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Broc Seib
Works at SendTree
Lives in Lafayette, IN
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Broc Seib

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Garfield minus Garfield. Brilliant.
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Kevin Colby's profile photo
 
So much of this had me in stitches.
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It's not surprising to me that many people don't understand the security risk of plugging anything into their computer or device. Evidently, a few hundred USB drives strewn about looks like a pretty good attack vector. 😶
 
Have you ever found a USB drive left behind in a restaurant or parking lot, or perhaps a  library? Did you pick it up and plug it into your computer in order to find a way to return it? Among the cybersecurity community, there is anecdotal evidence that many people, whether behaving altruistically or due to social engineering, will indeed plug a found USB drive into their computer, exposing themselves (and potentially entire systems) to cyberattack.

But does does this kind of attack actually work or is it merely a myth? To put this attack to the test, researchers from the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign and the University of Michigan, along with Google anti-abuse & security researcher +Elie Bursztein, dropped nearly 300 USB sticks on the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus and measured who plugged in the drives.

They found that users picked up, plugged in, and clicked on files in 48% of the drives dropped. Furthermore, users did so quickly: the first drive was connected in under six minutes! Head over to Elie's blog, where he summarizes the study, highlights the key findings, looks at what motivates people to plug in USB sticks, and discusses possible mitigations to improve USB security.
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Here's a nice little story about a grandfather, his granddaughter, and the marshmallow test.
Answer by Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley, author "Now, The Physics of Time" (2016)
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I thought today would be an appropriate day to recognize Simon Plouffe's spigot algorithm that can find the n-th (hex/binary) digit of pi.

Take the time to read Simon's account on how his discovery was treated. https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.math.symbolic/a3kVKVYJhgc

#piday
 
Tonight I found an old fax that I had exchanged with my Dad back in 2006. I showed him this really cool identity for Pi that I had found online, discovered by @114063566958775006350 in 1995.

There are many identities for Pi in existence, some very old. But this "new" one I find especially beautiful. It is a closed-form expression, and can be used to find the nth digit of Pi (base-16) without doing all the work for all the digits leading up to the nth digit.

There is a paper published in 1997 describing the formula in more detail. Sadly, the credit for Plouffe's discovery was unscrupulously taken by the first two authors of this publication, Bailey and Borwein. Plouffe shared his regret for seeking their co-authorship: http://goo.gl/RI8R1

For this injustice I suggest we refuse to recognize the nomenclature "Bailey Borwein Plouffe Formula" (a.k.a. BBP formula) and refer to it as the "Plouffe Identity", and aptly abbreviate it "PI"!

In any case, I was glad to rediscover this while going through old analog papers, and I got to think about my Dad and his disdain of such injustices in life.

I encourage you to give this post a share. :-) #pi
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Work in progress from our 11 yr old.
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Looks like she could belong to the Downtown Abbey cast. Excellent!
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I'd like to see this nightly compilation of CSS prefixes integrated into the caniuse.com database.

/cc +Alexis Deveria
This page automatically computes from various sources an object showing all prefixed or unprefixed properties parsed by various rendering engines. The sources are the following ones, retrieved once a day: WebKit: https://trac.webkit.org/export/HEAD/trunk/Source/WebCore/css/CSSPropertyNames.in ...
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Have him in circles
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Broc Seib

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If you read or watched "Into the Wild", you know the story about Chris McCandless, who took himself into the Alaskan wilderness in the spring of 1992 to leave society and live off the land. In the fall of 1992, Chris died from eating the wrong plant.

Jon Krakauer, the author of the book "Into the Wild" just shared his latest research regarding McCandless's death, 20 years after his book was originally published. It seems Krakauer likes to get the facts right. He tells the story of his investigation of the plant(s) involved, and how they were tested for alkaloids as a toxin, with no luck finding a smoking gun.

In 2012 Krakauer got a new lead from another writer who had remembered reading about symptoms similar to McCandless's occurring at a World War II concentration camp, Vapniarca. The prisoners of that camp were subjects of a cruel experiment, having been given food made from the "grasspea", a plant that humans have known for 2400 years to be toxic. It turns out to be an amino acid that makes the grasspea toxic, as well as the plant that McCandless ate. So when Krakauer searched for this kind of amino acid, he succeeded in finding what very likely killed McCandless.

I find it interesting that the "frontier of human knowledge" and the literal/physical "frontier of wilderness" can have such gaps between them. Generations of successively standing on shoulders have allowed humans to evolve our societal blueprints; we've increased our probability of survival living together vs. going it alone. But knowledge, even if recorded somewhere, is useless unless it is present at the moment that it has the greatest utility. Think about how we go about our daily routines. The various knowledge we must apply to our daily lives in order to "not die today", is pretty narrow. And should something life threatening confront us, living in a herd has its benefits. But leave society. Go off the grid. And here's a known toxin that exists in a plant. And it got eaten. So even if McCandless had all the up-to-date, current human knowledge at his fingertips while he was in the Denali Borough, would that have allowed him to survive alone in the wild?
An update to ‘Into the Wild’
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so...he needed an encyclopedia galactica? Not to be too snarky.

Solo resilience is a lot harder than a resilient community.
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Well +Jason Berk, the good news is you're not alone, which means there is a viable market for a solution. I would open my wallet for hardware that I would own, but not for anything with a monthly fee. In the meantime I guess we just "watch this space".
Keywords columnist Christopher Mims explains why your home Wi-Fi network is lousy and what might fix it.
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I try to hard wire what I can. My roku is hard wired but not the kids' laptops nor tablets.

I rarely plug my laptop in (although I do have a spare cable near the couch that I could/should use).

To further the digression, I think the NYT did an analysis and found that paywall was a bit of a pain. Which is why they have an N free views per month. It lets people see their content and if you are interested you can buy into the paywall.

Also, Meraki (bought by cisco) had some intriguing mesh networking stuff. I haven't kept up with it to see if Cisco actually did anything usual (for us residential scum) with it.
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The grown-ups involved contributed the sketchbooks and pencils.

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Hey Googlers...

FYI: At the end of the page where you apply for IO16 registration, the link to the terms and conditions is an empty page. I.e., this link:

https://events.google.com/io2016/registration/apply/#/terms-and-conditions

I kinda wanted to read it before clicking. :-)
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It has been fixed now. Woo-hoo! :-)
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Kids wouldn't touch it. Victory is mine!

fresh and tangy toppings (sun-dried tomato, yellow pepper, onion and fresh dill)
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Not sure about the dill, but worth a try. Needs some dead animal flesh on it though. ;-)
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Okay software folk, what is your approach when you encounter "poor code"?
Noam Ben-Ami's answer: Ah yes. I've done this at so many startups now. Ok. Take a deep breath. Relax. First of all, this is pretty standard at startups. There just aren't that many good engineers out there. Second, forget about refactoring for just a second. That is the easy path, the path to ...
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Lee Riemenschneider's profile photoMark Senn's profile photoBroc Seib's profile photoJoe Kline's profile photo
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Yeah, what +Kevin Colby wrote. Very much in line from the folks I know that do/write about "legacy remediation" :-)

Also, much cheaper to evolutionary rewrites than a "clean slate" approach. Lets you keep making money while upgrading.

That is of course until you hit those chunks that are "fuck, we gotta break the world to upgrade to the better stuff". Hopefully by then that "world" is smaller and more manageable.

Good article and discussion y'all. I like this stuff (but I'm a sysadmin so I'm regularly in the swamp trying to drain it while killing alligators and trying to remember it's not all alligator killing).
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Have him in circles
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Currently
Lafayette, IN
Previously
Williams, IN - Brisbane, Australia - Lafayette, IN
Story
Tagline
I'm passionate about creating software. It's what I love most.
Introduction

I am currently bootstrapping SendTree, a company that helps people send text messages to groups. Small businesses, churches, and organizations use SendTree's web based tools to compose, schedule, and deliver texts to their audiences. I've learned that the biggest challenge in starting a business is time.

Prior to SendTree, I spent 13 years creating software at Purdue University. While at Purdue's Rosen Center for Advanced Computing, I learned a fair bit about carbon emissions while writing software to support climate change research.

Prior to Purdue, I designed hardware and software for altimetry devices, and I programmed machines to manufacture small glass parts at Pynco, Inc. In 2008, I began serving on the Board at Pynco. This followed the untimely death of my father, Jim Seib, who founded Pynco in 1987.

I graduated from Purdue University in 1993 with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. I still enjoy creating a circuit once in a while.

Bragging rights
Home has always had prime number street addresses: 103 University; 2801 Kossuth; 47 Hindes; 619 Bur Oak
Work
Occupation
IT Entrepreneur
Skills
Software Engineering
Employment
  • SendTree
    Software Engineer, 2013 - present
  • Gentomi, Inc.
    Owner, 2008 - present
  • Purdue University
    Software Engineer
  • Pynco, Inc.
    Engineer
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Gender
Male
Eric and his team have been mowing and doing spring landscape cleanup for us for years now. He does a great job and works to keep his customers happy. I'm so glad to write a check and trust that these jobs will be done well and I can spend my time elsewhere.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
I had the taramosalata as an appetizer, and it was simply outstanding. I don't think it is on their menu. Don't miss trying this one. For dinner I ordered the Chef's plate, to sample many of their dishes. This plate has a *lot* of food, so plan to take some home. Everything was very good. I felt the standout on that plate was the Moussaka. The other standout was the side of green beans! They were fantastic. We didn't have room for dessert, but some of the coffee desserts sounded great. I noticed two other things on their menu: 1) a kids menu 2) a lot of gluten free choices. The staff were friendly, helpful, and on top of things. Just great all around. Can't wait to go again.
• • •
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
I had a prawn jalfrezi dish that had phenomenal flavors, including whole cardamom and cinnamon.
Public - 6 years ago
reviewed 6 years ago
4 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Hours of operation would be helpful on this page. I called the 800 number (on 7/27/2012) to ask, and this location is open until 8pm. Also, if you are shipping something, bring a government issued ID.
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago