment on a doctor friend’s social page.  It was a quick thought that, when taken out of context, came across the wrong way. 
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People
In his circles
165 people
Have him in circles
942 people
Meredith Gould's profile photo
Rob Lamberts's profile photo
Marc Katz's profile photo
Nick Dawson's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Public physician, pediatric gastroenterologist
Skills
Communicating big ideas in small spaces
Employment
  • Baylor College of Medicine
    pediatrician, 2004 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
The Woodlands, TX
Previously
Westwood, MA
Links
Story
Tagline
Public physician
Introduction

I teach at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston where I cultivate programs in digital literacy.  I like to think of myself as preparing the next generation of physician for a very different future.  I’m most passionate about how doctors engage and communicate in public spaces.  Since 2005 I've been an active witness to the social health revolution and its impact on doctors and patients.  

Most of my public thinking is centered at 33 charts.  It’s where I explore the weird edges of medicine/technology and narrate the experience of the post-analog physician.  33 charts is my test kitchen for thinking.  33 charts was recently selected to be archived for future generations in the National Library of Medicine.  

Communication is at my core.  Before the Internet I cut my teeth on pulp doing freelance work for magazines such as Parenting and American Baby.  I am the author of Colic Solved - The Essential Guide to Infant Reflux and the Care of Your Crying, Difficult-to-Soothe Baby (Ballantine/Random House, 2007) and First Foods (St. Martin's Press, 2001). I've done a bunch of other cool stuff that I've forgotten at this point.

When I'm not writing or thinking, I read obsessively.

I have an Australian Labradoodle that speaks English.

I like to work really early in the morning.

Bragging rights
I once rode the elevator with Mark Zuckerberg
Education
  • Baylor College of Medicine
    Pediatric GI/nutrition fellowship, 1994 - 1997
  • Baylor College of Medicine
    Pediatrics residency, 1991 - 1994
  • University of Massachusetts Medical School
    Medicine, 1987 - 1991
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married