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Broc Seib
Works at SendTree
Lives in Lafayette, IN
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Broc Seib

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When spawning a new isolate, why must the 'message' argument be mandatory?

static Future<Isolate> spawn(Function entryPoint, message, {bool paused: false})

It seems to me that there are plenty of applications where you might employ concurrency and you really don't care about inter-isolate communication. Heck, I might even ignore the Future that it returns.

This feels like a place in the API design where less would be more.
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Florian Loitsch's profile photoBroc Seib's profile photo
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Thanks +Florian Loitsch, that sheds some light on it.

What's wrong with a named optional argument for message? Seems appropriate. Otherwise when you read the API, you must investigate what a SendPort is, and then a ReceivePort, and then conclude that there must be some kind of intercommunication thing possible. And then the worst part: you have to make decision about what to pass into that argument. Do I mock up an object that I'll just throw away? Try passing a null? The whole mental exercise is a superfluous act if you never intend to do inter-isolate communication. Plus in the end you are having to actively write code (the null) to say ignore that very thing I didn't want to have to know about in the first place. A good design means I only have to become of aware of what I necessarily need to become aware of.

Seems like a opportunity to reduce the surface area of all that is needed to be known in order to jump in and use the language. Even if it is a teensie bit of surface area.

I'll be sure to check my returned Future too. ;-)
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Broc Seib

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Now we can eliminate our mp3 library on our home raid box. :-)
 
Google Play Music and Sonos. We’re about to make beautiful music together: http://www.sonos.com/googleplaymusic

#googleplay   #music   #sonos  
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Keep putting off git? Learn more about git and github on Tuesday, April 22. The talk will be on campus at Purdue, in Lawson.

GLOSSY and the Purdue Linux Users Group (PLUG) welcome GitHub to Greater Lafayette to explain the use of Git and GitHub for version control and project management.
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Patch your OpenSSL systems!
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Check the date on your build:
$ openssl version -a
OpenSSL 1.0.1 14 Mar 2012
built on: Mon Apr  7 20:33:29 UTC 2014
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less is more #ftw
 
How to make your spreadsheets less terrible. #excel #tables
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What characteristics of Javascript had to be preserved in Dart? E.g., its asynchronous nature with callbacks.

Conversely, what "potholes" were smoothed over? E.g., data types. (I know this is very broad question that pretty much describes all of Dart. But I'm looking for some high-level bullet points.)

I'm giving a presentation and would like to discuss how the browser is a critical target for Dart, which means Javascript is the least common denominator for executing anything.

Any references or pointers are appreciated.
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george oloo's profile photoYannick Sirjean's profile photoBroc Seib's profile photoDavid Kopec's profile photo
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Dart doesn't permit function overloading. Does anyone know the design decision/tradeoff behind this? Does this just simplify life for dart2js, or is there some other underlying limitation? Or was it just unwanted?
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At this point, the probability is close to one that every target has had its private keys extracted by multiple intelligence agencies. The real question is whether or not someone deliberately inserted this bug [...]
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Beautifully done iOS game. Alas, no Android version.
http://ustwo.com/blog/monument-valley-out-now/
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Great lessons in design.
 
This may useful to learn about designs. A easy way !
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for the artists we know
 
I fluctuate, but I am hopeful!
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In his circles
540 people
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366 people
Emilio Bravo's profile photo
Rob Searle's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
IT Entrepreneur
Skills
Software Engineering
Employment
  • SendTree
    Founder, 2012 - present
  • Gentomi, Inc.
    Founder, 2008 - present
  • Pynco, Inc.
  • Purdue University
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
I am very passionate about creating software. It's what I love doing most.
Introduction

In 2008, I set out on my own, founding Gentomi, Inc. I am currently engaged in bootstrapping the business SendTree, which is a cloud based communication tool that can send instant messages via telephone, text, email, and social networks, all with a single "send" button. In this effort I've become adept with AppEngine, Twilio API, GWT, AngularJS, and leveraging some newer HTML5/CSS3 features.

Prior to setting out on my own, I spent 13 years creating software at Purdue University. In 1995 I was surprised to find Purdue as my employer. I had made connections with the Computing Center years earlier as an undergraduate. I was later recruited to come back to Purdue and work on some cool software projects, and I couldn't resist.

Before I left, my position at Purdue was in the Rosen Center for Advanced Computing, where they provide computing support for academic research. I was the principal software developer for the Purdue Vulcan project through its first release. This project is of significant importance in order for good policies and decisions to be made concerning climate change. This project determined the high-resolution whereabouts of carbon emissions within the United States, a great improvement over prior known resolutions. I was responsible for the design and implementation of the software that aggregated all the data into its high resolution form. [Here's a fancy YouTube video driven by the resulting data.] This particular project involved large amounts of data, and required distributed computing on a cluster in order to create the final information in its aggregated form.

Before working for the Rosen Center, I worked for 7 years in Purdue's Instructional Computing Division, a group responsible for the 70+ labs and 2000+ machines located around campus for student use. During this period, I gained responsibility for managing a group of 9 software developers. I was responsible for: 1) delivering software projects, 2) providing technical guidance and mentoring, 3) interviewing and hiring, and 4) assignment of salary, wages, and bonuses. This group developed the web infrastructure, databases, and applications used to drive the operations of the labs. [This was an excellent, very talented group to work with.]

Prior to employment at Purdue, I worked as an engineer at Pynco, Inc. from 1992 to 1995. I redesigned a mechanically driven aircraft altimeter (CPU 66) into a complete solid-state, microcontroller driven altimeter. I designed and constructed the new enclosure, computing circuitry, and software. This new altimeter required real-time software techniques, and a handcrafted operating system. [Yes, I wrote a custom operating system for the 68332 microcontroller...]

Also while at Pynco during those years, I helped develop a small CNC station to automate machining of tiny glass parts. This later evolved into the use of large standard CNC equipment, which I programmed to machine the same glass parts. This manufacturing process was significant in Pynco’s early success, and remains as the basis for their primary business today. In 2008, I began serving on the Board at Pynco. This followed the untimely death of my father, Jim Seib, who founded Pynco in 1987.

I graduated from Purdue University in 1993 with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. I still enjoy creating a circuit once in a while. I designed and built my own circuit to help remotely monitor and reboot some hardware located in Detroit, MI.

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Home has always had prime number street addresses: 103 University; 2801 Kossuth; 47 Hindes; 619 Bur Oak
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Currently
Lafayette, IN
Previously
Williams, IN - Brisbane, Australia - Lafayette, IN
I had the taramosalata as an appetizer, and it was simply outstanding. I don't think it is on their menu. Don't miss trying this one. For dinner I ordered the Chef's plate, to sample many of their dishes. This plate has a *lot* of food, so plan to take some home. Everything was very good. I felt the standout on that plate was the Moussaka. The other standout was the side of green beans! They were fantastic. We didn't have room for dessert, but some of the coffee desserts sounded great. I noticed two other things on their menu: 1) a kids menu 2) a lot of gluten free choices. The staff were friendly, helpful, and on top of things. Just great all around. Can't wait to go again.
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Food: ExcellentDecor: Very goodService: Excellent
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reviewed a year ago
Hours of operation would be helpful on this page. I called the 800 number (on 7/27/2012) to ask, and this location is open until 8pm. Also, if you are shipping something, bring a government issued ID.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
3 reviews
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I had a prawn jalfrezi dish that had phenomenal flavors, including whole cardamom and cinnamon.
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago