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Brian Flanagan
9,404 followers -
Rhymes with shenanigan.
Rhymes with shenanigan.

9,404 followers
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I recently received an email from what sounded like a very bright young person, talking about machine consciousness, qualia, and "essentia."

Then that email rather mysteriously disappeared.

So this is a 'message in a bottle,' whereby I hope to reach that individual and ask that they try again.
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Yesterday I posted some laudatory comments on a book review by Christof Koch in this community.

I also provided a great deal of background on the foundational issues he raised.

Those comments have since disappeared, without a word of explanation from G+.

Therefore I will no longer be posting in this forum.

Yesterday I posted some laudatory comments on a book review by Christof Koch in the "STEM on Google+" community.

I also provided a great deal of background on the foundational issues he raised.

Those comments have since disappeared, without a word of explanation from G+.

Therefore I will no longer be posting in that forum.

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Earlier this year, researchers working on the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) made the first ever detection of gravitational waves. The waves are believed to have been created by the merger of two binary black holes, in an event dubbed GW150914. Now, however, new theoretical work done by an international team of researchers suggests that other hypothetical exotic stellar objects – such as wormholes or "gravastars" – could produce a very similar gravitational-wave signal. While it is theoretically possible to differentiate between the different sources, it is impossible to tell whether GW150914 had a more exotic origin than merging black holes because the signal was not strong enough to be resolved.

The researchers point out that, in the future, the detection of stronger gravitational-wave signals could reveal more information about their sources – especially once the sensitivity of aLIGO is increased to its ultimate design level. In addition, future space-based detectors, such as the European Space Agency's Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), could reveal tiny discrepancies between detected and predicted signals, if they exist.

About the author:

Tushna Commissariat is a reporter for physicsworld.com

http://bit.ly/1T2j0sV

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Here's a very nice review from Christof Koch of Soul Machine, by George Makari.

http://bit.ly/1ZhAX8t
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Koch is one of the leading figures in contemporary neuroscience and is always wonderfully clear about his worldview. His piece in SciAm touches on the foundations of science, including several important background assumptions which continue to guide all scientific thinking today — and which are, I would argue, thoroughly mistaken.
_____________

Soul Machine

http://amzn.to/1ZhQIw6

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IBM scientists have built a quantum processor that users can access through a first-of-a-kind quantum computing platform delivered via the IBM Cloud onto any desktop or mobile device. IBM believes quantum computing is the future of computing and has the potential to solve certain problems that are impossible to solve on today’s supercomputers.

The cloud-enabled quantum computing platform, called IBM Quantum Experience, will allow users to run algorithms and experiments on IBM’s quantum processor, work with the individual quantum bits (qubits), and explore tutorials and simulations around what might be possible with quantum computing.

The quantum processor is composed of five superconducting qubits and is housed at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York. The five-qubit processor represents the latest advancement in IBM’s quantum architecture that can scale to larger quantum systems. It is the leading approach towards building a universal quantum computer.

http://ibm.co/1QSlvtb

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IBM scientists have built a quantum processor that users can access through a first-of-a-kind quantum computing platform delivered via the IBM Cloud onto any desktop or mobile device. IBM believes quantum computing is the future of computing and has the potential to solve certain problems that are impossible to solve on today’s supercomputers.

The cloud-enabled quantum computing platform, called IBM Quantum Experience, will allow users to run algorithms and experiments on IBM’s quantum processor, work with the individual quantum bits (qubits), and explore tutorials and simulations around what might be possible with quantum computing.

The quantum processor is composed of five superconducting qubits and is housed at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York. The five-qubit processor represents the latest advancement in IBM’s quantum architecture that can scale to larger quantum systems. It is the leading approach towards building a universal quantum computer.

http://ibm.co/1QSlvtb

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Quantum steering describes the ability of one party (Alice) to “steer” the states of a remote party (Bob) by performing measurements on her half of an entangled set of particles. According to theory, steering can be directional: there are situations in which Alice can steer Bob but not vice versa. Previous experiments hinted at the possibility of this one-way steering, but only worked for a restricted class of optical quantum measurements. The teams led by Chuan-Feng Li at the University of Science and Technology of China and Geoff Pryde at Griffith University, Australia, have now demonstrated one-way steering for general types of quantum measurements.

http://bit.ly/1Vynnzb

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Quantum steering describes the ability of one party (Alice) to “steer” the states of a remote party (Bob) by performing measurements on her half of an entangled set of particles. According to theory, steering can be directional: there are situations in which Alice can steer Bob but not vice versa. Previous experiments hinted at the possibility of this one-way steering, but only worked for a restricted class of optical quantum measurements. The teams led by Chuan-Feng Li at the University of Science and Technology of China and Geoff Pryde at Griffith University, Australia, have now demonstrated one-way steering for general types of quantum measurements.

http://bit.ly/1Vynnzb

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I heartily recommend Michael Atiyah's works on math and physics -- realms where he's a household name owing to his many important contributions.

Moreover, he writes with a clarity and precision that's all too rare. Why mention this item? As he explains:

"Well-written papers become 'classics' and are widely read by future mathematicians. Badly written papers are ignored or, if they are sufficiently important, they get rewritten by others."

You can find a bit of biographical material here, as well as a list of references: 

http://bit.ly/RUeIAM
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 Advice to a Young Mathematician

~Sir Michael Atiyah

We are all taught that “proof” is the central feature of mathematics, and Euclidean geometry with its careful array of axioms and propositions has provided the essential framework for modern thought since the Renaissance. Mathematicians pride themselves on absolute certainty, in comparison with the tentative steps of natural scientists, let alone the woolly thinking of other areas.

It is true that, since Gödel, absolute certainty has been undermined, and the more mundane assault of computer proofs of interminable length has induced some humility. Despite all this, proof retains its cardinal role in mathematics, and a serious gap in your argument will lead to your paper being rejected. 

However, it is a mistake to identify research in mathematics with the process of producing proofs. In fact, one could say that all the really creative aspects of mathematical research precede the proof stage. To take the metaphor of the “stage” further, you have to start with the idea, develop the plot, write the dialogue, and provide the theatrical instructions. The actual production can be viewed as the “proof”: the implementation of an idea. 

In mathematics, ideas and concepts come first, then come questions and problems. At this stage the search for solutions begins, one looks for a method or strategy. Once you have convinced yourself that the problem has been well-posed, and that you have the right tools for the job, you then begin to think hard about the technicalities of the proof.

http://bit.ly/1WPsH0J
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