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Brian Slesinsky
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Harmless Science Experiment
Harmless Science Experiment

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From the web page: "Patients and their families and caregivers can donate unexpired prescribed medications. Donated medications are returned to SafeNetRx where all medications are inspected by pharmacists and then dispensed at no cost to Iowans who need but cannot afford treatment medications."

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"[T]he Curtis Bay Medical Waste facility on the south side of Baltimore [is] home of the largest incinerator of its kind in the country.

"Here Curtis Bay’s fleet of trucks delivers load after load of unused, unexpired drugs from hundreds of nursing homes and other facilities and clinics up and down the East Coast. Drugs also come from medical waste companies like SteriCycle and Daniels Sharpsmart. In 2015, 204 tons of non-hazardous pharmaceutical waste came from the Daniels location in the Bronx, according to records filed in New York. Such waste includes not only drugs tossed by nursing homes, but also those from hospitals, doctors’ offices and other facilities."

[...]

"Nursing homes save the disposal fees in Iowa, because they can donate them to SafeNetRx, where they benefit needy patients [...]"

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From the article:

"[...] Qatar’s foes have been careful to leave energy markets out of the blockade. The reliability of the Gulf as an energy trading partner is too valuable for all concerned."

"[...] Qatar exports gas and oil, imports everything else, and has a developed service sector. Unless its rivals were physically to block its ports, there is not much they can do."

"[...] the $A9.5 billion Hamad Port in northern Qatar [...] became operational last December. Until the blockade, many of Qatar’s imports came through Dubai’s Jebel Ali port and then by land to Qatar. Now, Qatar can import directly."


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From the article: "In the Mountain West—'God’s country, renter’s hell,' as one alt-weekly tagged it—where towns are already chronically beset by housing shortages, traffic problems, and the invariable ambivalence about sharing one’s slice of heaven with the tourists who help sustain it, the entrance of Airbnbs and VRBOs and HomeAways has heightened the tension. Some places, including Boulder and Denver, have passed tough regulations that permit only primary residents to rent out their properties for short periods. Other towns have taken the opposite tack, changing laws to allow previously illegal renting that was already on the rise, as happened late last year in Missoula, Montana."

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Weirder than you'd expect.

This is sooo not what it looks like. Just click, and be, perhaps, reminded of what the web was like in 1998.

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From the article: "[SureFly] is supposed to have its maiden flight later this year, most likely at the company’s truck factory, in Indiana.

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"The goal, Burns says, is to demonstrate to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that the air taxi is statistically twice as safe as taking a car to the same destination. One way to make it happen is with SureFly’s computer flight system, similar to many of the electronic safety features in today’s more advanced cars. Such a system would assist the pilot [...] so you’d still need a license to fly it."


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From the article: "Each airgun produces up to 180 decibels of noise, making them around 1,000 times louder than nearby fireworks. And each will go off five or six times a minute, for months at a time, from the back of slow-moving ships that crisscross 90,000 kilometres of Atlantic waters from New Jersey to Florida. There is clear evidence that noise of this magnitude kills or perturbs marine life at every scale—from titanic whales to tiny plankton. It 'poses an unacceptable risk of serious harm to marine life… the full extent of which will not be understood until long after the harm occurs,' said a group of 75 marine scientists in 2015.

"[Many businesses] oppose seismic testing [...] because the blasts can harm and displace fish, greatly reducing the populations that both commercial and recreational fishers depend upon. In other parts of the world, catch rates for species like cod and rockfish have fallen by 50 to 70 percent in the days after seismic tests. The tourism industry can also be affected, since airgun noise can potentially force whales to beach themselves."

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From the article: "This seeming evidence of the irrationality of judges [due to meals] has been cited hundreds of times, in economics, psychology and legal scholarship. [In 2016], a new analysis by Andreas Glöckner in the journal Judgement and Decision Making [questioned] these conclusions.

"The main analysis works like this: we know that favourable rulings take longer than unfavourable ones (~7 mins vs ~5 mins), and we assume that judges are able to guess how long a case will take to rule on before they begin it (from clues like the thickness of the file, the types of request made, the representation the prisoner has and so on). Finally, we assume judges have a time limit in mind for each of the three sessions of the day, and will avoid starting cases which they estimate will overrun the time limit for the current session.

"It turns out that this kind of rational time-management is sufficient to generate the drops in favourable outcomes."


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From the article: "The response was so effective that even though this was the first Ebola outbreak where a potential vaccine was available, it wasn’t necessary. Around 300,000 doses had been stockpiled. None were used. 'This is a candidate vaccine, which still has some steps before it is fully licensed,' says Fall. 'The WHO expert committee recommended to use it in the event of an outbreak, on health workers and [people who had been in contact with cases.] But because the outbreak was rapidly controlled, we didn’t need to use it.'"
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