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Brian White
Works at Google
Attended University of Waterloo
Lives in Montreal, QC, Canada
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Brian White

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Ahhh, Randall... Thank you for saying so clearly what needs to be said.
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Perfectly quotable alt text on this one!
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I'm trying to create custom MapType...  The ImageMapType just isn't quite what I need because I need to be able to modify the created img tag to set some CSS styles on it depending on the x/y/z.

I've create my own class but just implementing the MapType interface:

public class FooMap imlements MapType { ... }

doesn't seem to be enough because when I add it to the map-type registry with:

mapwidget.getMapTypeRegistry().set(FOO_ID, fooInstance)

I get the following exception:

@com.google.gwt.maps.client.maptypes.MapTypeRegistry::set(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/Object;)([string:'FooID', Java object: com.example.FooMap@1360213231])

com.google.gwt.core.client.JavaScriptException: (Error)@com.google.gwt.core.client.impl.Impl::apply(Ljava/lang/Object;Ljava/lang/Object;Ljava/lang/Object;)([JavaScript object(44), JavaScript object(32), JavaScript object(46)]): Expected value implementing google.maps.MapType

What am I missing?  Any examples I can look at?
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Not getting any help here, so asked on StackOverflow.  Didn't get any help there, either, but eventually worked it out myself.  Answer posted there. 
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/22799890/how-do-you-create-a-custom-maptype-with-branflake-gwt-maps-v3-api/22900506
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Kids and Money, part 3

My son, being 7 years old, gets $7/week (or $1/day) as an allowance. There are parts of the world where the majority of the people live on less than this amount.  The image attached to this post shows that.  (credit: Wikipedia)

How much should you put aside for charity? I set the bar at 10% with my kids. I read in Rockerfeller’s contract that he set the bar at 20% for his son. You can look at it as “investing” if you wish; you’re just investing in someone else’s future instead of your own. Or you could be like Warren Buffett who is notoriously thrifty despite being one of the richest men in the world but plans to leave the vast majority of his fortune to charity when he dies. He feels that the charities would rather have a lot more money tomorrow than some money today and, given his investing record, he’s probably correct.

Anyway… Today we dumped out my son’s “charity” piggy bank (which receives $1/week), counted it up, did various currency exchanges, and worked out that he had equivalent of about USD$55. We took $50 of it and transferred it to Kiva(.org) where he would be able to lend it out to people for causes he deemed worthwhile.

I chose Kiva for several reasons:

• It’s interactive: You get to choose exactly where your donations go. Also, small donations like $25 or $50 have a measurable impact.

• It’s personal: You get to see photos of and read profiles about the people requesting money. I can point directly at people and say, “That person makes less than you do and has to buy food, clothing, housing, and everything else with it.”

• It’s a loan: This means he’ll get the money repaid and can lend it out again. This allows him to act more frequently and doubles as an education about lending money.

So my son is now a philanthropist and we’ll periodically check in to watch the loans get repaid and get status reports on how each recipient is doing. He’s really got a pretty opulent life and maybe one day he’ll even realize that.
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Interesting but it's never been a problem for me.  In the 1000+ loans I've given out, I think only 1 or 2 haven't been repaid.
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Brian White

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Kids and Money

I thought I’d take a break from Photography for a few minutes to talk about money. Specifically, about kids and money.

A study done (sorry, I can’t find the reference) in the USA showed that wealthy families are far more likely than middle-class or low-income families to teach their children about managing money. If you want your kids to be financially stable, or even outright successful, then we as parents need to teach them from a young age.

How? Start by giving them an allowance; $1 per year of age per week is a good starting point and it needs to be divided into categories such as “spending”, “savings”, “investment”, and “charity”. For proportions, 10% for the latter two is a good number and then divide the remainder equally between the first two. Round it nicely. (e.g. $8 => $3, $3, $1, $1) spending=”anything”; savings=”important things”; investment=”for retirement”; charity=”given to those less fortunate”

When? A child should start learning about money as soon as they are able to understand that a dime, though smaller, is worth more than a nickel. Physical spending money should come as soon as they can make change. My personal experience says that 7 years old seems the right time. 6 was a bit young.

Why? Because. It’s our responsibility as a parents to teach our kids and that’s what we’re doing here. I don’t personally believe in paying an allowance in exchange for chores around the house — in our family, doing chores is how you contribute back to the family; the kids don’t get paid for their chores any more than I get payed for cooking or doing dishes.

Once the child has money of their own, they need to be taught how to spend it wisely. They can divert “spending” into any of the other three categories or “savings” into “investment” but there’s no going the other way. If they want something for themselves, let them buy it, even if you think it’s wrong. Explain what something costs in terms of what else they could have instead (the “opportunity cost”) but in the end, abide by their decisions. It’s their money and they need to be allowed to make mistakes.

Encourage them to buy their own gifts for others on Christmas or birthdays rather than ride on the gifts from parents. I contribute 1/2 the cost when they’re buying for others. (…though gifts made by hand are still better, in my opinion.)

Make them pay if they break or lose something that then has to be replaced, like a windbreaker or winter gloves. I pay 1/2 of that, too, simply because it’s not practical for a $8 allowance, of which only $3 is available for reimbursement, to pay the full replacement cost.

If they’re short, be willing to loan them some money but set a strict repayment schedule and charge interest. 0.5%/month (6%/year) is an easy amount. That’s how the real world works so they might as well get used to it.

<<Photo courtesy of Brittany Lynne Photography (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brittany-Lynne-Photography/262138523817254), part of the "365 Ways to Live Cheap Revisited" project (http://www.thesimpledollar.com/category/365-ways-to-live-cheap/).>>
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You need a fifth jar, that gets half of all the money, then gets thrown into the trash once a month - label it "taxes".
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Brian White

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I've been a bit lax about posting these, but here's the next one.  Drap by www.kiva.org and claim it for yourself!  Just comment that you have done so to prevent others from trying.

XNRE-NR9D-KRJQ-XX9Q
 
Teaching a man to fish...

When it comes to charity, I've always been a believer in donating to causes that help people help themselves.  One of my favorites is Kiva because it provides funds to the entrepreneurial sort of folk who, in my opinion, are some of the best for improving the general way of life of others as well as themselves.

Kiva is "microlending" where people like you and me loan money to others for whatever their reasons and then pay it back... at which point you can loan it out again!  It isn't technically "charity" because you get the money back (interest goes to the entities administering the loan) but it is providing a valuable service.

So, in the spirit of the holiday season, I'm going to be giving away free money to all of you to loan out to whomever you see fit.

So watch your streams...  I'll start soon!
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I could really use 800-1000 for my wifes BDay (she needs a computer) if anyones willing and in a charitable mood.
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Brian White

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My daughter just made her first two $25 charity loans via www.Kiva.org.  She's 6 years old.  Here's $25 for you to do the same.  Just comment if you use the voucher so others don't continue to try.  Merry Christmas!

AT33-H7FC-TRCJ-3XH3
 
Teaching a man to fish...

When it comes to charity, I've always been a believer in donating to causes that help people help themselves.  One of my favorites is Kiva because it provides funds to the entrepreneurial sort of folk who, in my opinion, are some of the best for improving the general way of life of others as well as themselves.

Kiva is "microlending" where people like you and me loan money to others for whatever their reasons and then pay it back... at which point you can loan it out again!  It isn't technically "charity" because you get the money back (interest goes to the entities administering the loan) but it is providing a valuable service.

So, in the spirit of the holiday season, I'm going to be giving away free money to all of you to loan out to whomever you see fit.

So watch your streams...  I'll start soon!
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Happy holidays!! ^^
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Brian White

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Kids and Money, part 4

I’ve never been poor. The reason for this is not due to an abundance of money but rather always having the safety net of my parents. I always knew that if I hit rock-bottom, I could pick up a phone, call collect if necessary, say “I need help”, and help would be there.

I have, however, spent some months of my life with absolutely zero money. Those investments I had made? I cashed them in to fund a business I wanted to start with some friends. After a year or so, we hadn’t finished our product but were scraping by with some consulting work. It payed the office rent but not any salaries.

Not only did I have no money in the bank, I had recently called Visa to ask for an increase in my limit… so I could take a cash advance to pay my rent. It was December in Canada and I was driving to work on tires so bald you could see the steel belts in places. My budget for Christmas was a whopping $25 of which $14 went to a box of cards. My most common gift was a bookmark and a note saying, “Sorry I can’t buy you a book.”

A couple memories stick out. I remember an ad on the radio for some fancy necklace that was only “one ninety-nine”; I figured if it were $1.99 then I might be able to afford it. I also remember getting a $50 parking ticket while I was buying those bookmarks. I wasn’t going to be able to pay it for months.

But despite all this, I kept on with the plan because we were in the process of having the company bought to add our in-the-works product to the line-up of another company and we had to hold on just a few more months and there would be a reasonable pay-out. Not enough to make anyone rich, or probably even make up for the year’s salary we had done without, but enough to make us as individuals solvent again. Plus we’d get back to working on what we wanted.

This time of my life was an invaluable lesson. Money is a source of huge concern but also of huge pride to those who do not have it. Though I borrowed money that I would eventually pay back with interest, I wouldn’t accept a dime in the form of a gift (though I did, reluctantly, accept new tires from my parents as a Christmas present).

Really, having nothing is an experience everyone should have. It teaches you things that you can learn no other way. It makes you appreciate when you do have things. One of the problems I see with teaching my kids how to save & invest from a young age is that they may never gain this experience and I don’t know what could possibly serve as a substitute.

But even with this experience, I can only guess what it’s like to be poor.

(photo courtesy Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Poor_mother_and_children,_Oklahoma,_1936_by_Dorothea_Lange.jpg)
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Wow
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Kids and Money, part 2

I believe it’s a good thing to teach kids about investing from a young age. While I don’t expect a young child to grasp all the nuances of return-on-investment, present-value calculations, and price-earnings ratios, I do think they can start to pick up the basics ideas of investing and that the value of things bought can go up over the long term.

Investing for the future can be difficult which is why it’s so important for it to become a habit from the very beginning. If you take 10% of your gross income and invest it wisely (an S&P500 “index fund” outperforms most mutual funds largely because it has no “overhead” costs) then you should be able to retire and continue the same lifestyle you had at retirement. The earlier you start this, the earlier you can retire.

My parents told me this 10% rule but it was always in the context of when I got a real job after finishing university. Better would be from the first time I had any income at all — i.e. an allowance.

Also essential is that this 10% be moved from paycheck to investment account automatically. If you never see it, you’ll never miss it. If you look to invest from what is left over at the end of the month, then you’ll never have anything to invest. In doling out my son’s allowance, I divide it for him and tell him how much is going into each piggy bank (he has three of them) but the portion for investment I just mention and say I’ll hold it for him.

In the spirit of investing in what you know, I told my 7-year old son to talk to all his friends at school and find out what they were asking for as gifts at Christmas. There were a number of different items but Beyblades seemed a favorite so we found out the company that sells them (Hasbro) and bought one share in that company for $34.24. It’s in my name, of course, and I payed the brokerage fee but I’ve set it up a portfolio under Google Finance in his name so he can watch it. The first time we checked he’d lost 6 cents but now it’s up quite considerably. Losing a little at the front gave me reason to reinforce that investments are made for years, not months or days.

Incidentally, I don’t expect my kids to remember what I tell them. I expect to have to tell them many times in many different ways over many years before they fully understand. Typically though, I’m surprised at how much they pick up and right away. I’m also surprised by how much I learn while teaching.

<<Photo courtesy of radioflyer007 via Flickr Creative Commons>>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/radioflyer007/394384475/in/photostream/
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Brian White

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Helps soften the hate of politics just a little. Wish my mayor was humorous. 
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Brian White

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Anyone want to give money to someone else?  My kids (9 and 6) use this to help people around the world and now you can too.

WJMW-JEJN-3AFX-KNKE

Go to http://www.Kiva.org/ to use it.  Comment that you've taken it if you do so others don't continue to try.
 
Teaching a man to fish...

When it comes to charity, I've always been a believer in donating to causes that help people help themselves.  One of my favorites is Kiva because it provides funds to the entrepreneurial sort of folk who, in my opinion, are some of the best for improving the general way of life of others as well as themselves.

Kiva is "microlending" where people like you and me loan money to others for whatever their reasons and then pay it back... at which point you can loan it out again!  It isn't technically "charity" because you get the money back (interest goes to the entities administering the loan) but it is providing a valuable service.

So, in the spirit of the holiday season, I'm going to be giving away free money to all of you to loan out to whomever you see fit.

So watch your streams...  I'll start soon!
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Aiah Marrah's profile photoPatrick Lalande's profile photoRandy Resnick's profile photo
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Why wouldn't you try to help people individually? as you said you help people who help themselves. Keep on the faith as a family my suggestion is  help someone who you can point at Generally it's good to be a philanthropist. There are so many people who need help in my country SL. I am coming from a land that produces lot of diamonds in SL Kono to be honest  lot of them  are  pro poor indeed. These people need education to fight for their rights.
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People
In his circles
1,776 people
Have him in circles
18,860 people
April Joy Gutel's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Computer Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, Chrome, 2012 - present
  • Google
    Site-Reliability Engineer for Orkut, Open-Social, News, and finally Websearch itself, 2007 - 2012
  • Precidia Technologies
    Chief Software Designer, 1999 - 2006
  • Wann Connection Devices
    1998 - 1999
  • Verisim
    (not the current Verisim.com), 1995 - 1998
  • Nortel Networks
    1994 - 1995
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Montreal, QC, Canada
Previously
Zurich, Switzerland - Ottawa, ON, Canada - Waterloo, ON, Canada - Redmond, WA, USA - Esterhazy, SK, Canada - Elkford, BC, Canada - Kimberley, BC, Canada - Milton-Freewater, OR, USA - Portland, OR, USA
Story
Tagline
World Traveler, Amateur Photographer, Professional Googler
Introduction
This particular Brian currently works for Google in Montreal, Canada (though he just finished a 5-year stint in Zurich, Switzerland -- one of the nicest places to live in the world).  The jury is still out on Montreal.  Being a "small town boy", it is yet to be determined if he likes living in the big city.
Bragging rights
I have a natural gift for recognizing the next "big" technology product: I look at it and think, "Who in their right mind would want that?!?"
Education
  • University of Waterloo
    Electrical & Computer Engineering, 1988 - 1994
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
bcwhite, Dragonslayer (Ingress Enlightened)
Decent food. Fast service.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
I've visited Dr. Delorme for over a year as a personal experiment to see how regular chiropractic adjustments would help me even without major ailments to correct. Afterwards I've always felt great and he even helped some aching knees that I didn't expect to be treatable that way. His bedside manner is always of a good nature and he will cheerfully answer any questions I have. I have no compunctions recommending him to others.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
Fast, with large portions. Had a very tasty beef chimichanga with quite the "bite".
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Very tasty food at good prices. Service is friendly but slow when busy.
Quality: Very goodAppeal: Very goodService: Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
22 reviews
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Went on a date with my daughter. Spaghetti and massage were good but nothing exceptional. More expensive dishes might be better quality.
Food: GoodDecor: Very goodService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Just into a tiny side street off of a back street, this establishment has some of the best burgers in Amsterdam. Cooked fresh right in front of you with whatever toppings you like, everything is very tasty and the fries are excellent. Nothing fancy or pretentious; just pure-beef burgers (or portobello for herbivores).
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Nice apartments; good pool; decent beach nearby. Semi-friendly staff; free WiFi but intermittent Internet and have to re-login every hour or two; so-so neighborhood. Apartment missing salt, pepper, dish soap, etc. (even a started pack).
Quality: GoodFacilities: Very goodService: Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago