Profile

Cover photo
Brian Slesinsky
Works at Google
Lives in Hayward, CA
1,464 followers|873,482 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTubeReviews

Stream

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Prion-Like Proteins Maintain Long-Term Memories

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/CPEB3-prions-long-term-memory-2187/.

Research from Eric Kandel’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time. And paradoxically, it works in the same way as mechanisms that cause mad cow disease, kuru, and other degenerative brain diseases.

The research is in Neuron and Cell Reports. (full access paywall and full open access)

Research: "The Persistence of Hippocampal-based Memory Requires Protein Synthesis Mediated by the Prion-like Protein CPEB3" by Eric Kandel, Luana Fioriti, Cory Myers, Yan-You Huang, Xiang Li, Joseph Stephan, Pierre Trifilieff, Stelios Kosmidis, Bettina Drisaldi, and Elias Pavlopoulos in Neuron doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.021 

Image: Memories are stored for the long-term with the help of prion-like proteins called CPEB. CPEB prions aggregate and maintain synapses that recorded the memory ["spines" in the bottom image]. When CPEB prions are not present or are inactivated, the synapses collapse and the memory fades [see upper image].  Image credit:  Lab of David Sulzer, PhD, Columbia University Medical Center.

#neuroscience   #memory  
1 comment on original post
3
1
Mariano Ortega's profile photo
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
3
1
Mark Bridge's profile photo
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
From the article: "the Harvey's bomb was the largest domestic bomb ever to explode in the United States until the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. And yet the story of the Harvey’s extortion bombing has since fallen into relative obscurity. When asked why so few people these days seem to remember the events that unfolded in Lake Tahoe on 26-27 August 1980, Jonkey’s speculation is succinct: 'Nobody died.'"
3
Lex Spoon's profile photo
 
Great read! I love the extra stick or two of dynamite tossed into the top chamber. It's the mad bomber's equivalent of defensive programming!
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Now you can generate your own dreamy neural net image

#deepdream  

For those of you who liked the post I shared a couple of weeks ago about the images generated by neural nets (old post: https://plus.google.com/+JeffDean/posts/jVBUgDxhbRd), I'm happy to announce that Alexander Mordvintsev, +Christopher Olah , and Mike Tyka have put together an open-source iPython notebook containing the code that generates these images, and you can play around with it on your own images.  (Note: this notebook depends on a few other packages, so you have to have enough persistence to install numpy and caffe to get this to work).  The iPython notebook is at https://github.com/google/deepdream, but see the blog post linked to by this post for details.

The blog post asks that people tag images they generate and share with #deepdream , so I suspect you can keep looking at that tag to see all kinds of weird and wonderful images.

Have fun, everyone!
9 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
In 1977, British palaeontologist Simon Conway-Morris discovered the fossil of a truly weird animal, which he named Hallucigenia because of its “bizarre and dream-like quality”. He wasn’t kidding. T...
4
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Researchers have for the first time sequenced and assembled de novo the full genome of a living organism, the bacteria Escherichia Coli, using Oxford Nanopore’s MinIONTM device, a genome sequencer that can fit in the palm of your hand.
3
1
David Mankin's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,464 people
Rocco De Angelis's profile photo
Kristien Vermoesen's profile photo
Kirsten Menger-Anderson's profile photo
LAURA VALDES's profile photo
Jonathan Smith's profile photo
Rasel Textile's profile photo
Maya Stab's profile photo
Hriday Sikder's profile photo
Olivier Turpin's profile photo

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
A fantastic invention: Jie Bao (of Tsinghua University) and Moungi Bawendi (of MIT) have invented an optical spectrometer small and cheap enough to attach to a cell phone, which can nonetheless perform comparably well to serious professional equipment.

Spectrometers are amazingly useful devices: they simply break light up through a prism, and report on how bright the light is in each frequency. That lets you recognize chemicals (each molecule has a distinctive color "fingerprint"), measure temperature (when you heat an object, it glows with a spectrum that's a simple function of temperature), and even measure the speed of objects. (If you know something's color when it's still, its colors in motion are shifted by the Doppler effect, just like an approaching siren's pitch goes up and a receding one goes down. The fingerprints of chemical colors give you an excellent reference point for that)

Bao and Bawendi's device is completely different from traditional spectrometers: Rather than using a prism and precision optics, they use an array of 195 carefully chosen inks and a CCD light sensor. The result is rugged and cheap – a few dollars, instead of a few hundred or thousand.

This is a tool that could revolutionize all sorts of devices; the authors give an example of a tool that could identify skin cancer just by pointing at it. (Cancers contain specific chemicals which produce specific optical fingerprints, after all!)

And more to the point, it's neat.

Dear Drs. Bao and Bawendi: TAKE MY MONEY!

Via +California Academy of Sciences.
A spectrometer that fits in your mobile devices could let you scan yourself for skin cancer.
40 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Neat little puzzle.
A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America, and why no one likes to be wrong.
6
1
Bhaskar Janakiraman's profile photoBrian Swetland's profile photoDaniel Egnor's profile photoTimothy Lau's profile photo
4 comments
 
Unfortunately, the original paper (where you might expect to see such evidence) is behind a paywall.
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
From the article: "Like other animals, the pitohui had discovered that becoming poisonous deters predators and parasites and that diet can be a great source of poison. These sources vary: Spoor-winged grouse eat beetles for their toxic cantharidin, while North American ruffed grouse and Australian bronzewings get their toxins from plants. But the European quail gets its neurotoxic poison, coniine, from hemlock seeds—which the quails have presumably evolved to resist, unlike humans."
Here’s a forensic riddle: Ten people eat an autumn dinner of roasted quail in Turkey. Hours later, four diners start to vomit. They grow weak. Their muscles ache. At the emergency department, they’re diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis—a life-threatening syndrome that afflicted people who survived being crushed under rubble during the London...
3
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
From the article: "Any healthcare provider may have a positive effect on doctor–patient interaction by sitting as opposed to standing during a hospital follow-up visit."
Screen reader users, click here to load entire articleThis page uses JavaScript to progressively load the article content as a user scrolls. Screen reader users, click the load entire article button to bypass dynamically loaded article content. ScienceDirect is phasing out support for older ...
2
Brian Slesinsky's profile photo
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
American innovation's success was built on its ability to transform great ideas though revolutionary manufacturing processes. The founder of A123 batteries has re-emerged with exciting news:

When it starts commercial sales in about two years, Chiang says, his company will slash the cost of an entry-level battery plant 10-fold, as well as cut around 30% off the price of the batteries themselves. That’s thanks to a new manufacturing process along with a powerful new cell that adds energy while stripping away cost. Together, he says, they will allow lithium-ion batteries to begin to compete with fossil fuels.

Could be the Bessemer process for batteries.
An invention that could cut the cost of battery plants 10-fold, and of batteries themselves by a third.
2 comments on original post
4
Mahlen Morris's profile photo
 
Very interesting. The hope that this will revitalize American manufacturing employment is misplaced, of course, these are highly automated systems. But a great thing to be working on.
Add a comment...

Brian Slesinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
From the article: "Barzilai and other researchers plan to test that notion in a clinical trial called Targeting Aging with Metformin, or TAME. They will give the drug metformin to thousands of people who already have one or two of three conditions — cancer, heart disease or cognitive impairment — or are at risk of them. People with type 2 diabetes cannot be enrolled because metformin is already used to treat that disease. The participants will then be monitored to see whether the medication forestalls the illnesses they do not already have, as well as diabetes and death."
Regulators asked to consider ageing a treatable condition.
1
Add a comment...
Brian's Collections
People
Have him in circles
1,464 people
Rocco De Angelis's profile photo
Kristien Vermoesen's profile photo
Kirsten Menger-Anderson's profile photo
LAURA VALDES's profile photo
Jonathan Smith's profile photo
Rasel Textile's profile photo
Maya Stab's profile photo
Hriday Sikder's profile photo
Olivier Turpin's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Hayward, CA
Previously
Binghamton, NY
Links
Story
Tagline
Harmless Science Experiment
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2006 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
We eat here often. The garlic noodles are very tasty.
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
Smooth transaction; rented a cargo van Saturday afternoon, returned that night (after hours). Actual cost: $30 + $42 mileage + $35 fuel + $7 taxes = $114 for 53 miles.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
3 reviews
Map
Map
Map
They moved to Mountain View at 2500 El Camino Real, on the corner opposite Whole Foods and Target. Other than that, smooth transaction; they took a carload of old electronics and didn't seem too picky.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago