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Brian Slesinsky
Works at Google
Lives in Hayward, CA
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Brian Slesinsky

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From the article: "Just as each of our cells has a circadian cycle, tumor growth is rhythmic. Some lymphomas see a peak in cell division late in the evening, whereas gut lining divides 23 times as much in the early morning as it does at night. In this case, chemotherapy in the evening targets the tumor while doing away with excruciating effects on healthy tissue."
In light of circadian research, prescriptions like “Take Once Daily” are terrifyingly vague.
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Brian Slesinsky

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It’s now been 103 days since workers from the Southern California Gas Company discovered a natural gas leak coming from the Aliso Canyon underground storage field near the Porter Ranch neighborhood…
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From the article: "[A homeowner] can store power when it's cheap and use it (or sell it to the utility) when it's expensive, pocketing the difference.

"Importantly, this does not work under net metering, the policy that's in place in most states today. Under typical net metering, the utility is obliged to buy her surplus power at retail rates. That's as much as she'll ever be able to get for it, so there's no incentive to store it for later."

It's coming, there's no stopping it, and utilities are going to get crushed if they don't reform.
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First: 3-to-1 is if you make a kwh during peak and consume that same credit, so yes, it is the same price to buy and sell. However, it is just a credit and goes away - you do not get that credit in cash at the end of the solar year.
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A realistic neural network simulation? The actual paper seems to be paywalled, but this looks interesting. From the article:

 "We show how a model circuit of biologically realistic spiking neurons can solve this computationally challenging problem in a novel way. The synaptic weights of our network can be learned using local plasticity rules such that its dynamics devise a near-optimal plan of action. By systematically comparing our model results to experimental data, we show that it reproduces behavioral decision times and choice probabilities as well as neural responses in a rich set of tasks. Our results thus offer the first biologically realistic account for complex goal-directed decision making at a computational, algorithmic, and implementational level."
Researchers have built the first biologically realistic mathematical model of how the brain plans and learns when faced with a complex decision-making process.Researchers have constructed the firs
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not even an open access preprint?!? ok won't read it then, I'm sure a lot of people will do the same
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Brian Slesinsky

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From the article:

"If you use Safari, you’re using the Mac or iOS port. These ports get frequent security updates from Apple to plug vulnerabilities, which users receive via regular updates.

"Everything else is broken."
Linux distributions have a problem with WebKit security. Major desktop browsers push automatic security updates directly to users on a regular basis, so most users don't have to worry about security updates. But Linux users are dependent on their distributions to release updates.
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Brian Slesinsky

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Quotes from the article:

"Myanmar is a country of farmers. Fifty three million citizens, approximately thirty million of whom are farmers. Many of them are now coming online. Rushing online, really. Because of the military junta, mobile SIM cards in Myanmar have historically been prohibitively expensive. In 2014, the cost of a SIM card dropped from about $2,000 USD to $200 USD and then once again, to $1.50 USD. Mobile shops were swarmed."

[...]

"No credit cards. No email addresses. [...] Everyone installs apps using Zapya, an app-sharing app. Makes a local network. Everyone nearby connects to it. Allows groups to send data—apps, videos, music—back and forth without using bandwidth. I take note: All apps hand copies of other apps. No official distribution channels in use."

[...]

"But Facebook is most popular? Yes. Everyone wants? Everyone. Do people have email addresses? No. He makes the email addresses. Has a stack of pre-made Facebook accounts at the ready. He pre-installs the app and pre-loads friends. Facebook is for news, he says. Popular now but maybe not popular in six months. But for now, he installs it on every phone."

[..]

"The Farmers don’t use their real names (“I used my son’s name,” Farmer fourteen told us. Why? “Because it’s a good name!” he said smiling and patting his 1-year-old son on the head.) They don’t have email addresses and so often don’t know their logins. If they get logged out they have someone—often the village Facebook guru—make them a new account."
A dispatch from an Internet revolution in progress.
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Brian Slesinsky

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From the article: "The kicks are also exceptionally fast, with each foot touching its target for just 15 milliseconds. That’s too quick for the bird to adjust its movements using sensory feedback from its limbs; it just has to aim with its eyes and go for it."
"The bird's hunting technique is simple: Find prey, flush it out, and stamp the living crap out of it."
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Brian Slesinsky

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From the article: "Computer systems have traditionally made it extraordinarily difficult to see the precise value of a floating-point number."
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From the article: "The most dangerous place on a road is at traffic lights. Almost half the accidents in most cities occur at lights. This is due not just to war between “amber gamblers” and reckless cyclists. A crossing is where everyone should be watching everyone else, but everyone is watching the lights. They are awaiting orders. When given them, they assume all is safe and crash on."
It’s clear there are fewer accidents when drivers are trusted not to kill themselves, and each other. Assuming we need constant protection is the mark of a controlling state.
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From the article: "Flowering plants, which butterflies drink from, hadn’t colonised the land during the kalligrammatid era, so these early insects probably fed from ancient plants like conifers and cycads (which are still around) and bennettitaleans (which are not)."
There’s a group of fossils insects that look really quite a lot like butterflies. They had broad wings with scales and pigmented eyespots. Their mouthparts were long probing straws. They likely fed…
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Brian Slesinsky

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You Can Teach an Old Dog New Tricks, But Younger Dogs Learn Faster

Aging affects the cognitive abilities of dogs, as a recent study by the Clever Dog Lab of the Messerli Research Institute at the Vetmeduni Vienna shows. A team of behavioural scientists studied dogs of different ages working on a specially designed touchscreen computer and discovered that although all dogs were capable of learning, older dogs learnt more slowly than younger ones. No age-related differences were found regarding long-term memory.

The research is in Age. (full open access)

#learning #aging #animals
Aging affects the cognitive abilities of dogs, as a recent study by the Clever Dog Lab of the Messerli Research Institute at the Vetmeduni Vienna shows. A team of behavioural scientists studied dogs o
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New Technologies Give Government Ample Means to Track Suspects, Study Finds http://nyti.ms/1KkfoRZ
Fears that encrypted communication will prevent agencies from tracking terrorists are overstated, according to a study that included current and former intelligence officials.
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Hayward, CA
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Binghamton, NY
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Software Engineer
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    Software Engineer, 2006 - present
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The oil change itself seemed okay, but it seemed understaffed (two people), and they were fairly unhelpful. Nobody talked to the customers when they arrived. Waited a long time to pay after the oil change was done, while they both worked on another car. The maintenance light wasn't reset so I went back, and after waiting for a while I ended up looking up in the manual how to reset it myself.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
We eat here often. The garlic noodles are very tasty.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
They moved to Mountain View at 2500 El Camino Real, on the corner opposite Whole Foods and Target. Other than that, smooth transaction; they took a carload of old electronics and didn't seem too picky.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
4 reviews
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Smooth transaction; rented a cargo van Saturday afternoon, returned that night (after hours). Actual cost: $30 + $42 mileage + $35 fuel + $7 taxes = $114 for 53 miles.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago