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Bryan Carnathan
Works at Rectangular Media, LLC
Attended Messiah College
Lives in Selinsgrove, PA, USA
560 followers|268,259 views
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The Canon 7D II and 100-400 L II Get Close to a Royal Tern
            
There was a small flock of royal terns on the Captiva, Florida beach just north of Blind Pass and Sanibel Island. It would have been easy to stand and capture distant photos of the flock resting in the sand, but I was looking for something better. By lying down in the sand and moving forward slowly, the beautiful birds allowed me to get quite close without showing any signs of stress. So close that I had to zoom out somewhat to get the framing I selected for the bird in this photo.
 
That the 100-400 L II focuses so closely is a big benefit when the subject is small and you want to fill the frame with it or a portion of it. The close focusing is also useful in situations such as this one – when I got too close. As I said, there was a flock of birds and I was photographing various birds as their positions and behaviors warranted my attention.
 
A low shooting position often has the benefit of a clean background (the sky in this case) and provides a nice angle on most small birds and animals located on the ground. To make shooting while lying flat in the sand easier, I utilized a NatureScapes Skimmer Ground Pod II. To help darken the sky in the background, I used a circular polarizer filter.
 
Early and late in the day sunlight often provides the best lighting for bird photography, but nice images can be made at other times of the day. This royal tern photo was taken at 11:44 AM. At this time of the day, the sun is near its highest point, making shadows harsh and the color temperature of the light cool. By carefully timing the shutter release, I was able to catch bird positions that minimized shadows (especially on its head) and that included a catchlight in the eye. Sunlight reflecting on sand also helps minimize shadows (though not as well as the snow that was on the ground at home on that date does).
 
With a white bird in full sunlight and under a cloudless sky, the exposure decision was easy. Lock in manual mode settings that included a shutter speed fast enough to stop any movement present (there was lots of action happening), an aperture that provided adequate depth of field and an ISO setting that caused the brightest areas of the photo to be just below blown (pure white) in brightness.
 
The 7D Mark II (http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EOS-7D-Mark-II.aspx) and 100-400 L II (http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-100-400mm-f-4.5-5.6-L-IS-II-USM-Lens.aspx) performed extremely well on this trip. The alert among you will notice that the reported full size pixel dimensions for this image are larger than those native from the 7D Mark II. I framed this bird tight to the top of the frame and used Photoshop's context aware fill to extend the canvas, creating more sky in the final image. This tactic created a modestly higher resolution image overall. Another option for increasing resolution would have been to capture a similarly-focused second frame with more upward angle, taking in much more sky for later stitching to the bird image.
 
I spent hours focusing on these birds and will try to share some additional images when I get time.
 
Gear Used
Canon EOS 7D Mark II
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens
NatureScapes Skimmer Ground Pod II
Circular Polarizer Filter
 
Camera and Lens Settings
360mm  f/8.0  1/1250s  ISO 160  5472 x 3932px

Get more gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#royaltern #tern #canon #canonphotographers #canon7dmarkii #telephoto #nature #naturephotography #wildlife #wildlifephoto #wildlifephotography
#bird #birds #birdphotography #birdphoto #birdsunlimited #beautifulbeautifulbirds #birdsinfocus #birds4all #birdsgallery #hqspbirds #birdsinflight
#usa #unitedstates #florida #sanibel #sanibelisland #captiva
#black #white #blue #orange #photo #photography #showyourbestwork
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Thomas Valiyaveetil's profile photoLeelakrishna yarlagadda's profile photoBismillah Gems's profile photoHQSP Birds's profile photo
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It really is! It is like having one of Canon's big super telephoto lenses in a small, light and relatively inexpensive package.
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Canon 100-400 L II Captures Bahia Honda Railroad Bridge at Sunset

Few lenses have grown so important to me in such a short amount of time as the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens (review: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-100-400mm-f-4.5-5.6-L-IS-II-USM-Lens.aspx). Wildlife has been my first-choice use for this lens, but landscape photography is a very close second on the list (sports will compete with these other two uses as soon as the snow melts and more athletes go outside).
 
I love the great outdoors and landscape photography ties in very well with that love. Landscape photos allow me to take my favorite scenes with me and many hang in my house and studio. Many of these prints are very large (up to 40x60") and I'm always looking for the ultimate image quality. While I'm often using wide angle lenses to capture landscapes, I love using telephoto lenses nearly as much. Narrow angles of view are easy to compose with and, even mediocre sunrises and sunsets can fill the frame with color. The 100-400 L II provides a great focal length range and very impressive image quality, making it the perfect choice for landscape uses.
 
The historic Bahia Honda Rail Bridge spans the channel between Bahia Honda State Park (Bahia Honda Key, mile marker 37 U.S. 1, the Overseas Highway) and Spanish Harbor Key (Florida). After the new highway was constructed, sections of the old bridge were cut away to accommodate boat traffic. The remaining portion of the steel truss construction bridge provides a great silhouette for sunset photos captured at the western end of the state park and the missing portion of the bridge definitely adds a uniqueness to the images captured here.
 
This is a single-frame HDR (http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Photography-Tips/Create-Natural-Looking-HDR-Images.aspx) image. I simply processed the same raw image at two different brightness levels to bring up the ocean brightness slightly.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens
Gitzo GT3542LS Systematic Carbon Fiber Tripod
Arca-Swiss Monoball Z1 Ball Head
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
100mm  f/8.0  1/250s  ISO 100  5760 x 3840px

Click on the image to view large. Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon5dmarkiii #gitzo #telephoto #landscapephotography #usa #unitedstates #florida #floridakeys #bahiahonda #bahiahondastatepark #bahiahondarailroadbridge #railroadbridge #bridge
#sunset #sunsetphotography #photo #photography #showyourbestwork #hdr
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Shadow Hunting

Normally, the ground is covered in detail including grass, leaves, sticks, stones, etc. and that detail is generally on the dark side of brightness. When it snows, those details are covered over and the ground becomes a smooth bright white palette mostly void of detail except possibly an even snow texture. As all kids know so well, what a blank white palette needs is something on it.
 
Shadows are a great option for that something. Especially helpful in this pursuit is that winter brings a low angle sun that casts long shadows even at mid-day. Additionally helpful is that the deciduous trees are bare in the winter and cast clean shadow lines (instead of complete shadows from a leaf canopy).
 
While trees cast great shadows, there are plenty of other options. Look for shadows beside fences (as shown in this example). Make your own shadows using your body (for a shadow selfie) or anything else your creativity can come up with.
 
This winter, if you are fortunate enough to live or travel to a location where there is snow on the ground, take advantage of that blank white palette. And remember, the clock is ticking after a snow storm. Fresher is better in the case of snow.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 Lens
 
Camera and Lens Settings
55mm  f/11.0  1/80s  ISO 100  5760 x 3840px

Click on the image to view large. Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon5dmarkiii #zeiss #winter #snow #telephoto #snowstorm #shadows #linesinthesnow #usa #unitedstates #pennsylvania #selinsgrove #photo #photography
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Muhammed L Manneh's profile photo
 
hi
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Shenandoah National Park White-tailed Buck

This Shenandoah NP buck was feeding in a small clearing in the oak forest. One of my favorite wildlife photo subject orientations is directly side-on with the head facing forward, or even better, slightly toward the camera. This particular deer has a slight u-shaped stance that I like.

I also like that the deer's legs are somewhat evenly spaced, adding a natural repeating pattern to the shot. That three of the frame borders are clear of heavy contrasting lines is yet another bonus.
 
I often prefer to shoot level with the animal, but in this case, I had a better background when shooting at a slight downward angle. Click on the image to view large.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens
Gitzo GM5540 6x Carbon Fiber Monopod
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
311mm  f/4.5  1/400s  ISO 125  5760 x 3840px

Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon5dmarkiii #gitzo #telephoto #supertelephoto #nature #wildlife #animals #trees #oaktrees #oak #deer #buck #bigbuck #whitetail #whitetaileddeer #whitetailbuck #antlers #usa #unitedstates #virginia #shenandoah #shenandoahnationalpark #nationalpark #fall #leaves #brown #photo #photography
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erlinda dillman's profile photo
 
lovely photo!
it's like i am there looking at this buck...
post i like so much...
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The Power of Otus f/1.4: Bee on Orange Sunflower

Sunflowers, with their large size and bright colors, make great photo subjects. Add a bee to take the overall composition one step further.
 
For this image, I moved in close to the foreground flower, keeping it completely in the frame which places the center about 1/3 into the frame. I then moved to position a similar flower in the background. Again, that flower is fully contained in the frame and the green leaves anchor the bottom of the composition.
 
The shallow depth of field created by the combination of an 85mm focal length and f/1.4 aperture draws a viewer's eye directly to the bee and to the sharp flower petals (with strong contrast also pulling the viewer's eye to this location).

This image is razor sharp across the back of the bee (thanks to the Zeiss Otus 85), but details quickly soften in front of and behind that plane of sharp focus.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 Lens
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
85mm  f/1.4  1/640s  ISO 100  5760 x 3840px

Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canon5dmarkiii #canonphotographers #zeiss #zeissotus #otus #telephoto #landscapephotography #flower #flowerphotography #sunflower #sunflowerphoto #bee #bumblebee #usa #unitedstates #pennsylvania #fall #photo #photography #orange #brown #green #bokeh
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Richard Maeberry's profile photoChris Thompson's profile photoJim Leonidas's profile photoCynthia Hammerstrom's profile photo
2 comments
 
Hey Brian, I like the feeling of weightlessness that this photo suggests! The details, as well as the out-of-focus areas are all superb! The colors are paired beautifully, too!
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Canon 7D II Captures Bald Eagle in Flight at Conowingo Dam

I generally prefer to avoid the hand-of-man in my wildlife images and when setting up at the Conowingo Dam I positioned myself to best avoid the dam, wires and other non-natural objects in my backgrounds. But ... those man-made objects were not always avoidable and ... the Conowingo Dam is a big reason why the eagles are there in the first place. And, it is a landmark among bird photographers. It is not unusual to find half a million dollars worth of gear on the shoreline below this dam. So, I find it fitting to include the dam in the background of a bald eagle image. In this example, I like the even pattern of the heavily blurred dam in the background.
 
The 7D II performed very well this day. I used the 600 L II IS lens for maximum reach and used the 1.4x III extender some of the time. The 1344mm effective angle of view proved challenging for tracking the erratically-flying eagles and I eventually removed the extender. However, some of my favorite shots of the day would not have been nearly as good without the extender in place. So, the with or without extender decision must be weighed in light of circumstances.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 7D Mark II
Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Lens
Gitzo GT3542LS Systematic Carbon Fiber Tripod
Wimberley Tripod Head II
Canon EF 1.4x III Extender
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
840mm  f/5.6  1/1600s  ISO 1600  5174 x 3449px

Get more gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#photography #birdphotography #birdsgallery #nature #wildlife #canon #canon7dmarkii
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Well I'll catch u one day

J

Sent from my iPad

Jack Douglas
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Have him in circles
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Brooklyn Bridge and New York City

Capturing Cityscapes During the "Perfect 15" Subset of the Blue Hour

Last Thursday, I took the Canon 11-24mm f/4L Lens (http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-11-24mm-f-4L-USM-Lens.aspx) to New York City for a late-winter day. New York City is one of the most photogenic cities on the planet and it remains similarly so at all times of the year. Advantages of shooting architecture and cities when it is uncomfortably cold out include fewer people to interfere with your compositions, fewer photographers competing for the same shooting locations and easier isolation of composition-enhancing people while doing street photography.
 
Scouting
 
New York City is extremely large and I doubt that anyone will ever exhaust all of the photo possibilities of this location. For sure I will not. This means that pre-trip scouting is especially important. Using available online resources to visualize the location's available compositions maximizes one's photo time. These resources include maps, satellite imagery, The Photographer's Ephemeris, reviewing photos others captured at the potential location, etc.
 
Part of this scouting involves determining the direction of sunrise or sunset as this effects the look of the image at a key time of the day for cityscape photography. The sun rising or setting to the side of an image will be the most challenging with the sky taking on a brightness gradient from one side of the image to the other. If the sun is rising or setting behind you, buildings will reflect the brighter sky and the background sky will be darker in relation to the buildings. The sky may also become pink above the horizon in this situation. If the sun is rising or setting in front of you, the sky will be brighter in relation to the buildings, but the building lights will become more pronounced. Both latter options are great. My choice in this example was the in-front-of-me sunset.
 
On Location
 
Arriving at the location early to verify the choice made during pre-trip scouting is highly recommended. You never know what you might find upon arrival (such as a large construction project), so arrive early enough to implement plan B if necessary. Yes, have at least plan B and having plan C and D is a very good idea. Arriving early also provides the best opportunity to score the perfect shooting location.
 
On this particular cold evening, there was no competition for shooting location and to completely avoid the chance of people walking into my composition (and to avoid an ugly sign and construction fencing), I setup so that no foreground was visible in the frame. To do so at the focal length I wanted to use (24mm – the longest available on the lens I was evaluating) required extending my tripod down through the curved East River fencing.
 
The Right Time of Day Makes the Difference
 
City lights do not come on (or become visible) until it gets somewhat dark and these lights are a key to one of my favorite cityscape looks. The lights add life to the buildings and while cityscapes can be captured in complete darkness, I find that some color remaining in the sky makes a better image.
 
The "Blue Hour", by definition, lasts for 1 hour just before sunrise and just after sunset (use your online tool or phone app to find out when it happens at your shooting location on your chosen shooting day). However, the perfect shooting time, when the sky color balances with the city lights (and possibly reflections), lasts for closer to 15 minutes within that hour. I'll dub this time period the "Perfect 15" and I can usually narrow my ultimate preference down to a subset of that duration. While the Perfect 15 are ideal for capturing a variety of image types, cityscapes are an especially great use of this short period of time.
 
While it is possible to capture a number of compositions within the Perfect 15, I find it best to concentrate on one composition at the key time of the day. Fifteen minutes sounds like a very adequate amount of time to capture one image, but I assure you, it is often not. Here is why:
 
At this time of the day, each f/11 image requires 30 seconds of exposure (roughly) followed by 30 seconds of long exposure noise reduction dark frame capture. Add a few seconds for mirror lockup and multiply each shot by two or three for exposure bracketing (if warranted for HDR - http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Photography-Tips/Create-Natural-Looking-HDR-Images.aspx) and those Perfect 15 minutes begin to look very short.
 
Reflect a Great Scene for a Better Image
 
Want to make a great scene even better? Reflect it in water to double the greatness. Many major cities exist because of the water located by them, and cityscapes often look best when reflected in water. However, these waterways are typically large enough and have enough wind and boat traffic on them to never permit a mirror-smooth reflection. Reflections in rough water can look OK (though somewhat distracting), but making a smooth blur of the water via a long exposure is usually my preference. The Perfect 15 happens at the right time of day for long water-blurring exposures, but the boat traffic presents a problem.
 
Even during a 30 second exposure, the waves created by a large boat are going to create possibly-undesirable lines in the final image. Also, at this time of the day, boats are required to have lights on and those lights show very clearly as long streaks in the image. Sometimes these light streaks can be removed in post processing (try the content-aware healing brush in Photoshop), but lights on the larger boats (such as ferries) streak across the city details, becoming much more difficult to remove. When this happens, an available option is to simply leave the light streaks remaining in the final image, adding an effect. Most of the time, I find this effect undesirable. Correcting the uneven reflections caused by 30-second wave blurs is usually very challenging.
 
The Perfect 15 is Short for Even One Image
 
So, in addition to the over-1-minute exposure captures along with similar durations for exposure bracketed shots (for potential HDR use), a boat moving through an image can cut the remaining available time drastically. A tug boat pushing a barge through the Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Skyline scene takes a couple of minutes and the waves don't settle for a period of time after that. The East River Ferry is much faster, but it also makes significant waves. Boat traffic alone took a major chunk out of my Perfect 15 on this day.
 
Does the Tide Matter?
 
If your city's waterway is tidal-influenced and water-level subjects, especially in the foreground (such as pilings), are in your frame, make sure that your capture is ideally timed with the tide. Use the tide charts available for your location to determine this.
 
The Weather Matters
 
If it were raining, snowing or foggy, I would not likely have been able to see the city I was photographing, so yes, the weather matters. Aside from being able to see the primary subjects, what the weather is providing becomes decreasingly important for cityscape photography at these times of the day. If you want the sunset to add a significant interest to the sky, there needs to be some clouds to catch color and an opening in the sky allowing the sun to illuminate those clouds. Since I wanted the city itself to be the primary interest in my image and because I wanted a high-percentage weather forecast, I chose a perfectly clear day for this trip. A clear sky provides a great blue color over the city and reflects in the water below it.
 
Seeing Stars and Aircraft
 
Cities are usually bright enough to overwhelm the visibility of most stars, but if you happen to be able to see the stars in your images, 30 seconds is probably going to give you some star trails. What to do with the handful of visible stars and their short trails is a matter of taste, but they appeared to be an anomaly in this image. There were not enough stars showing to make them appear as part of the scene, so I removed them.
 
Along with waterways, large cities usually have busy airports and air traffic very frequently becomes part of these images. The flashing lights from this aircraft generally create long dotted lines through a cityscape captured during 30 the seconds exposures typically in use during the Perfect 15. Again, the choice of what to do about these inevitable additions to the image is up to you. Fortunately, most of the aircraft are flying above the city and can be easily removed in Photoshop.
 
Replacing Light Bulbs
 
The waterways commonly found by large cities frequently have bridges over them, those bridges are often landmarks that you will want to incorporate into your images and those bridges commonly have many lights on them. The Brooklyn Bridge is one such bridge. After a severe winter, numerous light bulbs were in need of replacement. I'm sure that there had been very few maintenance crew members volunteering to scale the bridge under the severe temperatures (along with plenty of snow and ice) NYC had for many months prior, but I felt the missing lights negatively impacted the image and took the liberty of replacing the bulbs myself (in post of course).
 
Note that, while often the highest location in a city, bridges would seem to be great vantage points for cityscape photography during the Perfect 15. Unfortunately, for bridges with traffic on them, this is not the case. The amount of movement on most bridges with vehicular traffic is incredible (especially the large suspension bridges) and long exposure images captured from such bridges are typically very blurry.
 
This New York City Image
 
While reviewing the Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Lens, I wanted to put some on-location hours behind this lens and decided that Brooklyn Bridge Park, just across the East River from downtown Manhattan, would be a good destination. I arrived early in the afternoon, spent an hour or so selecting what I thought was the ideal composition for capture during the Perfect 15 and then explored the area photographically.
 
About 45 minutes before sunset, I came back and anchored myself into the selected shooting location. I setup the camera, perfected the framing using a completely level camera (keeping the buildings vertically straight) and then established the proper focus distance setting. While I have yet to take a miss-autofocused image with this lens, I wanted no chance of that happening when the scene became dark. I used autofocus to get the initial setting, switched to manual focus mode and took a verification image.
 
While my selected image was captured 41 minutes after sunset, I captured images periodically before entering the Perfect 15. Some of these images are very nice and I'm glad to have them. More importantly, these images allowed me to monitor the exposure settings and how they were changing. There was no question about what settings I should be using when the ideal shooting time came.
 
While I did some bracketing and captured many exposures before, through and after the Perfect 15, everything came together in one image this time. The boat traffic stopped long enough for the waves to even out. The brightness in the sky leveled with the brightness of the city lights and the brightness of the reflection seems just right to me.
 
Aside from some of the tweaks I mentioned already (such as replacing burned out light bulbs), this image is basically right out of the camera. I shoot with the Neutral Picture Style selected in-camera to get a lower contrast histogram to best show the camera's available dynamic range and how I'm making use of it. Because this style's low contrast is not typically what I'm processing for, my usual first post processing step is to select Standard Picture Style. I added some saturation and turned the sharpness setting down to "1". Even with a very low "1" sharpness setting, all details in this image are tack sharp. Awesome lens (learn more about the lens here: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-11-24mm-f-4L-USM-Lens.aspx).
 
A majority of photographers and other observers pack it in when the sun dips below the horizon, but the show is just getting started at sunset. Stick around. If the sun is visible in the sky, unfortunately, the best AM photo time may be in the past. This is the time to make plans for tomorrow. Try shooting during the blue hour and learn what your "Perfect 15" is.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Lens
Gitzo GT3542LS Systematic Carbon Fiber Tripod
Arca-Swiss Monoball Z1 Ball Head
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
24mm  f/11.0  30s  ISO 100  5760 x 3840px

Click on the image to view large. Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon5dmarkiii #gitzo #cityscape #cityscapephotography #usa #newyork #newyorkcity #manhattan #brooklyn #brooklynbridge #bridge #cityskyline #bluehour #blue #sunset #sunsetphotography #longexposure #longexposurephotography #night #nightphotography #photo #photography #showyourbestwork #city #citylights #downtown
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Juan Pablo Bialade's profile photoLeonel Hernandez's profile photo
 
I love the composition +Bryan Carnathan great capture!
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The 7D II and 100-400 L II Rocked in SW Florida

I took my own advice (http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Pictures/Picture.aspx?Picture=2012-03-06_08-14-45) and left the crazy cold N 40° latitude (-4° F/-20° C) for the warmer weather of Florida and just over a week of (primarily) bird photography. Although I had a 5D Mark III and 1D X along, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II was glued to my hand for most of this trip and the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens was glued to the camera most of that time. As noted in the title, this combination rocked and with relatively-cooperative birds, my take-home is a bit voluminous.
 
The subject shown here is a Great Blue Heron in breeding plumage. To capture this image, my first priority was to get in line between the sun and the bird with the low, late-day sun creating good subject lighting. By maneuvering to a slightly lower vantage point than the bird, I was able to create a background composed completely of blue sky. No distractions there.
 
A big challenge remaining was to get the bird properly aligned for a pleasing composition. A side-on angle to the bird with the head straight or turned slightly towards the camera usually works great. The challenge in getting that angle was that the bird, especially its head and neck, was constantly moving. I selected the top-right AF point in the center block of AF points (closely aligned with the bird's eye) and when the bird was in a position that worked for me, I quickly captured the image.
 
I was shooting handheld for maneuverability and setup speed reasons. The 7D II and 100-400 L II combo's size and weight are especially nice for this type of shooting.
 
Some are asking if the 7D II images are sharp enough for serious work and I can assure you that the answer is "Yes." EOS 7D II images are very sharp. Because ultimate image sharpness capabilities are not completely discernible from reduced-size images, I have made the full-size version of this image available for download. Get more information here: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Pictures/Picture.aspx?Picture=2015-02-23_17-10-47
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 7D Mark II
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
182mm  f/8.0  1/500s  ISO 100  5472 x 3648px

Click on the image to view large. Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon7dmarkii #telephoto
#bird #birds #birdphotography #birdphoto #birdsunlimited #beautifulbeautifulbirds #birdsinfocus #birds4all #birdsgallery #hqspbirds #heron #greatblueheron
#usa #florida #southwestflorida #swflorida #captiva #sanibel #sanibelisland #photo #photography #showyourbestwork
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HQSP Birds's profile photodawn stout's profile photo
 
This beautiful picture has been shared at +HQSP Birds. Thanks for your contribution & have a nice day!
Shared by +Dilip Mundkur
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Bryan Carnathan

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Patterns Under the Ice

I shared this picture as part of the Winter Photography Tips (http://www.the-digital-picture.com/News/Default.aspx?Cat=Winter-Photography-Tips) series. This tip is titled Get Out of Your Comfort "Mode" and can be found here: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Pictures/Picture.aspx?Picture=2014-01-08_16-44-40

Click on the image to view large. Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon5dmarkiii #gitzo #sigma #macro #patterns #ice #snow #winter #white #cold #frozen #stream #usa #unitedstates #pennsylvania #Selinsgrove #photo #photography
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I Don't Shoot Black and White, Except

While I love black and white in interior and graphic design, I am about as interested in creating black and white images as I am in watching black and white movies. I view black and white photography as a last resort for not being able to find good color. If a scene does not lend itself to a color photo, I usually move on looking for one that does.
 
I need to emphasize the "I view" part of that sentence. I am only referencing my personal interest level in black and white photography. Everyone has their own photographic interests and if B&W photography is your thing, I say "Go for it!" If everyone was exactly like me, this would be a boring world.
 
Photography has very few "laws" and my black and white aversion is not one of them. One exception I make to my no-monochromatic rule is when a found scene is monochromatic and winter landscapes often qualify as that. For example and as illustrated in this image, a blanket of snow over a hardwood forest under a cloudy sky is a common monochromatic winter scene. You are looking at a full color image and in this case, I'm into black and white.
 
When shooting a monochromatic scene, there are two colors to work with. Thus, contrast, lines and focus take on an elevated importance in composition. With the entire scene in sharp focus, my eye is drawn directly to the area of strongest contrast which in this case is the cluster of front-most tree trunks. The balance of these trees aid in leading the viewer's eyes to this location or to the similar trunks diminishing in size in the background.
 
Trees laden with snow pull the image toward the white side of black and white and capturing such requires a sense of urgency as often the snow does not remain on tree branches for long. A light wind clears the branches as does some direct sunlight warming the branches enough to cause the snow to become slippery, inducing its fall. Sometimes the best time to photograph a snowstorm is while it is happening and the falling snow also pulls the image even further toward white. Protection for your camera during the snow storm can be as simple as the umbrella used for this image capture.
 
Summary: Use this winter to increase your black and white portfolio.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens
Gitzo GT3541LS 6x Carbon Fiber Tripod
Arca-Swiss Monoball Z1 Ball Head
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
24mm  f/11.0  1/20s  ISO 100  5760 x 3840px

Get more camera gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canonphotographers #canon5dmarkiii #gitzo #wideangle #landscapephotography #snow #snowing #snowstorm #snowladen #tree #trees #hickorytree #hickory #bw #blackandwhite #usa #unitedstates #pennsylvania #selinsgrove #monochrome #black #white #winter #photo #photography
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Sven Tunell's profile photoJeff Templeton's profile photoBryan Carnathan's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Sven Tunell +Jeff Templeton Actually, making snow colorful is an interesting idea. :)
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Finding Southwest USA Landscape in Pennsylvania

My life does not currently afford me to constantly be flying to exotic locations, so I'm continuously looking for opportunities closer to home to give photo gear a workout. One landscape type not readily found in my home base of Pennsylvania is the water-eroded bare-earth look so common in the American Southwest. After gaining permission to photograph at a local limestone quarry after hours, I came upon a huge screenings pile (a small mountain really). The fine stone was fast-eroding and the erosion created a very Southwest-appearing landscape.
 
After scouting the pile and trying many good perspectives, I came to prefer this one. I moved in close to one of the wider areas of non-erosion and framed to let the strongly-contrasting lines (courtesy of shadows from a late-day sun) move through the frame in a pleasing manner. I didn't use the widest focal length available to me to prevent the background details from becoming too small.
 
If I hadn't told you, where would you have said this image was captured?
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens
Gitzo GT3542LS Systematic Carbon Fiber Tripod
Arca-Swiss Monoball Z1 Ball Head
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
27mm  f/11.0  1/30s  ISO 100  5760 x 3840px

Get more gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#canon #canon5dmarkiii #gitzo #landscapephotography #ground
#usa #unitedstates #pennsylvania #southwest #southwestusa #summer #quarry #erosion #photo #photography #warmlight #sweetlight #orange #bluesky
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Partially Cloudy Partial Lunar Eclipse at 1200mm

It seems that, every time there is an astronomical event scheduled, the sky turns cloudy where I am. I'm sure that this is one of Murphy's laws, but ... sometimes everything works out anyway.
 
This particular lunar eclipse was happening early in the morning and I setup my gear the evening before. After checking the weather report immediately prior to going to bed, I turned off the alarm. The odds of the cloud cover clearing were very low and I decided that a clear mind from a solid night of sleep was the wiser decision.
 
Fortunately, my Mother-In-Law was wiser than I was (or more excited about the event) and, upon seeing some clearing in the sky, she called me at 4:30 AM. I crawled out of bed, dressed warmly, hauled the ready-to-go gear out to the front yard and found a chair to sit on. I established the focus distance and changed the lens to MF. I then established the exposure needed to keep the moon very slightly darker than blown (mostly avoiding pure white/blinkies on the LCD). The clouds indeed cleared (mostly) by the time of the event and I was able to capture many good shots.
 
As is generally the case with landscape photography, I had to embrace what the weather provided me and in this case, some remaining clouds moved across the moon at times during the eclipse. The brightness of the moon was much for the clouds to remain visible in the frame most of the time (except when the moon was very obscured), but I wanted to show the clouds in some images with the moon only slightly obscured. Thus, I used an HDR technique involving multiple exposures stacked and merged in Photoshop.
 
The result of this particular image is that the eclipsed portion of the moon is not as dark (due to the presence of the clouds) as those captured without clouds, but the clouds appearing to radiate from the moon yields a different look to this infrequent occurrence.
 
Obviously, for this lunar eclipse, I opted to fill the frame with just the moon vs. including a landscape in the frame. The 600mm f/4L IS II is a much-appreciated part of my kit, and this was an instance where the 2x extender proved useful.
 
Gear Used:
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Lens
Gitzo GT3542LS Systematic Carbon Fiber Tripod
Wimberley Tripod Head II
Canon EF 2x III Extender
 
Camera and Lens Settings:
1200mm  f/8.0  1/200s  ISO 500  5760 x 3840px

Get more gear and photo information at http://www.the-digital-picture.com/

#photography #landscapephotography #moon #moonphoto #eclipse #lunareclipse #canon #canon5dmarkiii
22
Juan Pablo Bialade's profile photoBryan Carnathan's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Juan Pablo Bialade  Thanks! Experience is definitely helpful, but ... the settings are not too hard. The light is not changing fast (though it changes a lot over the >1 progression of the eclipse), so I used a manual exposure setting. I started with a close estimate and adjusted based on the histogram. You could also have used spot metering with significant +EV dialed in. Normal tripod settings were also preset: 2-sec self-timer with mirror lockup. Live view and MF is great for focusing on the moon, but the moon is bright enough to AF on also. Since the distance to the moon does not change, I locked in the focus distance once certain that I had it right.
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Founder of DSLR camera and lens review site The-Digital-Picture.com
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  • Messiah College
    Computer Science, Business, 1983 - 1987
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Brian Carnathan
Bryan Carnathan's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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