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Brian Slesinsky
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Harmless Science Experiment
Harmless Science Experiment

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From the article: "In a series of results reported in the journals Physical Review Letters and Chaos, scientists have used machine learning — the same computational technique behind recent successes in artificial intelligence — to predict the future evolution of chaotic systems out to stunningly distant horizons. The approach is being lauded by outside experts as groundbreaking and likely to find wide application."
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From the article: "As the potential hazards of the fault have become clearer in recent years, officials have begun to take action. Old city halls in Hayward and Fremont have been abandoned because they lie on the fault. At Memorial Stadium at UC Berkeley, seating was recently broken up and rebuilt so that the facility’s western half could move 6 feet northwest from the other side. In the hypothetical earthquake scenario, half of Memorial Stadium moves 2 feet northwest during the main earthquake, another foot over the next 24 hours, and yet another foot or so over the next few weeks or months, Hudnut said."
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From the article: "Google App Engine is discontinuing a practice called domain-fronting, which let services use Google’s network to get around state-level internet blocks."

[...]

"'Domain fronting has never been a supported feature at Google,' a company representative said, 'but until recently it worked because of a quirk of our software stack.'"
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From the article: "As producers like Rio hunt for new buyers for their bauxite and sources of alumina to feed smelters, the global chokepoint created by the sanctions means that many of the miners, refiners and smelters that should be benefiting from surging prices are actually facing challenges just to keep their operations running. For aluminum smelters, suspending operations is a worst-case scenario and restarting is very expensive."
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Neat! I've always thought someone should build this. But will Etherium mining still be a thing by the time it ships? (Let alone pays for itself.)

From the article: "According to Qarnot, the QC-1 has two Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX 580 graphics cards that can mine at up to 60MH/s, which TechCrunchnotes should be enough to make around $120 per month (€100) based on the current price of Ethereum. (That number doesn’t take into account the power usage from the QC-1, which the company hasn’t commented on.)"
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A quote from a Wall Street Journal article, via Matt Levine:

"West Virginia attorney John Barrett really wants his clients to know he won a $61 million verdict against Dish Network Corp. on their behalf after a company contractor badgered people with marketing phone calls.

"There is just one hitch: His clients keep hanging up when he calls to convey the good news.

"One woman said “that’s ridiculous” and hurried off the phone when told that every unwanted Dish call is now worth $1,200."

To which he responds:

"From first principles you might imagine that what these people -- who have never heard of Barrett's lawsuit, but who are on the do-not-call list -- want is not $1,200 but to stop getting annoying phone calls. But in the U.S. legal system, just fixing the problem is not on offer. Giving them money, and giving the lawyers a cut, and making the problem worse, is the standard approach."
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From the article: "Right now the code says a structure must be engineered to have a 90 percent chance of avoiding total collapse. But many experts believe that is not enough.

"'Ten percent of buildings will collapse,' said Lucy Jones, the former leader of natural hazards research at the United States Geological Survey who is leading a campaign to make building codes in California stronger. 'I don’t understand why that’s acceptable.'

"The code also does not specify that a building be fit for occupancy after an earthquake. Many buildings might not collapse completely, but they could be damaged beyond repair. The interior walls, the plumbing, elevators — all could be wrecked or damaged."

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From the article: "Backed by Russia’s federal security service (FSB) and a court decision, Roskomnadzor has pushed forward, banning subnets, totalling millions of IP addresses, used by Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud, two hosting sites that Telegram switched to over the weekend to help circumvent the ban."
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Although it's a niche, apparently successors to the OLPC still being built and used in some places. From the article:

"[T]he new OLPC is focused on getting laptops to non-governmental organizations and updating hardware only when absolutely necessary. It’s currently designing a successor to the XO-4, with a bigger screen and more powerful components — apparently because manufacturers complained that the old parts were getting hard to find."

[...]

"To kids who grew up around smartphones and tablets, says Karmacharya, OLPC’s XO design looks hopelessly outdated. 'If their parents happen to have even a low-cost smartphone, they’re more interested in that than the laptop.' But the device is tougher than a cheap Android tablet, and its unique design makes it harder to steal. Users can rely on Sugar’s development community to maintain the software. And unlike a phone or tablet, it’s custom-built for making things, not consuming them. 'We’re constantly looking out for any sort of alternative,' he says. 'And to date, we have not found anything that compares.'"



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From the article: "The team found that rare earths are concentrated in biogenic calcium phosphate grains in seabed sludge.

"It said it has developed a method to recover calcium phosphate from the mud by making the concentration of rare earth metals 2.6 times higher using centrifugal technology.

"Tests done in a laboratory on land showed that the method could drastically slash mining costs by reducing the volume of mud raised from the seabed, team members said."

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