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Brian Sayatovic
Works at A Legal Services Software Company
Attended University of Cincinnati
Lives in Ohio
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Brian Sayatovic

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The Third Party Doctrine Strikes Again

It's clear that the problem is with the third party doctrine. It basically states that the moment you share information with someone beyond yourself, you can no longer count on it being secret. While it's true you no longer have a guarantee of that information remaining a shared secret (see: trust), that shouldn't mean that anyone else should be able to have that information as well, especially when not warranted.

I think we need a legislative fix, perhaps a constitutional one, codifying that one's effects also includes shared information, and therefore would not be searchable not seizure without warrant. 
 
The reversal comes as a blow to privacy advocates seeking more protections for mobile devices.
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Brian Sayatovic

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Exception Coding

We've recently introduced the concept of exception coding in one of our large applications.  The goal is to better categories the types of exceptions so we can empirically identify and quantify problems.

When an exception occurs, our application logs (eventually making its way to our +Splunk server).  The exception has three key pieces of information:

1. The type of exception (e.g. NullReferenceException, ArgumentException, SystemException)
2. The stack trace of the exception
3. The exception's message

The majority of exceptions we encounter are programming mistakes that affect any user who steps on the faulty code.  However, because each user is different and the data they're working with is different, the log output differs.  But for a given code problem, it differs only in the third piece of information: the exception's message.  Therefore the other two pieces of information do not vary for a particular code problem: the exception type and stack trace.

So our Exception Coding computes a hash of the exception type and stack trace and produces a simple hexadecimal code (e.g. "C76F97E1").  These codes don't need to be memorizable, but they are recognizable.  And they're distinct enough visually to be easily zeroed in on in a big log message, and they're unique enough for simple string-based content searching.

Our exception codes are simple:
1. We use xxHash because it's fast, low collisions, and is available in a wide number of languages we might use throughout the enterprise
2. We exclude filename and line numbers which aren't always available (trading accuracy for consistency)
3. We reference them across the enterprise: customer support, Splunk, issue tracking, user's unhandled exception dialog, etc.

We've only had them in production a short while, but already it's helping to highlight which problems are the most frequent.  And when a problem is reported by a user, since the dialog includes any Exception Code, support personnel are able to quickly recognize known problems without contacting the next tier of support.
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A new movie, Maggie, in the works, starting Arnold!... and NOT as an action hero. It looks quite good.

Maggie Official Trailer #1 (2015) - Arnold Schwarzenegger, Abigail Bresl...: https://youtu.be/AQ5Vz8qE8R8
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Brian Sayatovic

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Leveraging the weather.

#spring

+Shawn Sayatovic​
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I'd like to clarify my earlier stance.  Some people may be projecting their own fears or concerns about drugs onto me and are entirely missing my point.

My biggest problem with the proposals from both Responsible Ohio and Responsible Ohioans for Cannabis is that they are proposed as amendments to the Ohio Constitution.

I believe a state Constitution should be basic and fundamental in describing how a state governs.  Broad, timeless statements and rules.  Specifics about how the state governs are handled by the legislature.  I feel that both proposed amendments are way too specific to amend our Constitution.  One is bad enough, and the other is even worse.

This reasoning is not a white-washed cover story for me secretly wanting to be a pothead.  I deeply, sincerely believe this is not what a Constitutional amendment is for.  This is the same reason I voted against Ohio's gambling amendment a few years ago, even though I do not have a problem with responsible gambling.  It is why I will vote against both of these proposed amendments.

My fear is that, like the gambling amendment before it, too many pro-marijuana or anti-criminalization advocates will vote for these amendments not because they believe the amendments amend the definition of Ohio, but because it furthers their cause or their personal desires.  We'll be left with yet another specific, nuanced and difficult to alter amendment scarring our Constitution.  The U.S. Constitution has it's scar from prohibition; so too shall Ohio's.

So I am speaking out to share my opinion -- my belief -- that even if you are for legalization, you should vote against these proposals.
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Brian Sayatovic

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Which +Microsoft Developer platform should I bet on this time? #Silverlight
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Brian Sayatovic

Silverlight  - 
 
Did everyone enjoy Google #Chrome v42 being released yesterday, disabling the NPAPI that the #Silverlight  plugin works through?
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José Morango's profile photoBrian Sayatovic's profile photo
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I get that the Netscape Plug-in API is old and crusty. It was used in Chrome and is still used in Firefox (and maybe Opera?) But Silverlight always ran as an ActiveX control in Internet Explorer. I bet if Microsoft hadn't end-of-life'ed Silverlight, we would've seen Microsoft build Silverlight as a Chrome Extension. 
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I just played chicken with a duck. A Mallard duck. I'm glad it finally flew off because I didn't know what my next move was going to be.

#spring 
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We heavily leverage #Splunk  with out new Exception Codes, so I thought I'd share here, as well.
 
Exception Coding

We've recently introduced the concept of exception coding in one of our large applications.  The goal is to better categories the types of exceptions so we can empirically identify and quantify problems.

When an exception occurs, our application logs (eventually making its way to our +Splunk server).  The exception has three key pieces of information:

1. The type of exception (e.g. NullReferenceException, ArgumentException, SystemException)
2. The stack trace of the exception
3. The exception's message

The majority of exceptions we encounter are programming mistakes that affect any user who steps on the faulty code.  However, because each user is different and the data they're working with is different, the log output differs.  But for a given code problem, it differs only in the third piece of information: the exception's message.  Therefore the other two pieces of information do not vary for a particular code problem: the exception type and stack trace.

So our Exception Coding computes a hash of the exception type and stack trace and produces a simple hexadecimal code (e.g. "C76F97E1").  These codes don't need to be memorizable, but they are recognizable.  And they're distinct enough visually to be easily zeroed in on in a big log message, and they're unique enough for simple string-based content searching.

Our exception codes are simple:
1. We use xxHash because it's fast, low collisions, and is available in a wide number of languages we might use throughout the enterprise
2. We exclude filename and line numbers which aren't always available (trading accuracy for consistency)
3. We reference them across the enterprise: customer support, Splunk, issue tracking, user's unhandled exception dialog, etc.

We've only had them in production a short while, but already it's helping to highlight which problems are the most frequent.  And when a problem is reported by a user, since the dialog includes any Exception Code, support personnel are able to quickly recognize known problems without contacting the next tier of support.
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Karsten Thygesen's profile photoBrian Sayatovic's profile photo
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I started looking into getting the hashes computed in Splunk itself, but at the moment, our application logging code is including them so Splunk can just extract them.
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Brian Sayatovic

HTC One M8  - 
 
It seems my +T-Mobile +HTC One M8 couldn't pick up the Band 12 (1900MHz) LTE tower that my wife's +Samsung USA  Galaxy S5 was picking up.
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Joe Bo's profile photoLawrence Greb's profile photoBrian Sayatovic's profile photo
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Here's the raw text I shared on reddit ( comment: http://www.reddit.com/r/htcone/comments/300bs7/same_location_tmobile_htc_one_m8_no_signal_samsung_galaxy_s5_4g_lte/cpoy5dc )

This is closer to what I was trying to understand.

According to iFixIt's Step #9, the M8 has a "Qualcomm WTR1625L RF transceiver and WTR1625 (modem?)". And in Step #15, "a Qualcomm QFE1550 dynamic antenna matching tuner*".

According to this document, the WTR1625(L) modem itself supports Bands 12 (700MHz) and Band 2 (1900MHz), among all of the others (though LTE bands have more specific frequency ranges, overlaps, etc.)

According to Qualcomm, the QFE15xx's antenna tuner operates over 700-2700MHz. Again, I'm sure it could be more complicated than just saying its supported range covers the band in question.

So perhaps the hardware could in fact support it, but: * The assembled device isn't FCC approved for it (and FCC approval ain't cheap and takes time) * It's supportable but just not (yet) enabled in any radios ROMs.
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In his circles
117 people
Have him in circles
274 people
Andrew Marshall's profile photo
Michel Houle's profile photo
nicole benitez deiaz's profile photo
FreshThit Thanyapakluepong's profile photo
Sergey Izmailov's profile photo
Ramesh Kamath's profile photo
Gavin Hoffman's profile photo
Bernhardt Joseph's profile photo
Ken Laube's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Enterprise Architect
Skills
Enterprise and application architect, .NET, Java, ...
Employment
  • A Legal Services Software Company
    Sr. Software Architect, 2009 - present
  • The Midland Company
    Sr. Application Designer, 2003 - 2009
  • Synchrony Communications
    Application Programmer, 2001 - 2003
  • Quicksand Development, LLC
    Application Programmer, 1999 - 2001
  • netcaddy.com
    Sr. Application Programmer, 1995 - 1999
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Currently
Ohio
Previously
North Carolina - Florida - Ohio
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Master Cloudweaver
Introduction

Master Cloudweaver

I'm a #DotNet programmer (formerly a #Java programmer) architecting and building enterprise applications (i.e. cloudweaving).  I'm an #Android fan.  I'm a husband.  I'm a father.  I'm a geek.  I'm survivor of Fairfield High School ('94) and University of Cincinnati ('99).  I know that I don't know everything but probably know more than I think I know while also thinking I know more than I actually do.

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I almost deserve the respect I get.
Education
  • University of Cincinnati
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