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Brian Slesinsky
Works at Google
Lives in Hayward, CA
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Brian Slesinsky

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Practical steps to accommodate more wind and solar — no tech breakthroughs required.
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From the article: "The data revealed that, before developing perceptual constancy, 3- to 4-month-old babies have a “striking ability” to discriminate image differences due to changes in illumination that are not salient for adults. They lose this superior skill around the age of 5 months. Then, at 7-8 months of age, they develop the ability to discriminate surface properties such as glossy vs matte (which they maintain until adulthood) [...]"
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Given a parser and an input file, this tool automatically figures out the syntax. I wonder if it would be useful for syntax highlighting? :)
The nice thing about the instrumentation used by American Fuzzy Lop is that it allows us to do much more than just, well, fuzzing stuff. For example, for a while now, the fuzzer shipped with a standalone tool called afl-tmin, which allows you to take an interesting file and automatically shrink ...
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What's the main technical challenge of solar energy? Depends on who you are, of course; if you're a utility company it's the duck curve.
The rise of rooftop solar panels has the grid quacking. (Quacking! Get it?!)
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From the article: "Rabbits are social animals — creatures of the warren, snugglers in bunny piles. They don’t like to live alone. But rabbits in close quarters will not automatically bond. If they can’t work out which is dominant, said Ms. Odum, 'they can fight like tigers.'"
After adopting a male rabbit named Moo, a couple decided he needed a friend.
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Operating system research meets economics. From the article:

"Blocking in a classical system acts as a natural throttle on the amount of work that can be offered up to the system. Your average program doesn’t express all of its latent concurrency and parallelism by default. But ours did! Although that sounds like a good thing – and indeed it was – it came with a dark side. How the heck do you manage resources and schedule all that work intelligently, in the face of so much of it?"

[...]

"Perhaps surprisingly, our most promising results came from adapting advertisement bidding algorithms to resource allocation. Coupled with an element of game theory, this approach gets very interesting. If the system charges a market value for all system resources, and all agents in the system have a finite amount of 'purchasing power,' we can expect they will purchase those resources that benefit themselves the most based on the market prices available."
Joe Duffy's Blog | Adventures in the high-tech underbelly
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From the article: "50 percent of sleep-deprived participants signed the false confession, while only 18 percent of rested participants signed it."
Sleep-deprived people are much more likely to sign false confessions than rested individuals, according to an MSU-led study that has important implications for police interrogation practices.
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Brian Slesinsky

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From the article: "That image is very fuzzy - with a resolution of about 21 degrees, compared to the 0.02-degree precision of our eyes - but it is enough for photoreceptor molecules, embedded in the cell membrane, to guide the bug's movement."
Biologists discover how bacteria sense light and move towards it: the entire single-cell organism focuses light like a tiny eyeball.
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From the article: "Racist South Africa, run by its National Party, produced 150,000 barrels of gasoline per day, twice the level of synthetic fuel production achieved in Nazi Germany. Yet coal hydrogenation never produced gasoline that could compete in world markets; its price was always above that of gasoline made from crude oil, and its expense precluded its use except as a tool of autarkic governments. Nevertheless it deserves a place in histories of the 20th century because without it Nazi Germany and South Africa could hardly have held on to their power as long as they did."
Chemistry rarely figures in histories of 20th-century science and technology. Putting it back into the standard history would force us to change many of the historical arguments that shape our account of an extraordinary century.
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There's a long, fascinating chapter in The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power that details how WWII was won and lost on being able to get gasoline, including the coal gasification efforts. But this bit surprised me:

"The V-2 was without question a major setback to the German war economy: its production killed more people in the manufacturing plant than its deployment as a weapon killed in the field."
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From the article: "[M]ammoth tusks is having a serious effect on the market for living elephant tusks. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, they write, tusks from dead mammoths, found in the frozen Siberian tundra, have risen to account for as much as 20 percent of all ivory production."
A wave of new research points to a disturbing cause for the woolly mammoth's extinction. Can we prevent ourselves from repeating the same mistake?
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From the article:

"In 1975, a psychologist in New York was studying taste aversion in a group of rats and got an utterly mystifying result.

"Robert Ader, working at the University of Rochester, gave his animals saccharin solution to drink. Rats usually love the sweet taste but for this experiment, Ader paired the drink with injections of Cytoxan, which made them feel sick. When he later gave the animals the sweetened water on its own they refused to drink it, just as he expected. So to find out how long the learned aversion would last, he force-fed this harmless drink to them using an eyedropper. But the rats didn’t forget. Instead, one by one, they died.

"Though Cytoxan is toxic, Ader’s rats hadn’t received anything close to a fatal dose. Instead, after a series of other experiments, Ader concluded that when the animals received saccharin and the drug together, they hadn’t just associated the sweet taste with feeling sick, they’d also learned the immunosuppression. Eventually, they’d responded to the sweetened water just as they had to the drug. Even though the second phase of the experiment involved no drug at all, the doses of water Ader fed them suppressed their immune systems so dramatically that they succumbed to fatal infections."
Jo Marchant asks if we can harness the mind to reduce side-effects and slash drug costs.
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Hayward, CA
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Binghamton, NY
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    Software Engineer, 2006 - present
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The oil change itself seemed okay, but it seemed understaffed (two people), and they were fairly unhelpful. Nobody talked to the customers when they arrived. Waited a long time to pay after the oil change was done, while they both worked on another car. The maintenance light wasn't reset so I went back, and after waiting for a while I ended up looking up in the manual how to reset it myself.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
We eat here often. The garlic noodles are very tasty.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
They moved to Mountain View at 2500 El Camino Real, on the corner opposite Whole Foods and Target. Other than that, smooth transaction; they took a carload of old electronics and didn't seem too picky.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
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Smooth transaction; rented a cargo van Saturday afternoon, returned that night (after hours). Actual cost: $30 + $42 mileage + $35 fuel + $7 taxes = $114 for 53 miles.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago